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My goal is to wrap every single dom elements (Node.ELEMENT_NODE) on current org.w3c.dom.Document with tag <something style="background-color:red"></something>.

public static void main(String[] args){
    org.w3c.dom.DOMDocument doc;
    paintAllNodes(doc, 0);
}

public static void paintAllNodes(Node node, int level) {
    // Process node

    // If there are any children, visit each one
    NodeList list = node.getChildNodes();
    for (int i=0; i<list.getLength(); i++) {
        // Get child node
        Node childNode = list.item(i);        

        // Visit child node
        paintAllNodes(childNode, level+1);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Sorry, do you want to add the attribute style to all of the elements or also to change the name of the elements? –  javanna Mar 31 '11 at 13:07
    
I want to wrap <something style="background-color:red'"></something> around all elements. –  KJW Apr 1 '11 at 1:07
1  
Good question, +1. See my answer for the shortest and simplest solution for this problem. Remember to add XSLT to your tool-set as the tool for any XML transformation. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 3 '11 at 19:38
    
Why not award your bounty to your favourite answer? Is there any reason for that? :-) –  javanna Apr 4 '11 at 18:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'd like to propose you a recursive solution, which make use of Node#replaceChild method to replace a node with a new tag:

public static void paintAllNodes(Node node) {
    if (node.getNodeType() == Node.ELEMENT_NODE) {
        Element somethingElement = node.getOwnerDocument().createElement("something");
        somethingElement.setAttribute("style", "background-color:red");
        node.getParentNode().replaceChild(somethingElement, node);
        somethingElement.appendChild(node);
        NodeList nodeList = node.getChildNodes();
        for (int i = 0; i < nodeList.getLength(); i++) {
            paintAllNodes(nodeList.item(i));
        }
    }
}

This is my main:

public static void main(String[] args) throws SAXException, IOException,
        ParserConfigurationException, TransformerException {

    DocumentBuilderFactory docBuilderFactory = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance();
    DocumentBuilder docBuilder = docBuilderFactory.newDocumentBuilder();
    Document document = docBuilder.parse(new File("document.xml"));
    paintAllNodes(document.getDocumentElement());

    TransformerFactory transformerFactory = TransformerFactory.newInstance();
    Transformer transformer = transformerFactory.newTransformer();
    DOMSource source = new DOMSource(document);
    StreamResult result = new StreamResult(System.out);
    transformer.transform(source, result);
}

I've tested it with this xml:

<html>
    <head>
        <title>title</title>
    </head>
    <body>
    <h1>title</h1>
    <div>test</div>
    </body>
</html>

My main has printed out this new xml, which seems to be what you want:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?><something style="background-color:red"><html>
    <something style="background-color:red"><head>
        <something style="background-color:red"><title>title</title></something>
    </head></something>
    <something style="background-color:red"><body>
    <something style="background-color:red"><h1>title</h1></something>
    <something style="background-color:red"><div>test</div></something>
    </body></something>
</html></something>

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I get nullexception at ` Element somethingElement = node.getOwnerDocument().createElement("something");` –  KJW Apr 1 '11 at 8:36
    
Have you used my main method? At the first time you have to pass to paintAllNodes the document.getDocumentElement(): paintAllNodes(document.getDocumentElement());. Have you done that? –  javanna Apr 1 '11 at 8:38
    
yes but it's not working still. –  KJW Apr 1 '11 at 9:07
    
I have made an update to the question. I have used your codes. –  KJW Apr 1 '11 at 9:12
    
I've edited my answer, I've changed a few lines of code to make it more reliable. The getOwnerDocument() method returns null if node is a Document or DocumentType. Now you can also pass the whole Document to the paintAllNodes method. Can you try it please? –  javanna Apr 1 '11 at 14:12

One of the simplest ways to solve such kind of problems (as for any XML transformation) is by using XSLT.

