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I want:

public interface IBase
{
    MyObject Property1 { get; set; }
}

public interface IBaseSub<T> : IBase
{
    new T Property1 { get; set; }
}

public class MyClass : IBaseSub<YourObject>
{
    public YourObject Property1 { get; set; }
}

But this doesn't compile. It gives the error:

//This class must implement the interface member IBase.Property1

Can anyone shed some light on this? I thought it should work..

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

IBaseSub<T> requires IBase. I say "requires" because it more accurately reflects the practical implications than to say it "inherits" IBase, which implies overriding and other things that simply don't happen with interfaces. A class which implements IBaseSub<T> can actually be said to implement both, like so:

public class MyClass : IBase, IBaseSub<YourObject>

Going back to what I said about inheritance - there is no such thing with interfaces, which means just because both interfaces have a property with the same name, the derived one isn't overriding or hiding the base one. It means that your class must now literally implement two properties with the same name to fulfill both contracts. You can do this with explicit implementation:

public class MyClass : IBase, IBaseSub<YourObject>
{
    public YourObject Property1 { get; set; }
    MyObject IBase.Property1 { get; set; }
}
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Okay, I get it. It makes sense with the way both Rex M and Jon explained it. Cheers! –  Chaos Mar 23 '11 at 3:07
    
@user654495 great! If an answer solves your problem, please indicate it to the community by clicking the large check-mark to the left of the answer, underneath the voting buttons. –  Rex M Mar 23 '11 at 14:02
3  
It has been a while.. but I've marked it as the answer now. Sorry =/ –  Chaos Apr 10 '12 at 5:20

You need to implement the properties from both IBase and IBaseSub<YourObject>, since the latter expands on the former.

Using new in IBaseSub<T> does not let you "off the hook" regarding the necessity to have a MyObject Property1 { get; set; }. It simply allows you to declare another property named Property1 that implementors of IBaseSub<T> must have.

Since you cannot have two properties with the same name in MyClass, you will be forced to implement at least one of them explicitly:

public class MyClass : IBaseSub<YourObject>
{
    MyObject IBase.Property1 { get; set; }
    public YourObject Property1 { get; set; }
}
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Why is new allowed? What does it mean for an interface? –  Ritch Melton Mar 23 '11 at 2:39
3  
@Ritch: It's allowed because the standard says so :) and it allows the "derived" interface to define members with the same name as those in the interfaces it "derives" from. –  Jon Mar 23 '11 at 2:42
    
Oh, I guess I could see the use for that. I mean, its a stretch, but I can see it. –  Ritch Melton Mar 23 '11 at 2:43
    
@Ritch Melton: A major use for that is to allow a read-only interface to be extended by a read-write interface. For whatever reason, .net won't allow a read-only property to be usefully extended merely by defining a set method; one must define separate read-only and read-write properties. –  supercat Aug 29 '11 at 14:46

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