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In some dynamic languages I have seen this kind of syntax:

myValue = if (this.IsValidObject)
{
    UpdateGraph();
    UpdateCount();
    this.Name;
}
else
{
    Debug.Log (Exceptions.UninitializedObject);
    3;
}

Basically being able to return the last statement in a branch as the return value for a variable, not necessarily only for method returns, but they could be achieved as well.

What's the name of this feature?

Can this also be achieved in staticly typed languages such as C#? I know C# has ternary operator, but I mean using if statements, switch statements as shown above.

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Not clear... could you post a real example that you've seen (if it's not that one) ? –  digEmAll Mar 22 '11 at 22:14
3  
Looks like functional programming. Oh and, by the way, it's a freaking awesome "feature". –  otibom Mar 22 '11 at 22:14
    
I could but I forgot where I saw it. But what's not clear? I can update it to make it more obvious. –  Joan Venge Mar 22 '11 at 22:15
    
Also updated to code to return different values. –  Joan Venge Mar 22 '11 at 22:16
1  
digEmAll, I'm familiar with this from both Ruby and Erlang. –  sarnold Mar 22 '11 at 22:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It is called "conditional-branches-are-expressions" or "death to the statement/expression divide".

See Conditional If Expressions:

Many languages support if expressions, which are similar to if statements, but return a value as a result. Thus, they are true expressions (which evaluate to a value), not statements (which just perform an action).

That is, if (expr) { ... } is an expression (could possible be an expression or a statement depending upon context) in the language grammar just as ?: is an expression in languages like C, C# or Java.

This form is common in functional programming languages (which eschew side-effects) -- however, it is not "functional programming" per se and exists in other language that accept/allow a "functional like syntax" while still utilizing heavy side-effects and other paradigms (e.g. Ruby).

Some languages like Perl allow this behavior to be simulated. That is, $x = eval { if (true) { "hello world!" } else { "goodbye" } }; print $x will display "hello world!" because the eval expression evaluates to the last value evaluated inside even though the if grammar production itself is not an expression. ($x = if ... is a syntax error in Perl).

Happy coding.

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Thanks pst. Btw do you know the difference between statements and expressions? –  Joan Venge Mar 22 '11 at 22:20
5  
@Joan Venge A statement is a production which has no resultant type (this differs from a production which has a 'null' or 'empty' value) and is thus generally (in all popular languages I know of) a restricted production (e.g. not allowed) where an expression is required. E.g. x = statement -> KABOOM! –  user166390 Mar 22 '11 at 22:22
    
Thanks pst, very informative. –  Joan Venge Mar 22 '11 at 22:24

Can this also be achieved in staticly typed languages?

Sure, the types of the involved expressions can be statically and strictly checked. There seems to be nothing dependent on dynamic typing in the "if-as-expression" approach.

For example, Haskell--a strict statically typed language with a rich system of types:

$ ghci
Prelude> let x = if True then "a" else "b" in x
"a"

(the example expression could be simpler, I just wanted to reflect the assignment from your question, but the expression to demonstrate the feature could be simlpler:

Prelude> if True then "a" else "b"
"a"

.)

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In addition to returning the value of the last expression in a branch, it's likely (depending on the language) that myValue is being assigned to an anonymous function -- or in Smalltalk / Ruby, code blocks:

A block of code (an anonymous function) can be expressed as a literal value (which is an object, since all values are objects.)

In this case, since myValue is actually pointing to a function that gets invoked only when myValue is used, the language probably implements them as closures, which are originally a feature of functional languages.

Because closures are first-class functions with free variables, closures exist in C#. However, the implicit return does not occur; in C# they're simply anonymous delegates! Consider:

Func<Object> myValue = delegate() 
{
    if (this.IsValidObject)
    {
        UpdateGraph();
        UpdateCount();
        return this.Name;
    }
    else
    {
        Debug.Log (Exceptions.UninitializedObject);
        return 3;
    }
};

This can also be done in C# using lambda expressions:

Func<Object> myValue = () => 
{
    if (this.IsValidObject) { ... }
    else                    { ... }
};

I realize your question is asking about the implicit return value, but I am trying to illustrate that there is more than just "conditional branches are expressions" going on here.

