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Consider this simplified example:

#include <list>

typedef std::list<int> IntList;

class KindaIntList {
    public:
        IntList::const_iterator begin() const { /* do some stuff */ }
        IntList::const_iterator end() const { /* do some stuff */ }
        // ...etc
};

The KindaIntList class implements some of the methods of the STL list.

Now, I have a function

void f(IntList l) {
    // do stuff
}

which only calls methods that are implemented by KindaIntList. I would like to be able to call it with an IntList or with a KindaIntList argument. Is that possible?

I thought about using templates, but the definition of f is quite large and I don't want to put it in a header file (f is a member of a class, and I don't want it to be inlined).

Edit

The function f is actually a virtual member of another class; so I'm not sure how to make it into a template member.

share|improve this question
    
"and I don't want it to be inlined" Why? –  GManNickG Mar 22 '11 at 23:41
    
You can't without templates. –  Erik Mar 22 '11 at 23:42
    
I don't think you should be concerned about inline that long function, because putting it in the header (with templates) do not always mean it is implemented inline by the compiler. Actually, modern compilers will only inline functions if they are simple (and short) enough. Otherwise, it will be treated as a normal function regardless the definition location or even the use of the inline keyword. –  Emmanuel Valle Mar 22 '11 at 23:44
    
@GMan Because f is quite large. I don't want multiple copies of that code in my executable. –  Arek' Fu Mar 22 '11 at 23:45
1  
Why are you doubting your compiler? It knows how to inline much better than you. If it's large, it won't inline it, if it's small, it will. You shouldn't be the judge of whether or not it's worth it. –  GManNickG Mar 22 '11 at 23:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Despite your misgivings about templates, this really is an appropriate spot to use C++ templates. Template functions perfectly capture the notion of "this function works with any arguments, as long as the operations I perform on those arguments are well-defined."

You don't need to worry about inlining in this case. Unless you define f inside of the body of a class, it won't automatically be inlined, even if it's a template. For example, in this code:

class MyClass {
public:
     template <typename T> void f(T&);
};

template <typename T> void MyClass::f(T&) {
    /* ... implementation ... */
}

Because f isn't defined inside of the MyClass body, it's not considered an inline function.

As for your concern about making the header file too large, I contend that this really isn't something to worry about. If you're worried about making the header too large, you can either put a big comment about halfway down saying something like

 /* * * * * Implementation Below This Point * * * * */

Alternatively, you could make a separate .h file for the template implementation, then #include that file at the bottom of the header file. This shields the client from seeing the template implementations unless they actively go looking for it.

Hope this helps!

EDIT: If f is virtual, then you cannot make it a template function (as you've probably figured out). Consequently, if you want to make it work for "things that happen to look like std::list," then you don't have many good options. Normally you'd create a base class for both std::list and your custom list type, but this isn't an option as you can't modify std::list.

Fortunately, there is a way to treat std::list and things that look like it polymorphically using a trick called external polymorphism. The idea is that while you can't make the appropriate classes behave polymorphically, you can add an extra layer of indirection around those objects by introducing a polymorphic class hierarchy that just forwards all its requests to the objects that themselves are not polymorphic.

If you're willing to pull out the Big Template Guns, you can encapsulate this logic inside of a class that works much the same way as the new std::function template type. The idea is as follows. First, we'll create a polymorphic base class that exports all the functions you want to call as pure virtual functions:

class List {
public:
    virtual ~List() {}

    virtual std::list<int>::const_iterator begin() const = 0;
    virtual std::list<int>::const_iterator end() const = 0;

    virtual void push_back(int value) = 0;

    /* ... etc. ... */
};

Now, we can define a template subclass of List that implements all of the public interface by forwarding all of the calls to an object of the actual type. For example:

template <typename T> class ListImpl: public List {
private:
    T& mImpl; // Actual object that does the work
public:
    /* Constructor stores a reference to the object that actually does the work. */
    ListImpl(T& impl) : mImpl(impl) {
         // Handled in initializer list
    }

    /* These functions all forward the requests to the implementation object. */
    virtual std::list<int>::const_iterator begin() const {
         return mImpl.begin();
    }
    virtual std::list<int>::const_iterator end() const {
         return mImpl.end();
    }
    virtual void push_back(int value) {
         mImpl.push_back(value);
    }

    /* ... etc. ... */
};

