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My inputs are: an array of object names and objects. I want to loop through the array for object name and then output something from corresponding object. My code is as follows:

    options=["bold","italic"] ;

    var bold ={
            action: function(){
                alert("<strong>just bold</strong>");
            },
            b_p: "-40px bold"
     };

    var italic ={
            action: function(){
                alert("<em>an italic</em>");
            },
            b_p: "-20px italic"
     };

     for(i=0;i<options.length;++i)
     {
         document.write(options[i].b_p);
     }

My desired output: "-40px bold -20px italic" but I get an error saying: "undefined undefined".

Please help me to find out my mistake/ignorance here.

Thanks.

/******/ Update: the problem is solved below :-) Thanks communtiy

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Write out the steps your code is going through on paper and you'll find the problem. –  aehiilrs Mar 22 '11 at 20:30
    
well, options is just an array of strings, and a string does not have a "b_p" property. Or I'm misunderstanding something in your exemple. –  Johnny5 Mar 22 '11 at 20:32
    
@john yah! you got it right. I just guessed this solution from php, wasn't sure about that. –  zzz_corp Mar 22 '11 at 20:42
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Instead of passing the names, pass an object array:

var bold = {
            action: function(){
                alert("<strong>just bold</strong>");
            },
            b_p: "-40px bold"
};

var italic = {
            action: function(){
                alert("<em>an italic</em>");
            },
            b_p: "-20px italic"
};

var options = [ bold, italic ]; // symbols, not strings

for(var i=0;i<options.length;++i)
{
         document.write(options[i].b_p);
}

Nothing else would really need to change.

share|improve this answer
    
Needs to come after the variables are defined. –  tvanfosson Mar 22 '11 at 20:31
    
tried this and got an error: options[i] is undefined :-( –  zzz_corp Mar 22 '11 at 20:32
    
Actually options would need to be declared after bold and italic in this case –  Corey Sunwold Mar 22 '11 at 20:32
    
Hey "tvanfossen" :-D your suggestion made it correct.......so basically when options=[bold,italic] line is executed both bold and italic are considered as null since no such variable is declared before that. –  zzz_corp Mar 22 '11 at 20:34
    
@zzz - if you want me to see a comment, you need to prefix my name with the @ symbol as I've done with yours. Only the first three characters are needed. FWIW, no 'e' in my name. –  tvanfosson Mar 22 '11 at 20:36
show 4 more comments

A few problems here:

options=["bold","italic"] ; should be options=[bold,italic];

and should be after the declaration of the bold and italic vars

Also, for(i=0;i<options.length;++i) should be for(i=0;i<options.length;i++) (note the post-increment instead of a pre-increment)

So to sum it up:

var bold ={
        action: function(){
            alert("<strong>just bold</strong>");
        },
        b_p: "-40px bold"
 };

var italic ={
        action: function(){
            alert("<em>an italic</em>");
        },
        b_p: "-20px italic"
 };

 var options=[bold,italic];

 for(i=0;i<options.length;i++)
 {
     document.write(options[i].b_p);
 }
share|improve this answer
    
@Damp hey, you summed up nice :-) please tell me why you preferred post-increment more? any special reason? In this case, both are identical, isn't it? –  zzz_corp Mar 22 '11 at 20:44
    
@zzz_corp Actually you're right, It doesn't matter that much... I'm just used to seeing it that way –  Damp Mar 22 '11 at 20:48
    
@zzz - either are acceptable. Pre-increment is marginally more efficient (if the implementation is stupid) since it won't need to keep the original value around. In pratice this idiom is probably handled the same way for both. Search for just about any question on the issue of pre-/post-increment on SO for more info. –  tvanfosson Mar 22 '11 at 20:48
1  
@zzz - it really should declare i as local to the scope, though, using var. for (var i=0; i<options.length;++i) { } –  tvanfosson Mar 22 '11 at 20:52
    
@tva As "i" is considered loop index throughout of my code so i just skipped this variable scope. –  zzz_corp Mar 22 '11 at 20:57
show 1 more comment

Here is a much more cleaner approach:

var options = {
    "bold": {
        "action": "<strong>just bold</strong>",
        "b_p": "-40px bold"
    },

    "italic": {
        "action": "<em>an italic</em>",
        "b_p": "-20px italic"
    }
};

for (var i in options) {
    document.write(options[i]["b_p"] + "<br />")
}

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/sea2d/

If you wanted to alert your action, you could just use:

alert(options["bold"]["action"]);
share|improve this answer
    
yeh, this is a nice approach but my requirement is to use both array and object concepts. –  zzz_corp Mar 22 '11 at 20:48
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