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JavaScript: var functionName = function() {} vs function functionName() {}

are they the same? I've always wondered

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marked as duplicate by Bergi, SztupY, Andrew Whitaker, Ben, evilone Dec 23 '12 at 18:01

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2 Answers 2

up vote 21 down vote accepted

No, they're not the same, although they do both result in a function you can call via the symbol foo. One is a function declaration, the other is a function expression. They are evaluated at different times, have different effects on the scope in which they're defined, and are legal in different places.

Quoting my answer to this other question here (edited a bit for relevance), in case the other question were ever removed for some reason (and to save people following the link):


JavaScript has two different but related things: Function declarations, and function expressions. There are marked differences between them:

This is a function declaration:

function foo() {
    // ...
}

Function declarations are evaluated upon entry into the enclosing scope, before any step-by-step code is executed. The function's name (foo) is added to the enclosing scope (technically, the variable object for the execution context the function is defined in).

This is a function expression (specifically, an anonymous one, like your quoted code):

var foo = function() {
    // ...
};

Function expressions are evaluated as part of the step-by-step code, at the point where they appear (just like any other expression). That one creates a function with no name, which it assigns to the foo variable.

Function expressions can also be named rather than anonymous. A named one looks like this:

var x = function foo() {  // Valid, but don't do it; see details below 
    // ...
};

A named function expression should be valid, according to the spec. It should create a function with the name foo, but not put foo in the enclosing scope, and then assign that function to the x variable (all of this happening when the expression is encountered in the step-by-step code). When I say it shouldn't put foo in the enclosing scope, I mean exactly that:

var x = function foo() {
    alert(typeof foo); // alerts "function" (in compliant implementations)
};
alert(typeof foo);     // alerts "undefined" (in compliant implementations)

Note how that's different from the way function declarations work (where the function's name is added to the enclosing scope).

Named function expressions work on compliant implementations, but there are bugs in several implementations in the wild, most especially Internet Explorer (that is, JScript). It processes a named function expresssion twice: First as a function declaration (upon entry into the execution context), and then later as a function expression, generating two distinct functions in the process. (Really.)

More here: Double take and here: Named function expressions demystified

Because of implementation bugs, I avoid named function expressions. But I like my functions to have names so my tools can help me. Consequently, where some might write:

var Thingy = {
    foo: function() {
        // Do something
    }
};

I'll usually write

var Thingy = (function(){
    var publicSymbols = {};

    publicSymbols.foo = foo;
    function foo() {
        // Do something
    }

    return publicSymbols;
})();

...except that I have utilities to do that plumbing for me, so it's not really that verbose.

Here's how that gets processed:

  1. An anonymous enclosing function is created when the var Thingy = ... line is encountered in the step-by-step code, and then it is called (because I have the () at the very end).
  2. Upon entry into the execution context created by that anonymous function, the foo function declaration is evaluated and the symbol foo is added to the scope inside that anonymous function (technically, to the variable object for the execution context).
  3. The publicSymbols symbol is added to the scope inside the anonymous function. (More: Poor misunderstood var)
  4. Step-by-step code begins by assigning {} to publicSymbols.
  5. Step-by-step code continues with publicSymbols.foo = foo;. Then it executes the return publicSymbols;
  6. The anonymous function's result is assigned to Thingy.

Technically, you should be able to write that like this:

var Thingy = (function(){
    return {
        foo: foo
    };

    function foo() {
        // Do something
    }
})();

...but I never do, because there are too many tools (and JavaScript implementations) that don't understand when the declarations really happen. :-) And also, it's easier for me to do maintenance on large structures if I do the declaration and the assignment to the property next to each other.


And finally, another difference between them is where they're legal. A function expression can appear anywhere an expression can appear (which is virtually anywhere). A function declaration can only appear at the top level of its enclosing scope, outside of any control-flow statements. So for instance, this is valid:

function bar(x) {
    var foo;

    if (x) {
        foo = function() {  // Function expression...
            // Do X
        };
    }
    else {
        foo = function() {  // ...and therefore legal
            // Do Y
        };
    }
    foo();
}

...but this is not, and does not do what it looks like it does on most implementations:

function bar(x) {

    if (x) {
        function foo() {  // Function declaration -- INVALID
            // Do X
        }
    }
    else {
        function foo() {  // INVALID
            // Do Y
        }
    }
    foo();
}

And it makes perfect sense: Since the foo function declarations are evaluated upon entry into the bar function, before any step-by-step code is executed, the interpreter has no idea which foo to evaluate. This isn't a problem for expressions since they're done during the control-flow.

Since the syntax is invalid, implementations are free to do what they want. I've never met one that did what I would have expected, which is to throw a syntax error and fail. Instead, nearly all of them just ignore the control flow statements and do what they should do if there are two foo function declarations at the top level (which is use the second one; that's in the spec). So only the second foo is used. Firefox's SpiderMonkey is the standout, it seems to (effectively) convert them into expressions, and so which it uses depends on the value of x. Live example.

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4  
That.. was a fantasticly clear explanation. –  RHSeeger Mar 23 '11 at 19:16

I got an excellent explanation on this while asking very similar question: Two functions with the same name in JavaScript - how can this work?

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1  
I read the answer you linked to. Now I have to delete my own answer here. You learn something nwe every day.. –  nfechner Mar 23 '11 at 9:34
1  
Oh, hey, didn't see that you'd linked my earlier answer. Cheers! –  T.J. Crowder Mar 23 '11 at 9:43

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