Now that you have this wrapper, you can implement f so that it takes in a List:

class MyClass {
public:
    void f(List* myList) {
        myList->push_back(137); // For example
    }
};

And you can call this function on an object that looks like a list by first wrapping it in an object of type ListImpl. For exmaple:

MyClass mc;
std::list<int> myList;
MyIntList myIntList;

mc->f(new ListImpl<std::list<int> >(myList));
mc->f(new ListImpl<MyIntList>(myIntList));

Of course, this is bulky and unwieldy. You also have to worry about resource leaks, which aren't very fun. Fortunately, you can solve this by wrapping up all the logic to deal with List and ListImpl in a helper class, like this one here:

class ListWrapper {
public:
    template <typename ListType> ListWrapper(ListType& list) {
        /* Store a wrapper of the appropriate type. */
        mImpl = new ListImpl<ListType>(list);
    }

    /* Delete the associated implementation object. */
    ~ListWrapper() {
        delete mImpl;
    }

    /* For each interface function, provide our own wrapper to forward the logic
     * to the real implementation object.
     */
    std::list<int>::const_iterator begin() const {
        return mImpl->begin();
    }
    std::list<int>::const_iterator end() const {
        return mImpl->end();
    }
    void push_back(int value) {
        mImpl->push_back(value);
    }

    /* ... etc. ... */

    /* Copy functions necessary to avoid serious memory issues. */
    ListWrapper(const ListWrapper& rhs) {
        mImpl = rhs.mImpl->clone();
    }
    ListWrapper& operator= (const ListWrapper& rhs) {
        if (this != &rhs) {
             delete mImpl;
             mImpl = rhs.mImpl->clone();
        }
        return *this;
    }

private:
    List* mImpl; // Pointer to polymorphic wrapper
};

You can now write f to take in a ListWrapper like this:

class MyClass {
public:
    virtual void f(ListWrapper list) {
        list.push_back(137); // For example
    }
};

(This assumes that you've updated List and ListImpl with a virtual clone function that makes a copy of the object, which I've omitted for brevity's sake).

And magically, this code is now legal (and safe!):

MyClass mc;
std::list<int> myList;
MyIntList myIntList;

mc.f(myList);
mc.f(myIntList);

This code works because the template constructor for ListWrapper will automatically infer the type of its argument and implicitly create an object of type ListImpl appropriate for that object. It also encapsulates the memory management for you, so you never see any explicit news or deletes. Moreover, it means that you can pass in any object that you'd like and everything will work automatically - we've essentially made anything that looks like a list polymorphic by using a parallel class hierarchy!

Whew! That was fun! Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Though it's arguably misguided to place the function outside the class definition just to avoid it being tagged as inline, there's no cost to it. (On a side note, I've seen .tpp used for template implementations.) –  GManNickG Mar 22 '11 at 23:51
    
@GMan- That is true, but the OP specifically requested inlining as a reason to avoid templates and I thought I'd point out that it is indeed possible to put it in a header without it being declared inline. –  templatetypedef Mar 22 '11 at 23:52
    
@template: Oh, no doubt, you did well. :) Just felt a criticism of avoiding inline was missing, now it exists in the comments. :) –  GManNickG Mar 23 '11 at 0:14
    
Ah, but unfortunately f is virtual. I have edited the question to reflect this. –  Arek' Fu Mar 23 '11 at 0:44
    
@Arek' Fu- I just updated my answer to have a solution in that case. It's pretty dense, but I really like this technique. Can you look over this answer again and see if it helps? –  templatetypedef Mar 23 '11 at 1:02

You could overload f to either take IntList and KindaIntList like this:

void f(IntList l){...}
void f(KindaIntList l){...}

Or make it take iterators:

void f(IntList::iterator first, IntList::iterator last){...}

That said, templates are really the best choice here, for both cases:

template<class ListT>
void f(ListT l){...}
template<class Iter>
void f(Iter first, Iter last){...}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, but overloading leads to code duplication. It really sound like templates are the best solution. –  Arek' Fu Mar 22 '11 at 23:47
    
@Arek: Not necessarily, just look at the iterator version. if both provide the same iterators (and it seems that way from your posted code) than you only need that one function. :) And even if not, if you split f int to nice subroutines and can work out an arbitary way for those subroutines to do their job, the code duplication isn't actually that much. But still, still templates are obviously the cleaner choice. :) –  Xeo Mar 22 '11 at 23:59

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