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I am having some difficulty with these two functions: byteArrayToInt and intToByteArray.

The problem is that if I use one to get to another and that result to get to the former, the results ares different, as you can see from my examples below.

I cannot find the bug in the code. Any ideas are very welcome.

Thanks.

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    int a = 123;
    byte[] aBytes = intToByteArray(a);
    int a2 = byteArrayToInt(aBytes);

    System.out.println(a);         // prints '123'
    System.out.println(aBytes);    // prints '[B@459189e1'
    System.out.println(a2);        // prints '2063597568
            System.out.println(intToByteArray(a2));  // prints '[B@459189e1'
}

public static int byteArrayToInt(byte[] b) 
{
    int value = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
        int shift = (4 - 1 - i) * 8;
        value += (b[i] & 0x000000FF) << shift;
    }
    return value;
}

public static byte[] intToByteArray(int a)
{
    byte[] ret = new byte[4];
    ret[0] = (byte) (a & 0xFF);   
    ret[1] = (byte) ((a >> 8) & 0xFF);   
    ret[2] = (byte) ((a >> 16) & 0xFF);   
    ret[3] = (byte) ((a >> 24) & 0xFF);
    return ret;
}
share|improve this question
    
Try removing the loop in byteArrayToInt. –  Ralph Wiggum Mar 23 '11 at 1:18

8 Answers 8

up vote 22 down vote accepted

You're swapping endianness between your two methods. You have intToByteArray(int a) assigning the low-order bits into ret[0], but then byteArrayToInt(byte[] b) assigns b[0] to the high-order bits of the result. You need to invert one or the other, like:

public static byte[] intToByteArray(int a)
{
    byte[] ret = new byte[4];
    ret[3] = (byte) (a & 0xFF);   
    ret[2] = (byte) ((a >> 8) & 0xFF);   
    ret[1] = (byte) ((a >> 16) & 0xFF);   
    ret[0] = (byte) ((a >> 24) & 0xFF);
    return ret;
}
share|improve this answer
5  
+1 good point about the byte ordering –  Yanick Rochon Mar 23 '11 at 2:00
4  
Take a look at the ByteBuffer class, I've created an example around it. –  Maarten Bodewes Jul 30 '12 at 0:30

Your methods should be (something like)

public static int byteArrayToInt(byte[] b) 
{
    return   b[3] & 0xFF |
            (b[2] & 0xFF) << 8 |
            (b[1] & 0xFF) << 16 |
            (b[0] & 0xFF) << 24;
}

public static byte[] intToByteArray(int a)
{
    return new byte[] {
        (byte) ((a >> 24) & 0xFF),
        (byte) ((a >> 16) & 0xFF),   
        (byte) ((a >> 8) & 0xFF),   
        (byte) (a & 0xFF)
    };
}

These methods were tested with the following code :

Random rand = new Random(System.currentTimeMillis());
byte[] b;
int a, v;
for (int i=0; i<10000000; i++) {
    a = rand.nextInt();
    b = intToByteArray(a);
    v = byteArrayToInt(b);
    if (a != v) {
        System.out.println("ERR! " + a + " != " + Arrays.toString(b) + " != " + v);
    }
}
System.out.println("Done!");
share|improve this answer
    
Take a look at the ByteBuffer class, I've created an example around it. –  Maarten Bodewes Jul 30 '12 at 0:30
    
@owlstead, yes, your code would work best to convert a byte[] into int[], however for isolated conversion of byte to int, using direct bit manipulation (especially when you know and expect the defined data to be properly formed) is a way lot faster than creating an instance of a class to do the exact same thing for each call. Even if you cache an instance of ByteBuffer, you'd still have to copy the passing bytes to the buffer's array, thus gives you some overhead in any case. –  Yanick Rochon Jul 30 '12 at 17:25
    
On my not so fast machine that would mean 85 ms for 1000000 calls of each (and that's with a "cold start"). A small price to pay for a method that doesn't leave any questions about what it does (but that's my opinion). –  Maarten Bodewes Jul 30 '12 at 17:34
1  
@owlstead, perhaps, but if you can optimize a method from the start, and it is a really simple one, why would you settle for less? You don't need a reusable pattern here.. and, besides, the accumulation of "small price to pay" can escalate quite fast in a big project. Think about it. –  Yanick Rochon Jul 30 '12 at 17:37
1  
@WaffleStealer654: That's needed because Java bytes are signed, so if the top bit is on it's a negative number with one bits in all the high-order bits when converted to an int. (The fact that Java bytes are signed is, well, to be polite, non-optimal in my opinion, but that's the way they are.) –  RenniePet Feb 24 at 14:39

That's a lot of work for:

public static int byteArrayToInt(byte[] b) {
    final ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.wrap(b);
    bb.order(ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN);
    return bb.getInt();
}

public static byte[] intToByteArray(int i) {
    final ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.allocate(Integer.SIZE / Byte.SIZE);
    bb.order(ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN);
    bb.putInt(i);
    return bb.array();
}

I've shown Little Endian byte order in case that's required, leave it out for Big Endian.

