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Warning:Total Rails Newb (TRN). This should be a pretty basic question so I'm hoping someone can spare a couple mins to help shed some light.

Let's say I have the following models: User, Group, and Member A user can have many groups (let's say friends, family, etc) A group can have many members, namely other users.

How would I structure this?

Initially I tried this:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :groups
  has_many :groups, :through => :members
end

class Groups < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :users, :through => :members
  belongs_to :user
end

class Member < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :group
  belongs_to :user
end

However this gave me an error in User so I changed

has_many :groups, :through => :members

to

has_many :memberships, :through => :members, :source => :groups

Still getting an error about missing association when I try to do

group = Group.new
group.user.new
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It will be useful: http://railscasts.com/episodes/47-two-many-to-many

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :members
  has_many :groups, :through => :members
  has_many :groups_as_owner, :class_name => "Group"
end

class Groups < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :members
  has_many :users, :through => :members
  belongs_to :owner, :class_name => "User", :foreign_key => :user_id
end

class Member < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :group
  belongs_to :user
end
share|improve this answer
    
Why when you call user.groups does this display the group multiple times in the returned array? For instance, if you had 2 members in a group and called user.groups then that group would show up twice in the array because it is associated with 2 members –  iWasRobbed Mar 24 '11 at 2:23
1  
Because it is natural behaviour. It will return not uniq groups, but all associated groupes as much as members have. You can always call user.groups.uniq or by DISTINCT sql to return uniq groups for user. But actually the problem you are talking about is connected with validation actually. You should validate uniqueness of data you create. –  fl00r Mar 24 '11 at 9:18
    
Well, it's not creating multiple "group #2" in the database, so all group ID's are unique in the db and it shouldn't be a validation thing. It was just returning the unique group multiple times since it was connected with members. So you're probably right about just using user.groups.uniq to return a unique set. Thanks for explaining –  iWasRobbed Mar 24 '11 at 13:04
    
It is creating multiple members with same references, so it is about validation of member –  fl00r Mar 24 '11 at 13:09
    
Great answers! Here's the issue. There's still 1 missing link which is that a user is part of groups, but a user ALSO is the owner of groups. So each group needs to have a user_id field which indicates which user owns it. While the guides on has_many_through relationships are clear, they don't tell you how to handle multiple relation ships between two models. –  RubyRunt Mar 28 '11 at 11:35

basically has_many-through associations are n:m associations (join-tables) that (shall) have more attributes than just the id's of the joined record ids...

so you have a table Groups (with an id), a table Users (with an id) and a table Members (no id, but user_id and group_id)

basically, what you did is nearly correct, just think about how you access a group from a user or vice versa....

a user would first look up its member information and through that member information get access to the group information ... and vice versa for a group

so you first set up

has_many :members

and then call

has_many :groups, :through => :members

all you need is

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :members
  has_many :groups, :through => :members
end

class Groups < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :members
  has_many :users, :through => :members
end

class Member < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :group
  belongs_to :user
end

and you have another bug in your code above

you might want to use

user = group.users.new

instead of

user = group.user.new
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1  
and again i was a few seconds too slow :-) –  Ingo Mar 23 '11 at 10:52

Try this structure:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :members
  has_many :groups, :through => :members
end

class Groups < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :members
  has_many :users, :through => :members
end

class Member < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :group
  belongs_to :user
end

Also take a look at has_and_belongs_to_many, if you don't need to do with class Member then you should use has_and_belongs_to_many. In this case don't forget to create joining table in the database

share|improve this answer
    
has_and_belongs_to_many is often now replaced by has_many :through because people find (as I've known from real experiences) that very frequently what start out as a simple link table with the two ID's, soon gets changed to reflect additional attributes that become needed, even if just date fields. –  Michael Durrant Jul 9 '11 at 12:16

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