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I need a program, that will make my CPU run at 100%.

Preferably in C, a tiny program, that will make the CPU run at 100%, and one, that is not "optimized" by the compiler, so it does nothing.

Suggestions?

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1  
If you are on *nix then the yes program should do just that for you –  zellio Mar 22 '11 at 23:44
    
I need the program to heat the computer. It sounds strange, I know. The laptop in question is out on my balcony. I need to heat it during night time, so moisture doesn't kill it and it doesn't, well freeze. –  polemon Mar 23 '11 at 4:54

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted
int main(void) {
  volatile unsigned x=0, y=1;
  while (x++ || y++);
  return 0;
}

Or, if you have a multi-core processor -- untested ... just like the one above :)

int main(void) {
#pragma omp parallel
  {
    volatile unsigned x=0, y=1;
    while (x++ || y++);
  }
  return 0;
}
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Challenge accepted. –  polemon Mar 23 '11 at 0:12

What about this one:

int main() { for (;;); }
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Here's a good, old-fashioned fork bomb.

#include <unistd.h>
int main(void)
{
  while(1)
    fork();
  return 0;
}
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3  
he said "run at 100%", not "die in a heap"! –  Alnitak Mar 22 '11 at 23:43
    
I took a look at his avatar and made an educated guess :) –  Zomgie Mar 22 '11 at 23:44
1  
anyhow, for a real fork bomb try this in Bash - :(){ :|:& };: –  Alnitak Mar 22 '11 at 23:47
    
Agreed. That's one of my favorite snippets of code. –  Zomgie Mar 22 '11 at 23:48
    
This one uses more like 100000%... –  R.. Mar 23 '11 at 0:14

Copy and paste this in a file named source.c:

int main(int argc, char *argv) {
    while(1);
}

Compile source.c: gcc source.c -o myprogram

Run it: ./myprogram

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1  
You don't need the include ... or main arguments for that matter –  pmg Mar 22 '11 at 23:41
    
Why does it need stdio.h? –  Carl Norum Mar 22 '11 at 23:41

The answers suggesting an empty loop shall only bring dual core CPU to 50%, quad-core to 25% etc.

So if that is an issue one can use something like

void main(void)
{
    omp_set_dynamic(0);
    // In most implemetations omp_get_num_procs() return #cores 
    omp_set_num_threads(omp_get_num_procs());
    #pragma omp parallel for
    for(;;) {}
}
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5  
void main RAAAAGRRRRGGGHHHH! –  pmg Mar 23 '11 at 0:00
1  
If something calls an extern "C" function that never returns, how can it tell that this function returns the wrong thing? –  please delete me Mar 23 '11 at 0:10
    
-1 for void main UB. Also only a broken OMP implementation would parallelize a loop with no side effects. –  R.. Mar 23 '11 at 0:15
    
Care to provide the relevant paragraph from OpenMP spec? –  horsh Mar 23 '11 at 0:19

Native Windows solution for multithreaded systems. Compiles on Visual C++ (or Visual Studio) without any library.

/* Use 100% CPU on multithreaded Windows systems */

#include <Windows.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#define NUM_THREADS 4

DWORD WINAPI mythread(__in LPVOID lpParameter)
{
    printf("Thread inside %d \n", GetCurrentThreadId());
    volatile unsigned x = 0, y = 1;
    while (x++ || y++);
    return 0;
}


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    HANDLE handles[NUM_THREADS];
    DWORD mythreadid[NUM_THREADS];
    int i;

    for (i = 0; i < NUM_THREADS; i++)
    {
        handles[i] = CreateThread(0, 0, mythread, 0, 0, &mythreadid[i]);
        printf("Thread after %d \n", mythreadid[i]);
    }

    getchar();
    return 0;
}
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