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Can you please explain the output of this C program ? I guess that the problem is with the stack getting corrupt duing printf("%d\n",t); function call because i'm pushing a float but reading an int.Im not sure.

Thanks.

#include<stdio.h> 
main() 

{ 
    long x; 
    float t; 
    scanf("%f",&t); 
    printf("%d\n",t); 
    x=30;
    printf("%f\n",x); 
    { 
      x=9;
        printf("%f\n",x); 
        { 
      x=10;
            printf("%f\n",x); 
        } 
        printf("%f\n",x); 
    } 
    x==9;
        printf("%f\n",x); 

}

And the output

$ ./a.out 
20.39
0
20.389999
20.389999
20.389999
20.389999
20.389999
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2  
You need to compile your code with more compiler warnings enabled, and heed the warnings it does give you (before posting the code to SO). –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 23 '11 at 9:32
1  
@Jonathan Leffler: As I read the Q, he knows he's doing it wrong but would like to understand what actually happens. He should've been more explicit though, and included compiler/platform info. –  Erik Mar 23 '11 at 9:46

4 Answers 4

What happens is that you lie to the compiler ... first you tell it you are going to send an int to printf but you send a float instead, and then you tell it you are going to send a double but you send a long instead.

Don't do that. Don't lie to the compiler.

You have invoked Undefined Behaviour. Anything can happen. Your program might corrupt the stack; it might output what you expect; it might make lemon juice come out of the USB port; ..., ..., ...


Ignore this part :)

Apparently, in your computer with your compiler options, the bit representation of the float value 20.39, when interpreted as int is the same representation as the int value 0 (zero) ... and the bit representation of the long values 9, 10, or 30, when interpreted as float is the same representation as the float value 20.389999.

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You are using the wrong format specifier to print long. Use format specifier %ld instead. Results

printf("%f\n",x);
     // ^ change this to %ld 
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i know it is wrong,I asked for explanation for the output.Thanks anyway. –  svpranay Mar 23 '11 at 11:22
    
usage of wrong format specifier can lead to anything as @Prasoon quote stated from the standard. Hence the result. –  Mahesh Mar 23 '11 at 11:24

What actually happens is:

  • Your float is 4 bytes, your long is 4 bytes, your double is 8 bytes.
  • You pass a float through ellipsis - it gets converted to a double. 8 bytes on stack.
  • You pass a long through ellipsis - 4 bytes on stack.
  • printf parses 8 bytes on stack (float specifier) as a double. This double will consist of the "important" part of the old double on stack, and a slight variation in the least significant part (your long).
  • Default %f output truncates the value, you don't see the variation.

Change all your %f to e.g. %.20f to see how the long affects the double.

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On AMD64 the first eight float arguments are passed through SSE registers, so the long won't overwrite even part of it. –  aaz Mar 23 '11 at 9:47
    
@aaz: The behavior matches x86, so I'm doing a bad thing and assuming :) –  Erik Mar 23 '11 at 9:48
    
– It matches AMD64, so I'm assuming too :) The %.20f result will be different though. –  aaz Mar 23 '11 at 9:52
    
@aaz: Are registers used for ellipsis on amd64/gcc? Learn something new every day :P –  Erik Mar 23 '11 at 9:54
    
– Yep. The only difference with ellipsis is that AL contains an upper bound on the number of SSE registers used for arguments. –  aaz Mar 23 '11 at 10:06

printf("%d\n",t);

Using incorrect format specifier in printf invokes undefined behaviour.

Use %f for printing float and double and %ld for printing long

C99 clearly says (wrt printf and fprintf)

If a conversion specification is invalid, the behavior is undefined. If any argument is not the correct type for the corresponding conversion specification, the behavior is undefined.

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