Or, in code where performance is required (about 10x as fast, but BIG ENDIAN):

public static int byteArrayToInt(byte[] encodedValue) {
    int index = 0;
    int value = encodedValue[index++] << Byte.SIZE * 3;
    value ^= (encodedValue[index++] & 0xFF) << Byte.SIZE * 2;
    value ^= (encodedValue[index++] & 0xFF) << Byte.SIZE * 1;
    value ^= (encodedValue[index++] & 0xFF);
    return value;
}

public static byte[] intToByteArray(int value) {
    int index = 0;
    byte[] encodedValue = new byte[Integer.SIZE / Byte.SIZE];
    encodedValue[index++] = (byte) (value >> Byte.SIZE * 3);
    encodedValue[index++] = (byte) (value >> Byte.SIZE * 2);   
    encodedValue[index++] = (byte) (value >> Byte.SIZE);   
    encodedValue[index++] = (byte) value;
    return encodedValue;
}

Note that the index is easily optimized out by the compiler.

share|improve this answer
    
One liner: byte[] result = ByteBuffer.allocate(Integer.SIZE / Byte.SIZE).order(ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN).putInt(i).array(); –  Maarten Bodewes Jul 10 '12 at 18:57
    
OK, so there was an interesting discussion with Yanick about performance, so I've added a performance enhanced version, using Yanick's answer (upvoted) as base. The most important change is the removal of the for loop of course, as branching is slow on current CPU's. It's therefore at least twice as fast. –  Maarten Bodewes Jul 30 '12 at 18:07
    
First of all, sorry for being asking something like this here, but is your ByteBuffer class available for the public? :) –  Raphael C. Nov 17 '12 at 23:03
1  
@RaphaelC. It's in the standard JRE, in java.nio package... –  Maarten Bodewes Nov 18 '12 at 0:46
    
Oh, I see.. Thanks –  Raphael C. Nov 19 '12 at 15:09

You can also use BigInteger for variable length bytes. You can convert it to Long, Integer or Short, whichever suits your needs.

new BigInteger(bytes).intValue();

or to denote polarity:

new BigInteger(1, bytes).intValue();

To get bytes back just:

new BigInteger(bytes).toByteArray()
share|improve this answer

I like owlstead's original answer, and if you don't like the idea of creating a ByteBuffer on every method call then you can reuse the ByteBuffer by calling it's .clear() and .flip() methods:

ByteBuffer _intShifter = ByteBuffer.allocate(Integer.SIZE / Byte.SIZE)
                                   .order(ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN);

public byte[] intToByte(int value) {
    _intShifter.clear();
    _intShifter.putInt(value);      
    return _intShifter.array();
}

public int byteToInt(byte[] data)
{
    _intShifter.clear();
    _intShifter.put(data, 0, Integer.SIZE / Byte.SIZE);
    _intShifter.flip();
    return _intShifter.getInt();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yup, just don't re-use the buffer in multi-threaded code, that would get you in trouble. –  Maarten Bodewes Feb 1 at 22:22

here is my implementation

public static byte[] intToByteArray(int a) {
    return BigInteger.valueOf(a).toByteArray();
}

public static int byteArrayToInt(byte[] b) {
    return new BigInteger(b).intValue();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
-1, this will return a different result than asked (it returns the minimum number of bytes instead of 4 bytes). Furthermore, using BigInteger is a bit heavy for this kind of purpose. –  Maarten Bodewes Jul 10 '12 at 18:48
    
Not as bad as I expected though, only 20x slower than an optimized version :), mine was not that much faster I must admit. –  Maarten Bodewes Jul 30 '12 at 18:31

I took a long look at many questions like this, and found this post... I didn't like the fact that the conversion code is duplicated for each type, so I've made a generic method to perform the task:

public static byte[] toByteArray(long value, int n)
{
    byte[] ret = new byte[n];
    ret[n-1] = (byte) ((value >> (0*8) & 0xFF);   
    ret[n-2] = (byte) ((value >> (1*8) & 0xFF);   
    ...
    ret[1] = (byte) ((value >> ((n-2)*8) & 0xFF);   
    ret[0] = (byte) ((value >> ((n-1)*8) & 0xFF);   
    return ret;
}

See full post.

share|improve this answer
    
Obviously it loops... not hand made :) –  TacB0sS Jun 3 '12 at 13:46
  1. First convert the byte array to String.

  2. Then convert the String to integer.

Example:

 byte[] MyByteArray;

 String Str = new String(MyByteArray);

 int Value = Integer.parseInt(Str);

Enjoy :)

share|improve this answer
10  
This is simply incorrect people, in so many ways I don't know why this got upvoted. –  Maarten Bodewes Jul 10 '12 at 18:49
2  
Most troll answer I've ever seen. –  user2889419 Sep 16 '14 at 21:54

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