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myCol
------
 true
 true
 true
 false
 false
 null

In the above table, if I do :

select count(*), count(myCol);

I get 6, 5

I get 5 as it doesn't count the null entry.

How do I also count the number of true values (3 in the example)?

(This is a simplification and I'm actually using a much more complicated expression within the count function)

Edit summary: I also want to include a plain count(*) in the query, so can't use a where clause

share|improve this question
    
Does 't' stand for True anf 'f' for False? Or are you looking for something like SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT myCol). – Shamit Verma Mar 22 '11 at 19:16
    
take a look at my second example, you can throw a WHERE myCol = true in there if you want and if you remove the first *, it'll just return the number. – vol7ron Mar 22 '11 at 19:41
    
@Shamit yes t stands for true, and f stands for false, I've updated the question – EoghanM Mar 22 '11 at 20:23
    
You might as well not simplify your question/query... your requirements restrict the better performance possibilities and people are responding with inefficient answers, which are getting bumped up for no good reason. – vol7ron Mar 23 '11 at 0:18
1  
@vol7ron in my defense there has to be some simplification in order to ask a comprehensible question, but yes, I oversimplified when I originally posted. – EoghanM Mar 24 '11 at 17:26
up vote 40 down vote accepted
SELECT COALESCE(sum(CASE WHEN myCol THEN 1 ELSE 0 END),0) FROM <table name>

or, as you found out for yourself:

SELECT count(CASE WHEN myCol THEN 1 ELSE null END) FROM <table name>
share|improve this answer
    
This is a good hack and gets the right answer from me. I'll accept it unless someone comes up with a shorter solution? – EoghanM Mar 22 '11 at 20:24
1  
also, any reason why you did sum(.. THEN 1 ELSE 0) instead of count(.. THEN true else null) ? – EoghanM Mar 22 '11 at 20:32
2  
No... it is just that I wasn't sure which values would count() count... and I knew that sum did the trick. But beware: On second thought I believe that sum() over only null values will return null, so it should be COALESCE(sum(...),0) for you, or, in other words, count() is better, – Daniel Mar 22 '11 at 21:38
    
Thankyou! Never thought my query would work in a million years! – user1158559 Dec 4 '12 at 18:15
    
@EoghanM, see shorter answer involving cast. – Dwayne Towell Jan 3 '14 at 18:10

probably, the best approach is to use nullif function.

in general

select
    count(nullif(myCol = false, true)),  -- count true values
    count(nullif(myCol = true, true)),   -- count false values
    count(myCol);

or in short

select
    count(nullif(myCol, true)),  -- count false values
    count(nullif(myCol, false)), -- count true values
    count(myCol);

http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.0/static/functions-conditional.html

share|improve this answer
2  
Your "in general" looks wrong: AFAICS, nullif([boolean expression], true) will return false if [boolean expression] is false, and null if it is true, so you will be counting the false values. I think you want nullif([boolean expression], false). – rjmunro Jul 22 '15 at 11:21
    
yep, the "general" case should be the other way around. fixed. thanks. – wrobell Jul 24 '15 at 14:41
    
Yuk. That fix is really confusing. AFAICS, it will now count true or null values. I think that rephrasing it so that you always have nullif([boolean expression], false) makes it much easier to read. You can then vary the boolean expression part to be whatever you like, in this case myCol = true to count true values, or myCol = false to count false values, or name='john' to count people called john etc. – rjmunro Jul 24 '15 at 15:09

Cast the Boolean to an integer and sum.

SELECT count(*),sum(myCol::int);

You get 6,3.

share|improve this answer
select f1,
       CASE WHEN f1 = 't' THEN COUNT(*) 
            WHEN f1 = 'f' THEN COUNT(*) 
            END AS counts,
       (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM mytable) AS total_counts
from mytable
group by f1

Or Maybe this

SELECT SUM(CASE WHEN f1 = 't' THEN 1 END) AS t,
       SUM(CASE WHEN f1 = 'f' THEN 1 END) AS f,
       SUM(CASE WHEN f1 NOT IN ('t','f') OR f1 IS NULL THEN 1 END) AS others,
       SUM(CASE WHEN f1 IS NOT NULL OR f1 IS NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS total_count
FROM mytable;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 If myCol expression is a boolean, you can replace the check with where (myCol) – ypercubeᵀᴹ Mar 22 '11 at 19:14
    
sorry I oversimplified my example: I can't use a where clause as I also want to return a total count representing the total number of rows, as well as a count of the true values. – EoghanM Mar 22 '11 at 20:20

In MySQL, you can do this as well:

SELECT count(*) AS total
     , sum(myCol) AS countTrue --yes, you can add TRUEs as TRUE=1 and FALSE=0 !!
FROM yourTable
;

I think that in Postgres, this works:

SELECT count(*) AS total
     , sum(myCol::int) AS countTrue --convert Boolean to Integer
FROM yourTable
;

or better (to avoid :: and use standard SQL syntax):

SELECT count(*) AS total
     , sum(CAST(myCol AS int)) AS countTrue --convert Boolean to Integer
FROM yourTable
;
share|improve this answer

The shortest and laziest (without casting) solution would be to use the formula:

SELECT COUNT(myCol OR NULL) FROM myTable;

Try it yourself:

SELECT COUNT(x < 7 OR NULL)
   FROM GENERATE_SERIES(0,10) t(x);

gives the same result than

SELECT SUM(CASE WHEN x < 7 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)
   FROM GENERATE_SERIES(0,10) t(x);
share|improve this answer
    
This is definitely a nicer solution than mine :) – Daniel Nov 30 '15 at 23:21
SELECT count(*)         -- or count(myCol)
FROM   <table name>     -- replace <table name> with your table
WHERE  myCol = true;

Here's a way with Windowing Function:

SELECT DISTINCT *, count(*) over(partition by myCol)
FROM   <table name>;

-- Outputs:
-- --------------
-- myCol | count
-- ------+-------
--  f    |  2
--  t    |  3
--       |  1
share|improve this answer
    
sorry I can't return multiple rows for the more complicated example I'm applying this solution to. – EoghanM Mar 22 '11 at 20:33
    
Yes, but you can restrict it further by just adding WHERE myCol = true. I provided the second example not because it's any faster, but more as an educational piece to Postgres's windowing functions, which many users aren't comfortable with, or don't know about. – vol7ron Mar 23 '11 at 0:00

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