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I have a table of labels that are displayed in a ranked order. To ensure that no two rows can have the same rank, their values are unique:

create table label (
  id_label serial not null,
  rank integer not null,
  title text not null,
  constraint pri primary key (id_label),
  constraint unq unique (rank)
)

Doesn't matter if it's PostgreSQL or MySQL, they exhibit the same behaviour. A query might look like select title from label order by rank. Assume the table contains:

id_label rank title
1        10   Cow
2        20   Apple
3        45   Horse
4        60   Beer

Now suppose I want to reorder two labels, e.g. have Apple ranked before Cow. The easiest way is to swap their rank values:

update label
set rank = case when rank = 20 then 10 else 20 end
where id_label in (1,2)

Nope. Nor:

update label
set rank = case when rank = 20 then rank - 10 else rank + 10 end
where id_label in (1,2)

Nor even:

update label
set rank = 30 - rank
where id_label in (1,2)

Each time, the unique constraint fires on the first row update and aborts the operation. If I could defer the check until the end of the statement I would be fine. This happens on both PostgreSQL and MySQL.

An ACID-safe workaround is to:

  1. begin transaction
  2. select ranks of first, second record, and highest (max) rank in table (which offhand will probably require a union)
  3. update first record to rank = max + 1
  4. update second record to rank of first
  5. update first record to rank of second
  6. commit

That's just unspeakably ugly. Worse is to drop the constraint, update, and then recreate the constraint. Granting such privileges to an operational role is asking for trouble. So my question is this: is there a simple technique I have overlooked that solves this problem, or am I SOL?

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2  
This is my experience too. Unlike most other DBMSs, PostgreSQL does not respect the A part of ACID, which is unfortunate. Whether this has been fixed in later verions I don't know. According to a_horse_with_no_name it apparently hasn't. –  sqlvogel Mar 23 '11 at 10:08
1  
@dportas: the only place where the A is not respected are unique (and thus primary keys). All other constraints are properly evaluated on statement level. And this has been fixed with 9.0. MySQL never respects this properly as it always evaluates all constraints on row level, never on statement level. –  a_horse_with_no_name Mar 23 '11 at 10:23
2  
I don't think that requiring the user to defer the constraint as workaround really counts as "fixing" the original problem. A deferred constraint defers validation for multiple statements. It's a messy workaround because it means you have to defer the constraint for ALL statements in the transaction, even when you didn't want to defer it for ANY of them. A real fix would be for PG to validate the constraint properly at statement boundaries rather than at row level. I believe you are right however, MySQL suffers the same problem. –  sqlvogel Mar 23 '11 at 10:45
    
@dportas: you can define the constraint as initially deferred. Then it doesn't require a "manual" change. –  a_horse_with_no_name Mar 23 '11 at 10:50
1  
That's just syntactic sugar. The unwanted effect is still the same. –  sqlvogel Mar 23 '11 at 10:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

With PostgreSQL this can only be solved in a "nice" way using Version 9.0 because you can define unique constraints to be deferrable there.

With PostgreSQL 9.0 you'd simply do:

create table label (
  id_label serial not null,
  rank integer not null,
  title text not null,
  constraint pri primary key (id_label)
);
alter table label add constraint unique_rank unique (rank) 
      deferrable initially immediate;

Then the update is as simple as this:

begin;
set constraints unique_rank DEFERRED;
update rank
   set rank = case when rank = 20 then 10 else 20 end
   where id_label in (1,2);
commit;

Edit:
If you don't want to bother setting the constraint to deferred inside your transaction, you can simply define the constraint as initially deferred.

share|improve this answer

I had a similar problem and my solution was the following:

  1. START TRANSACTION
  2. SELECT * FROM label WHERE id_label IN(1,2)
  3. Delete FROM label WHERE id_label IN(1,2)
  4. INSERT INTO label(all, columns, of, table) VALUES(all, values, we, selected)
  5. COMMIT TRANSACTION

If any errors, rollback transaction.

You can do this without dropping the unique constraint.

share|improve this answer

Of course you can just:

update label set rank = 5 where id_label=2

but the problem here I guess is you need to be able to handle the case when there is no 'gap' between consecutive ranks. For postgres, using numeric instead of integer gets round the problem because it has almost unlimited precision

create table label (
  id_label serial not null,
  rank numeric not null,
  title text not null,
  constraint pri primary key (id_label),
  constraint unq unique (rank)
)

now you need to update just one row to move it anywhere in the ranking, no matter what the ranks of any other row, by splitting the difference between the rank above and the one below.

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1  
Gaps are not the problem. The problem is that updating the rows creates an intermediate state where the unique constraint is violated. If the constraint is evaluated on statement level rather than row level, this does not create a conflict because once the update has finished the unique constraint is no longer violated. –  a_horse_with_no_name Mar 23 '11 at 13:15
    
@a_horse yup - I read with interest your comments and those from @dportas. I'm just suggesting a different approach in case it suits @dland better. Sometimes it is better to update one row rather than 2, especially if your GUI front-end is caching data ;-) –  Jack Douglas Mar 23 '11 at 13:22
    
@JackPDouglas, that strikes me as being Too Clever. You're going to be making a few trips to the database just to ensure there's an unused value available (e.g. consider Cow and Beer), and if everything is contiguous you're out of luck. Switching to numeric seems like piling on more technology to shore up a faulty premise. Using max+1 looks like less work to me. –  dland Mar 24 '11 at 10:09
1  
@dland - I took 'reorder two labels' to be an example of what you wanted - assuming the simplest case to be when you just wanted to move 1 row somewhere else in the ranking. If all you ever want is to swap pairs of rows then I agree, but others might find my approach useful. Note that using max+1 will cause serialiazation of your updates - not a good thing if you are trying to do lots of them in parallel (ie lots of users) or if this update is part of a longer transaction. –  Jack Douglas Mar 24 '11 at 11:04
1  
@dland why not just select -pg_backend_pid()? I guess you aren't allowing negative numbers for your ranks, so out of curiosity what would you do if you wanted to insert 10 new records before 'Cow' (rank=10)? An idea similar to what you suggest, you could only regard even numbers as allowed ranks then use the odd numbers (eg rank+1) as 'transitional' values. Only other updates affecting the same rows would then serialize. –  Jack Douglas Mar 25 '11 at 14:32

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