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I'm using [self retain] to hold an object itself, and [self release] to free it elsewhere. This is very convenient sometimes. But this is actually a reference-loop, or dead-lock, which most garbage-collection systems target to solve. I wonder if objective-c's autorelease pool may find the loops and give me surprises by release the object before reaching [self release]. Is my way encouraged or not? How can I ensure that the garbage-collection, if there, won't be too smart?

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You probably want to avoid that pattern, except for some very specific cases. Can you please tell us a bit more about the context of your usage? Why would an object self-retain, when it's allocation has to be done from elsewhere? –  Doodloo Mar 23 '11 at 3:04
    
The context is, I'm using sub-class of UIViewController as full-screen model dialog. The parent view issues the dialog, but when the dialog closes, it does need to know the event. –  willzeng Mar 23 '11 at 8:45
    
The context is, I'm using sub-class of UIViewController as full-screen model dialog. The parent view issues the dialog, but when the dialog closes, it does need to know the event. If I directly use UIView instead of UIViewController, there's no such problem since when [self removeFromSupperView], the view's reference count is decreased by one. However, sub-classes of UIViewController can auto-linked to a same-name xib file, that's why I use UIViewController. –  willzeng Mar 23 '11 at 8:55

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This way of working is very discouraged. It looks like you need some pointers on memory management.

Theoretically, an object should live as long as it is useful. Useful objects can easily be spotted: they are directly referenced somewhere on a thread stack, or, if you made a graph of all your objects, reachable through some path linked to an object referenced somewhere on a thread stack. Objects that live "by themselves", without being referenced, cannot be useful, since no thread can reach to them to make them perform something.

This is how a garbage collector works: it traverses your object graph and collects every unreferenced object. Mind you, Objective-C is not always garbage-collected, so some rules had to be established. These are the memory management guidelines for Cocoa.

In short, it is based over the concept of 'ownership'. When you look at the reference count of an object, you immediately know how many other objects depend on it. If an object has a reference count of 3, it means that three other objects need it to work properly (and thus own it). Every time you keep a reference to an object (except in rare conditions), you should call its retain method. And before you drop the reference, you should call its release method.

There are some other importants rule regarding the creation of objects. When you call alloc, copy or mutableCopy, the object you get already has a refcount of 1. In this case, it means the calling code is responsible for releasing the object once it's not required. This can be problematic when you return references to objects: once you return it, in theory, you don't need it anymore, but if you call release on it, it'll be destroyed right away! This is where NSAutoreleasePool objects come in. By calling autorelease on an object, you give up ownership on it (as if you called release), except that the reference is not immediately revoked: instead, it is transferred to the NSAutoreleasePool, that will release it once it receives the release message itself. (Whenever some of your code is called back by the Cocoa framework, you can be assured that an autorelease pool already exists.)

It also means that you do not own objects if you did not call alloc, copy or mutableCopy on them; in other words, if you obtain a reference to such an object otherwise, you don't need to call release on it. If you need to keep around such an object, as usual, call retain on it, and then release when you're done.

Now, if we try to apply this logic to your use case, it stands out as odd. An object cannot logically own itself, as it would mean that it can exist, standalone in memory, without being referenced by a thread. Obviously, if you have the occasion to call release on yourself, it means that one of your methods is being executed; therefore, there's gotta be a reference around for you, so you shouldn't need to retain yourself in the first place. I can't really say with the few details you've given, but you probably need to look into NSAutoreleasePool objects.

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Thanks for the detailed info. I've done some garbage-collection work in C++, so I know the basics of how it work, like maintaining dependences and finding reference closure by starting from stack or global objects. That's why I wonder if objective-c would do the same. I didn't give the context in the question, so here I add it: I'm using sub-classes of UIViewController as dialogs. When a dialog closes, it just call [self.view removeFromSuperView] and doesn't need to notify its owner in most cases. The UIViewController has to find a way to release itself. If objective-c is well-garbage-recycled –  willzeng Mar 23 '11 at 9:10
    
...if objective-c is well-garbage-recycled, self.view should also maintain a ref to self (UIViewController), and before [self.view removeFromSuperView] is called, the reference closure has outer ref (the super view), and won't be released. But after calling [self.view removeFromSuperView], the reference loop (self & self.view) becomes dead closure and hence can be find and released by garbage recycle system. Objective-c's garbage recycling seems to be semi-auto and is not implemented that way, which makes me think it implies the self retain is encouraged? I know one should always try to avoid –  willzeng Mar 23 '11 at 9:22
    
I know one should always try to avoid such cases, but when using legacy codes, such as UIViewController, how to balance convenience and the completeness, if I may say so? –  willzeng Mar 23 '11 at 9:26
    
"Obviously, if you have the occasion to call release on yourself, it means that one of your methods is being executed; therefore, there's gotta be a reference around for you, so you shouldn't need to retain yourself." --- That's quite right! But in my case, the reference, i.e. the one calls onCloseButton, is linked in InterfaceBuilder. We can say the UIView fired the event, so UIViewController is waiting UIView to release it. UIView does the work in UIViewController's onCloseButton, so it becomes [self release]. Is it just a matter of which form you like? –  willzeng Mar 23 '11 at 9:42
    
@willzeng Whew, lot of informations in comments! You may want to edit your question to edit those. –  zneak Mar 23 '11 at 22:15

If you're using the retain/release memory model, it shouldn't be a problem. Nothing will go looking for your [self retain] and subvert it. That may not be the case, however, if you ever switch over to using garbage collection, where -retain and -release are no-ops.

Here's another thread on SO on the same topic.

I'd reiterate the answer that includes the phrase "overwhelming sense of ickyness." It's not illegal, but it feels like a poor plan unless there's a pretty strong reason. If nothing else, it seems sneaky, and that's never good in code. Do heed the warning in that thread to use -autorelease instead of -release.

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