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unsafe static void SquarePtrParam (int* p) 
   {
      *p *= *p;
   }

VS

static void SquarePtrParam (ref int p) 
   {
      p *= p;
   }
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6  
More asterisks? –  Mehrdad Mar 23 '11 at 0:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Safe code can run in any situation where you can run C# code (Silverlight, shared hosting ASP.NET, XNA, SQL Server, etc.), while unsafe code require elevated trust. This means you can run your code in more places and with fewer restrictions.

Also, it's safe, meaning you don't have to worry about doing something wrong and crashing your process.

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2  
I think you might have inverted the question... –  forsvarir Mar 22 '11 at 23:45
3  
@forsvarir: There is no advantage to using unsafe code in this situation, so I told him the advantage of using safe code instead. –  Gabe Mar 22 '11 at 23:49

Your example is not a good one, the JIT compiler already generates the code like that. Under the hood references are pointers too. This needed to be fast, managed code would never have been competitive.

The garbage collected heap is pretty incompatible with pointers, you have to pin objects to make it possible to create a pointer to them. Without the pinning, the garbage collector could move the object and your code randomly fails, destroying the heap integrity. Pinning has a non-zero cost, both in the operation and the loss of efficiency you'll suffer, well after you unpinned, when a garbage collection happens while an object is pinned.

Pointers are highly effective when accessing unmanaged memory. The canonical example is image processing that requires accessing the pixels of a bitmap. And it is a way to quickly access pinned arrays with all the safety interlocks removed, array index checking isn't free when you don't iterate them.

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I thought the cost of pinning is zero so long as there is no garbage collection, isn't it? –  Mehrdad Mar 23 '11 at 0:14
    
@Mehrdad - Creating a GCHandle is not free. –  Hans Passant Mar 23 '11 at 0:29
    
I meant a fixed pointer, not a GCHandle. –  Mehrdad Mar 23 '11 at 0:40
    
There's got to be some cost to pinning an object, otherwise it would be a NOP. The question is what cost. The BCL makes extensive use of fixed pointers in classes like String and BitConverter so I would imagine that the cost can't be too high. –  Gabe Mar 23 '11 at 4:54
    
Now that I think about it, the fixed part could just be metadata that's used by the GC. The JITter could store information that the value in a certain register at a certain point in the code points to an object that can't be relocated. Thus, the use of fixed could add extra metadata overhead and extra work for the GC, but not consume CPU cycles when executing. –  Gabe Dec 18 '11 at 5:56

There's only one reason for using unsafe code: Raw performance.

Using unsafe code, you can use C++ like pointers, without very much checking by the runtime. No checks means you are on your own, but there's less overhead.

I've only seen it in action for speeding up image/bitmap manipulation. But you could also use it for inline string manipulation (yes, making strings mutable!!! Bad idea anyway unless you want to build StringBuilder). Other usages include matrix calculations or other heavy mathematics. And probably interfacing with the OS, and some hacking.

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1  
There's more than one reason for unsafe code... –  Mehrdad Mar 23 '11 at 0:13

A perfect example is described in book J.Richter "CLR via C#", 3 edition, Ch. 16: The following C# code demonstrates three techniques (safe, jagged, and unsafe), for accessing a two-dimensional array:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

public static class Program {
    private const Int32 c_numElements = 10000;

    public static void Main() {
        const Int32 testCount = 10;
        Stopwatch sw;

        // Declare a two-dimensional array
        Int32[,] a2Dim = new Int32[c_numElements, c_numElements];
        // Declare a two-dimensional array as a jagged array (a vector of vectors)
        Int32[][] aJagged = new Int32[c_numElements][];
        for (Int32 x = 0; x < c_numElements; x++)
            aJagged[x] = new Int32[c_numElements];

        // 1: Access all elements of the array using the usual, safe technique
        sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (Int32 test = 0; test < testCount; test++)
            Safe2DimArrayAccess(a2Dim);
        Console.WriteLine("{0}: Safe2DimArrayAccess", sw.Elapsed);

        // 2: Access all elements of the array using the jagged array technique
        sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (Int32 test = 0; test < testCount; test++)
            SafeJaggedArrayAccess(aJagged);
        Console.WriteLine("{0}: SafeJaggedArrayAccess", sw.Elapsed);

        // 3: Access all elements of the array using the unsafe technique
        sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (Int32 test = 0; test < testCount; test++)
            Unsafe2DimArrayAccess(a2Dim);
        Console.WriteLine("{0}: Unsafe2DimArrayAccess", sw.Elapsed);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    private static Int32 Safe2DimArrayAccess(Int32[,] a) {
        Int32 sum = 0;
        for (Int32 x = 0; x < c_numElements; x++) {
            for (Int32 y = 0; y < c_numElements; y++) {
                sum += a[x, y];
            }
        }

        return sum;
    }

    private static Int32 SafeJaggedArrayAccess(Int32[][] a) {
        Int32 sum = 0;
        for (Int32 x = 0; x < c_numElements; x++) {
            for (Int32 y = 0; y < c_numElements; y++) {
                sum += a[x][y];
            }
        }

        return sum;
    }

    private static unsafe Int32 Unsafe2DimArrayAccess(Int32[,] a) {
        Int32 sum = 0;
        fixed (Int32* pi = a) {
            for (Int32 x = 0; x < c_numElements; x++) {
                Int32 baseOfDim = x * c_numElements;
                for (Int32 y = 0; y < c_numElements; y++) {
                    sum += pi[baseOfDim + y];
                }
            }
        }

        return sum;
    }
}

The Unsafe2DimArrayAccess method is marked with the unsafe modifier, which is required to use C#’s fixed statement. To compile this code, you’ll have to specify the /unsafe switch when invoking the C# compiler or check the “Allow Unsafe Code” check box on the Build tab of the Project Properties pane in Microsoft Visual Studio. When I run this program on my machine, I get the following output:

00:00:02.0017692: Safe2DimArrayAccess
00:00:01.5197844: SafeJaggedArrayAccess
00:00:01.7343436: Unsafe2DimArrayAccess

As you can see, the safe two-dimensional array access technique is the slowest. The safe jagged array access technique takes a little less time to complete than the safe two-dimensional array access technique. However, you should note that creating the jagged array is more time-consuming than creating the multi-dimensional array because creating the jagged array requires an object to be allocated on the heap for each dimension, causing the garbage collector to kick in periodically. So there is a trade-off: If you need to create a lot of “multidimensional arrays” and you intend to access the elements infrequently, it is quicker to create a multi-dimensional array. If you need to create the “multi-dimensional array” just once, and you access its elements frequently, a jagged array will give you better performance. Certainly, in most applications, the latter scenario is more common.

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I don't think there is an advantage to using unsafe code in the example you've given. I've only really used unsafe code when I've needed to interact with unmanaged code, for example when calling out to non-com dll interfaces.

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1  
You generally don't need unsafe code for interop (COM or P/Invoke). You can almost always use ref or out instead of pointers. –  P Daddy Mar 22 '11 at 23:56

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