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I'm using jQuery 1.5.1 This is my code:

$('.cellcontent').animate({
   left: '-=190'}, {
   easing: alert('start ani'),
   duration: 5000,
   complete: alert('end ani')});

I get both alerts before the animation starts!? I want the complete function to start after the animation has ended. Any thoughts?

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api.jquery.com/animate –  Rocket Hazmat Mar 22 '11 at 20:18
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4 Answers

You need to pass a function to call. Instead you are calling the function.

complete:  function() { alert('end ani'); } 
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I see two things wrong with this.

One, easing should be:

A string indicating which easing function to use for the transition

And complete should be a function.

http://api.jquery.com/animate

alert('start ani');
$('.cellcontent').animate({
     left: '-=190'
   },
   {
     easing: 'swing',
     duration: 5000,
     complete: function(){
        alert('end ani');
    }
});
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You need to pass a function to complete.

Try this:

$('.cellcontent').animate({
    left: '-=190'}, {
    easing: alert('start ani'),
    duration: 5000,
    complete: function() { alert('end ani') }
});

Since complete expects a function, it executes the code you pass to it to get a function object that it can call back to when finished.

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easing is still wrong. –  Rocket Hazmat Mar 22 '11 at 20:26
    
Yes it is, but from the question the OP wanted to know when the animation started, and this will show that. –  Alan Geleynse Mar 22 '11 at 21:35
    
It will work, but it's still wrong. alert() returns undefined which is passed to easing, that's why it works. If you want to know when it started, just put the alert before the .animate() call. –  Rocket Hazmat Mar 23 '11 at 1:39
1  
True, it is wrong, I was just trying to answer the direct question and left that part alone. Other people have given better answers that address both. –  Alan Geleynse Mar 23 '11 at 2:05
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declare them in a function first, otherwise the method is called instantly:

var onComplete = function () {
    alert('end ani');
};

then call them without the ()

$('.cellcontent').animate({
    left: '-=190'}, {
    easing:  'slow', 
    duration: 5000,
    complete: onComplete //<-- function is passed as a variable, not called directly
 });

or wrap them directly into a function (less readable and slower when calling this a lot):

$('.cellcontent').animate({
  left: '-=190'}, {
  easing:  'slow',
  duration: 5000,
  complete:  function () {
        alert('end ani');
  }
}); 
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easing is still wrong. This code does not work. –  Rocket Hazmat Mar 22 '11 at 20:27
    
easing is normally a string, in this case I have no Idea what the OP's intentions are or how he gets to this code. –  Caspar Kleijne Mar 22 '11 at 20:29
    
Now i get an error: d.easing[j || k] is not a function ?? –  Overbeeke Mar 22 '11 at 20:30
    
@Caspar: easing is always a string. I'm assuming the OP wants a function to be called before the animation (hence 'start ani'). –  Rocket Hazmat Mar 22 '11 at 20:31
1  
Thanks for all the answers. I misunderstood easing. I understand it defines the acceleration of the animation. The default is 'swing' (parabolic) and the other option is 'lineair'. –  Overbeeke Mar 22 '11 at 20:48
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