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Would you consider using an interface and polymorphism to extend this design to be over-engineering?

Pros

  • Extensible
  • Encapsulated
  • Auto-magical

Cons

  • Lots more code
  • A little bulky to use (you have to use a different type name to get the different behaviour)
  • May be less efficient to use due to virtual function calls.

My instinct is that, for this particular case, a single if statement and a boolean flag is the superior option, but not everybody has agreed with me.

What do you think?


Original

// Connects to a local pipe, and naturally
// owns that connection
struct CommandWriter
{
   CommandWriter() {
       fd = open("/path/to/fifo", O_WRONLY);
       if (fd == -1)
           throw std::runtime_error("Could not establish connection to FIFO");
   };

   ~CommandWriter() {
       close(fd);
   };

   // (Has useful member functions here)

   private:
      CommandWriter(CommandWriter const&); // Not relevant to question

      int fd;
};

Extended with a boolean flag

// Adds a constructor where an FD can be specified
// from the call site, and no ownership is taken
struct CommandWriter
{
   CommandWriter() : owns_fd(true) {
       fd = open("/path/to/fifo", O_WRONLY);
       if (fd == -1)
           throw std::runtime_error("Could not establish connection to FIFO");
   };

   CommandWriter(int fd) : fd(fd), owns_fd(false) {};

   ~CommandWriter() {
       if (owns_fd)
          close(fd);
   };

   // (Has useful member functions here)

   private:
      CommandWriter(CommandWriter const&); // Not relevant to question

      int  fd;
      bool owns_fd;
};

Extended with polymorphism

// Sorry for the poor type names!
struct ICommandWriter
{
   virtual ICommandWriter() {}

   // (Has useful member functions here)

   private:
      ICommandWriter(ICommandWriter const&); // Not relevant to question
};

struct CommandWriter_Connects : ICommandWriter
{
   CommandWriter_Connects() {
       fd = open("/path/to/fifo", O_WRONLY);
       if (fd == -1)
           throw std::runtime_error("Could not establish connection to FIFO");
   };

   ~CommandWriter_Connects() {
       close(fd);
   };

   // (Has useful member functions here)

   private:
      int fd;
};

struct CommandWriter_Uses : ICommandWriter
{
   CommandWriter_Uses(int fd) : fd(fd) {};

   ~CommandWriter_Uses() {};

   // (Has useful member functions here)

   private:
      int fd;
};
share|improve this question
    
"Over-engineering" is a subjective notion, or, at least, depends from the context ; what do you intend to do with this code ? (And why all those structs, does "class" seem so ugly to you ?) –  Raveline Mar 23 '11 at 10:43
2  
@Raveline: It doesn't matter whether I choose struct or class. I decided on struct for the code in the question to save wasting space with pointless public: specifiers. Why are you averse to struct? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 23 '11 at 10:53

6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It depends on what you will use it for. If you have a big project and will use variants of the class many times then certainly it makes sense to make it flexible.

A rule of thumb:

  1. Use it once - just keep it simple.
  2. Use it twice - Keep it simple and make a copy and change as needed
  3. Three or more - Generalise it and make it work for all cases.

Of course there are many exceptions, but that is a starting point.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this rule of thumb. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 23 '11 at 11:05
8  
a.k.a. "one, two, lots". Programmers shouldn't need to be able to count ;-) –  Steve Jessop Mar 23 '11 at 11:08
    
@Steve: Hehe... –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 23 '11 at 11:12
    
@Steve: Especially because anything happening more than two times will happen in a loop anyway...;) –  Mephane Mar 23 '11 at 13:32

Why don't you just duplicate file descriptor? That way, when object is destroyed, you can just close() it and let the operating system take care of the rest:

CommandWriter::CommandWriter (int _fd) : fd (dup (_fd)) {};

Adding a boolean flag for this is inventing a wheel. And using polymorphism is building a frigging helicopter.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for rendering the entire question pointless (at least for the real-world case that this hypothetical question was borne out of). :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 23 '11 at 11:08
    
Re your edit (final paragraph), I couldn't agree more. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 23 '11 at 12:24
    
Glad I could help :) –  Septagram Mar 24 '11 at 6:11
1  
+1: Key insight here: if you find yourself busy with such Should I use a conditional or polymorphy to express alternative decisions, take a step back and ask your self Do I need an alternative at all?. –  Frerich Raabe Jul 21 '11 at 12:56

I would agree with you, that the boolean solution is appropriate here, if you do not expect to add further features in the future.

An alternative solution would be to use the Strategy Pattern. This is similar to the custom deleters for Boost's smart-pointers.

share|improve this answer
    
expectations are generally vague. I'd say: keep the boolean for now, refactor if necessary in the future if it becomes messy when you add features. –  Matthieu M. Mar 23 '11 at 10:48

I'd consider that over-engineering. The second code snippet is much more concise and it's use is straightforward. Using flags to denote ownership over objects is not totally idiomatic, but it can be seen quite often so I think most people will understand the intent quickly.

Keep it Simple and Stupid.

(I would prefer the polymorphic solution if it is certain that further code paths need to be added in future).

share|improve this answer
3  
I thought it was "Keep It Simple, Stupid" (he says, linking to an article that lists your phrase as an accepted variation). –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 23 '11 at 11:08

I would prefer the Interface. The reason is, that it is clear to the user of the interface, that there can be various implementations. Maybe in a month you need to implement a CommandWriter that writes to a db instead of a file (sure you could even subclass the boolean version, but it's not that obvious to the user as an interface).

Also for unit testing i would say the Interface is the cleaner approach because you can implement a stub for the classes you want to test and which use ICommandWriter.

But as mentioned above, if you intend to use it only once, just take the version with the boolean flag.

share|improve this answer

In the polymorphism code:

// (Has useful member functions here)

Does it, though? If there are a lot of member functions in all three places (base class and two derived classes), then an owning and a non-owning writer are really quite different beasts. It probably is best then to separate them into different classes, rather than having a class that behaves very differently according to a boolean flag set in it according to which constructor was called.

I suspect though that all the useful member functions are in the base class, and all the derived classes do is change construction and destruction. In that case, I would want a smart_fd class that holds an fd and knows how to dispose of it (you need two cases - call close or do nothing. shared_ptr allows an arbitrary destructing function, but you probably don't need that here).

Then have one of those in your CommandWriter, and initialize that differently according to which constructor of CommandWriter is called.

Rule of thumb: classes that manage resources should do nothing else.

share|improve this answer
    
"I suspect though that all the useful member functions are in the base class, [...]" indeed. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 23 '11 at 11:24
    
smart_fd it is, then. Take as much as you need of the interface of some smart pointer or other, and no more. Probably scoped_ptr is the model. For example if CommandWriter is non-copyable, our smart_fd doesn't need to be, at least for now. –  Steve Jessop Mar 23 '11 at 11:26

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