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I'm testing a class that is part of a hierarchy. I've been setting up my test classes with the object under test, and a PrivateObject to allow access to that object. I'm getting exceptions when I attempt to access private members of the parent class.

The only workaround I've found so far is to pass a PrivateType specifying the base class to the PrivateObject constructor, but then it doesn't work on private members of the subclass.

Is there some way I can do this, perhaps by using the binding flags parameter on the Get* methods of Private object?

I did try using the automatically-generated Accessor classes (right-click in the main class, Create Private Accessor). However, that's worse: It shows a property I can read, but it throws the same exception as PrivateObject does, and there's no other options I can use (binding flags or whatnot) to fix the exception.

Here's my sample test code. I'd like there to be some way to construct and use the PrivateObject to retrieve both fields.

public class BaseClass
{
    private int one = 1;
}

public class SubClass : BaseClass
{
    private int two = 2;
}

[TestClass]
public class UnitTest1
{
    BindingFlags flags = BindingFlags.FlattenHierarchy | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance;

    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethod1()
    {
        SubClass test = new SubClass();
        PrivateObject priv = new PrivateObject(test);

        Assert.AreNotEqual<int>(0, (int)priv.GetFieldOrProperty("one", flags)); // System.MissingMethodException: Method 'PrivateObjectTester.SubClass.one' not found.
        Assert.AreNotEqual<int>(0, (int)priv.GetFieldOrProperty("two", flags));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethod2()
    {
        SubClass test = new SubClass();
        PrivateObject priv = new PrivateObject(test, new PrivateType(typeof(BaseClass)));

        Assert.AreNotEqual<int>(0, (int)priv.GetFieldOrProperty("one", flags));
        Assert.AreNotEqual<int>(0, (int)priv.GetFieldOrProperty("two", flags)); // System.MissingMethodException: Method 'PrivateObjectTester.BaseClass.two' not found.
    }
}
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1  
Just as a side note, you can access the protected members using PrivateObject –  André Pena Sep 4 '12 at 19:07

5 Answers 5

I didn't find the answer, so this is what I ended up doing. I created PrivateObjects for each level of the class's hierarchy, and I just need to be careful when writing test cases that I use the proper one.

public class BaseClass
{
    private int one = 1;
}

public class SubClass : BaseClass
{
    private int two = 2;
}

[TestClass]
public class UnitTest1
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethod()
    {
        SubClass test = new SubClass();
        PrivateObject privSub = new PrivateObject(test, new PrivateType(typeof(SubClass)));
        PrivateObject privBase = new PrivateObject(test, new PrivateType(typeof(BaseClass)));

        Assert.AreNotEqual<int>(0, (int)privBase.GetFieldOrProperty("one"));
        Assert.AreNotEqual<int>(0, (int)privSub.GetFieldOrProperty("two"));
    }
}
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This likely isn't the answer you want...but you shouldn't be testing both classes in one method in the first place. You should only ever be testing one class at a time. If you feel the need to do this, then I'd guess that your code needs refactoring. But as I don't know your real-life code problem, I can't say for sure

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1  
I'm not really testing two classes, I'm testing a class, along with its base class. In my case, I'm testing some cleanup behavior: When the object cleans itself up, I'm checking that all of the cleanup tasks have happened properly, and some of those are in the base, and some in the subclass. You are correct, ideally, I should be testing base class cleanup by itself, but part of this test is testing abnormal cleanup that only can happen with this particular subclass. –  David Yaw Apr 15 '11 at 18:36

PrivateObject is a bit on the "dumb" side when it comes to handling inheritance. Unfortunately, its methods are not virtual, so there's no easy way to change this behaviour. You essentially have two options: either live with the limitations or create your own private accessor helper that can handle inherited members transparently.

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// create an instance of class SearchPlanogramsBuilder:
SearchPlanogramsBuilder searchPlanogramBuilder = new SearchPlanogramsBuilder(); 

// executing the method BuildSearchParameters(return type is void) with input searchPlanoGramsFilters:
searchPlanogramBuilder.BuildSearchParameters(searchPlanoGramsFilters);

// create privateobject and pass instance created for the class:
PrivateObject helperobject1 = new PrivateObject(searchPlanogramBuilder);

// type cast exactly as parameter(which is private variable) in the method:
Collection<string> parameter = (Collection<string>)helperobject1.GetFieldOrProperty("parameters");
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As André Pena wrote. Why would you like to test private members of the Baseclass through the Subclass. You wouldn't have access to these members in normal code of your Subclass either. You have to make the Properties members protected to have access to them from the Subclass.

Then you can also test these Members with the PrivateObject.

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