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I've been struggling with getting a div container element to center along with it's child content and is starting to get frustrating. The inline styling I have for div is as follows:

    <body id="body1" style="vertical-align: middle; text-align: center">
        <div id="container" style="position: relative; width: 910px; margin: 0px auto;">
             <!---Child Content--->      
    .
    .
.
</div>
    </body>

When these settings are viewed in IE7, the div container is off-set to the right as the below pic shows:

enter image description here

In order to center it I have to add define the right property in its position style in order to push it toward the center:

    <body id="body1" style="vertical-align: middle; text-align: center">
        <div id="container" style="position: relative; right: 425px; width: 910px; margin: 0px auto;">
<!---Child Content--->      
        .
        .
    .
        </div>
    </body>

This fixes the problem for IE7:

enter image description here

Predictably however, the formatting is off in IE8, Firefox, Chrome, etc. when applying the second styling format above:

Firefox (same behavior in Chrome and IE8)

enter image description here

Hope it's a simple fix, I don't understand why IE7 treats the styling differently. Any help is appreciated.

UPDATE:

@Dan Hardy, adrift - If I could accept both your answers I would, thanks guys it worked. That is very strange behavior, I figured by now I wouldn't have to cater to specific browsers.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you put !ie7 after the width attribute, it will be ignored by browsers other than IE 7:

right: 425px !ie7;

For a better explanation of this, see this SO question and the accepted answer:

Bang IE7 - What does it mean?

I leave it to you to decide whether this is too 'hacky', but it is used in the Stack Overflow css.

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I really like shorthand notation and try to use it when I can. –  kingrichard2005 Mar 22 '11 at 23:15

This paves the way for a fix, but isn't strictly a fix:

You can add conditional browser specific statements into your HTML code:

http://css-tricks.com/how-to-create-an-ie-only-stylesheet/

Basically what you can do is add the comment's below to your page:

<!--[if IE 7]>
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="conditional_ie_7_stylesheet.css" />
<![endif]-->

Between those tags you could add the necessary styling to offset the issues on specific browsers.

As I've said, this doesn't fix your CSS problem but it provides an alternative.

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Thanks for your help and resources Daniel, I'll keep this approach and link handy. –  kingrichard2005 Mar 22 '11 at 22:36
    
After reading more in the link adrift provided, I see that that particular approach, although it fixes the issue, is considered a non-standard hack. I want to try to stick to standard, just a personal style, so I'll probably change to the format you provided. –  kingrichard2005 Mar 22 '11 at 23:19
    
I suppose the difference between my solution and the accepted solution is - if you have a large amount of styles you need to change, you could collect them all in a specific stylesheet as above. If you are only changing one or two little things then the accepted solution works just as well! –  Dan Hanly Mar 23 '11 at 8:33

Was able to get the html in the original question to work fine in IE7 when you remove the position: relative from the div. There is also the chance that there are interactions in the content html/css that is causing the underlying issue so if this doesn't fix it could you post the content html/css that you have that demonstrates the issue in the screenshots that would be helpful.

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Thanks Aliester, the code is actually for a template that will be applied across several pages, one of the requirements is to have the container div be relatively positioned. –  kingrichard2005 Mar 22 '11 at 22:40

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