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It is a ternary conditional.

In C you can use, for example:

printf("Debug? %s\n", debug?"yes":"no");

Edited:

A compound statement list can be evaluated as a expression in C. The last statement should be a expression and the whole compound statement surrounded by braces.

For example:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int a=0, b=1;

    a=({
            printf("testing compound statement\n");
            if(b==a)
                printf("equals\n");
            b+1;
        });

    printf("a=%d\n", a);
    return 0;
}

So the name of the characteristic you are doing is assigning to a (local) variable a compound statement. Now I think this helps you a little bit more. For more, please visit this source: http://www.chemie.fu-berlin.de/chemnet/use/info/gcc/gcc_8.html

Take care, Beco.

PS. This example makes more sense in the context of your question:

a=({
        int c;
        if(b==a)
            c=b+1;
        else
            c=a-1;
        c;
    });
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks but I don't think this is it, because the one I am talking about more branching than if, else also allows you to execute anything in between. –  Joan Venge Mar 22 '11 at 22:19
1  
Dear Joan, I think that if-as-expression is just a special case of the compound-statement-as-expression. The ternary operator do the first case, as you can see in the wikipedia page cited in the answer you accepted. But the compound statement is more powerful than the operator and could do more than a simple if. But in any case, I hope my examples helped you a little bit. Thanks. –  Dr Beco Mar 23 '11 at 0:49
    
Thanks Dr Beco appreciate your help. –  Joan Venge Mar 23 '11 at 18:50

To answer your other question:

Can this also be achieved in staticly typed languages such as C#?

Is it a thing the language supports? No. Can it be achieved? Kind of.

C# --like C++, Java, and all that ilk-- has expressions and statements. Statements, like if-then and switch-case, don't return values and there fore can't be used as expressions. Also, as a slight aside, your example assigns myValue to either a string or an integer, which C# can't do because it is strongly typed. You'd either have to use object myValue and then accept the casting and boxing costs, use var myValue (which is still static typed, just inferred), or some other bizarre cleverness.

Anyway, so if if-then is a statement, how do you do that in C#? You'd have to build a method to accomplish the goal of if-then-else. You could use a static method as an extension to bools, to model the Smalltalk way of doing it:

public static T IfTrue(this bool value, Action doThen, Action doElse ) { if(value) return doThen(); else return doElse(); }

To use this, you'd do something like

var myVal = (6 < 7).IfTrue(() => return "Less than", () => return "Greater than");
  • Disclaimer: I tested none of that, so it may not quite work due to typos, but I think the principle is correct.

The new IfTrue() function checks the boolean it is attached to and executes one of two delegates passed into it. They must have the same return type, and neither accepts arguments (use closures, so it won't matter).

Now, should you do that? No, almost certainly not. Its not the proper C# way of doing things so it's confusing, and its much less efficient than using an if-then. You're trading off something like 1 IL instruction for a complex mess of classes and method calls that .NET will build behind the scenes to support that.

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1  
That make my eyes bleed -- but an interesting exercise (+1). SmallTalk conditionals operate similar to the above proposed (Conditions in Smalltalk) but the SmallTalk syntax was designed with this common idiom in mind. OTOH, Scala has a language grammar which can (although usually not recommended) be used to write code that looks very similar to Java (or C# even) while allowing conditional control structures to be used as expressions. However, Scala is not Java and C# is C# :-) –  user166390 Mar 22 '11 at 23:03
    
As an aside to my aside, in C# you can't really assign either a string or an int to a variable, but that doesn't mean other languages (and maybe future C#) can't while still being static,strongly typed. F# (and other functional languages) have unions that let you treat myVal as either type in a safe way, and the C-omega research project (where LINQ derived from) allowed something similar. –  CodexArcanum Mar 23 '11 at 20:12

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