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I'm building a questionnaire. The questionnaire have multiple sections, each section has multiple questions, and each question can have one to many answers. Each question can be a different type (radio buttons, checkbox, text...).

I put my tables in the model and loop through the sections table to display sections, loop through questions to display questions, loop through answerOptions to populate answers:

     <fieldset>
        <legend>Fields</legend>
        <%foreach (var s in Model.Sections)
          { %>
          <h3><%=s.SCTN_TXT %></h3>
          <% var QuestsInSect = Model.GetQuestionsBySectionID(s.SCTN_ID);%>
          <%foreach (var q in QuestsInSect){%>
            <h4><%=q.QSTN_TXT %><%=q.QSTN_ID.ToString() %></h4>
            <% var answers = Model.GetAnswerOptionByQuestionID(q.QSTN_ID); %>
             <%if (q.QSTN_TYP_ID>= 3)
              {%>

                <%:Html.TextBox(q.QSTN_ID.ToString())%>

            <%}
            else if (q.QSTN_TYP_ID == 1)
              { %>
                <%var answerOptions = Model.GetDropDownListAnswerOptionByQuestionID(q.QSTN_ID);%>

                <%:Html.DropDownList(q.QSTN_ID.ToString(), answerOptions)%>
              <%}
              else
              { %>
                  <% foreach (var ao in answers)
                     { %>
                        <br />
                        <%:Html.CheckBox(q.QSTN_ID.ToString())%>
                        <%=ao.ANS_VAL%>

        <%        }     
              }
            }
          } %>
        <p>
            <input type="submit" value="Create" />
        </p>
    </fieldset>

In my controller I loop through collection.Allkeys to figure out the answer for each question:

        [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Create(FormCollection collection)
    {
        try
        {
            // TODO: Add insert logic here
            List<ASSMNT_RESP> arList = new List<ASSMNT_RESP>();


            foreach (string key in collection.AllKeys)
            {
                QSTN q = _model.GetQuestionByQuestionID(int.Parse(key));
                IEnumerable<ANS_OPTN> aos = _model.GetAnswerOptionByQuestionID(int.Parse(key));
                ASSMNT_RESP ar = new ASSMNT_RESP();
                ar.QSTN_ID = int.Parse(key);
                ar.ASSMNT_ID = 1;

                if (q.QSTN_TYP_ID == 1)//dropdown
                {
                    //do something
                }
                else if (q.QSTN_TYP_ID == 2)//checkboxlist
                {
                    //do something

                }
                else
                {
                    //do something    
                }



                //_model.AddAssessmentResponse(ar);
                System.Diagnostics.Trace.WriteLine(key + "---"+ collection[key]);

            }
            //_model.Save();
            return RedirectToAction("Index");
        }
        catch
        {
            return View();
        }
    }

It works, but I just don't think it's a very good design. It seems like I have too much logic in the view. I would like to move the logic in the view and controller to the model. Can you recommend an easier/cleaner way to do this?

Thanks.

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You might consider asking this on CodeReview instead - codereview.stackexchange.com - Described as "...a question and answer site for sharing code from projects you are working on for peer review." –  Snixtor May 7 '13 at 21:18
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2 Answers

I'm not an expert on MVC, but I think you'd get a lot of benefit out of using a strongly-typed view based on a custom model class that you build. The properties exposed by such a model can be nested (i.e., the top-level model can consist of properties each of which are also custom classes). Conceptually, something like:

public class MyTopLevelModel
{
   public MySubModel1 SubModel1 { get; set; }
   public MySubModel2 SubModel2 { get; set; }
}

public class MySubModel1
{
   public string AProperty { get; set; }
   public int AnotherProperty { get; set; }
}

You can include collections in the class definitions, too. And then you can decorate the individual properties with with attributes specifying whether a particular property is required, a range of permissible values, etc.

It's a big subject, though, and this only scratches the surface. FWIW, I've gotten a LOT out of Steven Sanderson's Pro ASP.NET MVC2 Framework book.

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Mark, thanks for replying. I actually use strongly-typed view. Sections is a property. I put questions and answer options in properties also, but I figured out it's easier to call a function to return questions in a section. –  MsBugKiller Mar 28 '11 at 2:45
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Make your viewmodel more explicit.

public class ViewModel 
{
    public IList<SectionViewModel> Sections {get;set;}
}

public class SectionViewModel 
{
    public IList<QuestionViewModel> Questions {get;set;}
}

public class QuestionViewModel 
{
    public IList<AnswerViewModel> Answers {get;set;}
}

In your view you can then do something like this (I'm using razor):

@foreach(var section in Model.Sections)
{
   <h3>@section.Name</h3> 

   foreach(var question in section.Questions)
   {
      <h4>@question.Name</h4>

      foreach(var question in section.Questions)
      {
         @Html.EditorFor(x=> question.Answers)
      }  
   }
}

Then create an EditorTemplate for your AnswerViewModel.

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