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In the following interview question :

Given a number n, give me the numbers (among 3..5 and an even number of numbers) whose adding would return the original number. The resulting numbers should be as balanced as possible, meaning that instead of returning 3 and 5, for instance, return 4 and 4. Ex:

7 = 3 + 4
16 = 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 rather than 3 + 5 + 4 + 4
24 = 12 + 12 or 6 + 6 + 6 + 6

I thought of the following method:

splitnumber(int n)
{
    //check if the number is even
    if(n%2==0)
    {
        print(n/2,n/2);
        //check if x=2^m multiple exists or
        // not..like 4,8,16 etc
        print (n/x...n/x);
    }
    else //else if the no is odd... this part is incomplete
    {
        if(n-3>0)
        {
            print (3);

        }

        n-=3;
        if(n>0)
        {
            if (n>5)
            {
                print(3)
                n-=3;
            }
        }
    }
}

but still I am not able to complete all the cases... How should I check when the answer has unbalanced solution??

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9  
What an annoying interview question. –  Daniel Mar 23 '11 at 5:04
5  
Bonus points if the job is an html developer. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Mar 23 '11 at 5:06
4  
why is 24 broken down into 6 + 6 + 6 + 6, instead of 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 + 4? –  Anurag Mar 23 '11 at 5:06
    
you can have even integers....yes 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 is an answer as well –  garima Mar 23 '11 at 5:08
    
what does 3..5 mean then if you can use any integer? –  Anurag Mar 23 '11 at 5:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
if (n < 4) print n;
else
    switch (n % 4)
        case 0: *print n/4 4's*
        case 1: *print n/4 - 1 4's* print 5
        case 2: *print n/4 - 1 4's* print 3 print 3
        case 3: *print n/4 4's* print 3

Slightly inefficient implementation in C#

if (n < 4) Console.WriteLine(n);
else
    switch (n % 4)
    {
        case 0:
            Console.WriteLine(String.Join(" ", new string('4', n / 4).ToArray()));
            break;
        case 1:
            Console.WriteLine(
                (String.Join(" ", new string('4', n/4).ToArray().Skip(1)) + 
                " 5").TrimStart());
            break;
        case 2:
            Console.WriteLine(
                (String.Join(" ", new string('4', n/4).ToArray().Skip(1)) + 
                " 3 3").TrimStart());
            break;
        case 3:
            Console.WriteLine(String.Join(" ", new string('4', n/4).ToArray() + 
                " 3"));
            break;

    }
share|improve this answer
2  
Doesn't the solution have to print an even number of numbers? If n = 11 this prints 4 4 3 –  srgerg Mar 23 '11 at 5:56
    
@srgerg didn't notice that note. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Mar 23 '11 at 12:52
    
There is no solution for 11 with only the number 3,4 and 5 and a even number of numbers. –  Alex Reche Martinez Mar 23 '11 at 16:17
1  
Why did the OP mark it as an accepted solution, when it is clearly in violation of the original requirements? –  AndreyT Mar 23 '11 at 16:44
    
@Alex Reche Martinez: That means that the only correct output for 11 is "no solution possible" or something along those lines. –  AndreyT Mar 23 '11 at 16:57

Here is my solution where the result will be perfectly balanced and with detection of impossible cases:

vector<int> recursive_splitnumber(int n) {

    if (n <= 5) {
        return vector<int>(1,n);
    }

    int unbalancer = 0;
    vector<int> result1, result2;
    do {
        int val1, val2;
        if (n%2 == 0) {
            val1 = n%2 + unbalancer;
            val2 = n%2 - unbalancer;
        }
        else {
            val1 = (n-1)%2 + 1 + unbalancer;
            val2 = (n-1)%2 - unbalancer;
        }

        result1 = recursive_splitnumber(val1);
        result2 = recursive_splitnumber(val2);

        // Concatenate the result of the even and odd splits
        result1.insert(result1.end(),result2.begin(),result2.end());

        ++unbalancer;

    } while (result1.size()%2 != 0 && unbalancer <= 1);
    return result1;
}

bool splitnumber(int n) {
    vector<int> split = recursive_splitnumber(n);
    if (split.size()%2 == 0) {
        copy(split.begin(), split.end(), ostream_iterator<int>(cout, " "));
        return true;
    } else
        return false;
}

That solution will also take into account cases like the number 22 where the balanced division gives 11+11 (11 being a number that cannot be represented using the given rules), the subdivision will be done as 10+12, then 5+5+6+6 and finally 5+5+3+3+3+3.

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