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team = ['sean', 'david', 'JK', 'KB', 'nina']

for i in team:
   print(i), print(len(i))

Above shows following result:

sean
4
david
5
JK
2
KB
2
nina
4

but my instruction book shows this:

sean 4
david 5
JK 2
KB 2
nina 4

how do I get "xxx, y" format? What am I doing wrong?

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Why does the formatting of OP's code keep changing? If OP wants the print and the for on the same line, why should we object? –  David Heffernan Mar 22 '11 at 21:39

6 Answers 6

Try

for i in team:
    print(i, len(i))
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You want:

team = ['sean', 'david', 'JK', 'KB', 'nina']
for i in team:
    print("%s, %d" % (i, len(i)))

By the way, there's no i in team!

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+1 for the "no i in team" comment, haha! –  tbridge Mar 23 '11 at 1:21

Just do this... nice and simple, no "string formatting" needed.

team = ['sean', 'david', 'JK', 'KB', 'nina']

for i in team:
   print(i, len(i))

if you want comma between, then

team = ['sean', 'david', 'JK', 'KB', 'nina']

for i in team:
   print(i, len(i), sep=', ')

I know this is late, but it's good for other people to see this by googling in the future...

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Try

for i in team:
    print "%s %s" % (i, len(i))

or:

for i in team:
    print i + " " + str(len(i))
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Python 3 - print is a function. And it still works fine, no need to roll the wheel by hand. –  delnan Mar 22 '11 at 21:16
    
oops, missed the 3 part –  miishuu Mar 22 '11 at 21:19

Also i think your original code must be :

for i in team:
   print(i); print(len(i))

instead of :

for i in team:
   print(i), print(len(i))

and if you want to do that with your code , try this :

for i in team:
   print(i,end=','); print(len(i))
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I believe your instruction book mentioned something like:

for i in team:
    print i, len(i)

which gived the expected output in Python 2 but is no longer valid in Python 3.

The 'direct' replacement in Python 3 is:

for i in team:
    print(i, len(i), sep=' ')

but you usually use something else like the %s %d solution proposed above.

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