This XSLT transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="*">
 <something style="background-color:red">
   <xsl:copy>
    <xsl:copy-of select="@*"/>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="node()"/>
   </xsl:copy>
  </something>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on any XML document, for example this one:

<nums>
  <num>01</num>
  <num>02</num>
  <num>03</num>
  <num>04</num>
  <num>05</num>
  <num>06</num>
  <num>07</num>
  <num>08</num>
  <num>09</num>
  <num>10</num>
</nums>

produces the wanted, correct result:

<something style="background-color:red">
   <nums>
      <something style="background-color:red">
         <num>01</num>
      </something>
      <something style="background-color:red">
         <num>02</num>
      </something>
      <something style="background-color:red">
         <num>03</num>
      </something>
      <something style="background-color:red">
         <num>04</num>
      </something>
      <something style="background-color:red">
         <num>05</num>
      </something>
      <something style="background-color:red">
         <num>06</num>
      </something>
      <something style="background-color:red">
         <num>07</num>
      </something>
      <something style="background-color:red">
         <num>08</num>
      </something>
      <something style="background-color:red">
         <num>09</num>
      </something>
      <something style="background-color:red">
         <num>10</num>
      </something>
   </nums>
</something>

Note: It is left as an exercise to the reader how to initiate an XSLT transformation in Java code :)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Good answer. –  user357812 Apr 3 '11 at 23:57
3  
@Alejandro: Thanks, it would really be good if an XSLT answer gets the bounty for this question -- some people need to understand which is the best tool to use for transforming XML :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 4 '11 at 0:06

This will wrap every Node.ELEMENT_NODE in a org.w3c.dom.Document with a <something> tag:

public static void paintAllNodes(Document doc) {
    // build list of Node.ELEMENT_NODE to process
    List<Node> nodes = new ArrayList<Node>();
    NodeList list = doc.getElementsByTagName("*");
    for (int i = 0; i < list.getLength(); i++) {
        Node node = list.item(i);
        if (node.getNodeType() == Node.ELEMENT_NODE) {
            nodes.add(node);
        }
    }

    // iterate through each node and wrap with <something> tag
    for (Node node : nodes) {
        // remember the next sibling for inserting at end
        Node nextSibling = node.getNextSibling();

        // remember the parent and remove this node from it
        Node parent = node.getParentNode();
        parent.removeChild(node);

        // create <something> element and attach node
        Element element = doc.createElement("something");
        NamedNodeMap attributes = element.getAttributes();
        Attr attr = doc.createAttribute("style");
        attr.setNodeValue("background-color:red");
        attributes.setNamedItem(attr);
        element.appendChild(node);

        // insert new element where the node was 
        parent.insertBefore(element, nextSibling);
    }
}

If you want to exclude any nodes then just filter them out in the first for loop.

share|improve this answer
    
this just returns a blank document. it wipes out the loaded DOM document. –  KJW Apr 1 '11 at 1:24
    
Can you give an example of a document you're dealing with? I tested with this and the above code works fine: <html><body><h1>Test Header</h1><p>Test body</p></body></html> –  WhiteFang34 Apr 1 '11 at 2:04
    
+1 for the use of doc.getElementsByTagName("*"); to avoid recursion. –  javanna Apr 1 '11 at 7:28
    
I've tested it, it works! I've also added my answer with an alternative solution. –  javanna Apr 1 '11 at 7:33

As a non-answer ;-) I propose to use CSS... something {background:red} Obviously, this only makes sense if you use CSS anyways.

share|improve this answer

For any given node 'node', and the document 'document' it came from something like this should work.

Node parent = node.getParent();
Node nextSibling = node.getNextSibling();

parent.removeChild(node);

Element something = document.createElement("something");
NamedNodeMap atts = something.getAttributes();
Attr att = document.createAttribute("style");
att.setNodeValue("background-color:red;");
atts.setNamedItem(att);
something.addChild(node);
parent.insertBefore(something, nextSibling);
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