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Any place where you need a run-time value to construct a particular dependency, Abstract Factory is the solution.

My qestion is: Why do many sources favor FactoryInterface over FactoryDelegate to implement this pattern? What are the pros and contras for both solutions?

Here is an example to understand what i mean

If you have a Service that needs a Repository with a certain Context then the Service constructor needs a factory to create or access its repository.

The common solution for this is to create a RepositoryFactoryInterface like this.

public IRepositoryFactory {
    IRepository Create(ContextInformation context);
}

public class MyService {
    private IRepositoryFactory repositoryFactory;
    public MyService(IRepositoryFactory repositoryFactory)
    {
        this.repositoryFactory = repositoryFactory:
    }

    public void DoSomeService()
    {
        ContextInformation context = ....;

        IRepository repository = this.repositoryFactory.Create(context);

        repository.Load(...);
        ...
        repository.Save(...);
    }
}

You also need to implement IRepositoryFactory interface some way

public MyEf4RepositoryFactory : IRepositoryFactory
{
    IRepository Create(ContextInformation context)
    {
        return new MyEf4Repository(context);
    }
}

... and use it in the application

public void main()
{
    IRepositoryFactory repoFactory = new MyEf4RepositoryFactory();
    IService service = new MyService(repoFactory); 

    service.DoSomeService();
}

----- End of mainstream solution ------

Instead of the RepositoryFactoryInterface you can do the same with a factorydelegate that requires less coding like this.

public class MyService {
    private Func<ContextInformation, IRepository> repositoryFactory;
    public MyService(Func<ContextInformation, IRepository> repositoryFactory)
    {
        this.repositoryFactory = repositoryFactory:
    }

    public void DoSomeService()
    {
        ContextInformation context = ....;

        IRepository repository = this.repositoryFactory(context);

        repository.Load(...);
        ...
        repository.Save(...);
    }
}

... and use it in the application

public void main()
{
    IService service = new MyService(context => new MyEf4Repository(context)); 

    service.DoSomeService();
}

In my opinion the factorydelegate context => new MyEf4Repository(context) is much more compact than declaring and implementing an interface IRepositoryFactory and MyEf4RepositoryFactory.

There must be a reason for this and i want to know why.

Here is one example source that uses the interface aproach: answer to is-there-a-pattern-for-initializing-objects-created-via-a-di-container

[Update]15 Months after asking this question and having more experience with the java universers i changed my mind: Now I prefer interfaces over delegates . But i cannot say why. It is just a feeling. Maybe because I am more used to it?

share|improve this question
    
A bit long, but a nice question. –  Steven Mar 23 '11 at 11:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Personally, I have always used the mainstream solution, simply because I didn't think of using a delegate.

After I thought of it, I faced the problem of separation of concerns. I'm using Ninject, and I didn't want my binding module to look like this (imagine the repositoy having some dependencies of itself):

class IoCModule : NinjectModule
{
    public override Load()
    {
        Bind<Func<Context, IRepository>>()
            .ToConstant( context => new MyEf4Repository(context, Kernel.Get<IRepositoryDependency1>, Kernel.Get<IRepositoryDependency2>) );
    }
}

That isn't readable at all. So I still used fully typed out abstract factories for Separation of Concern and readability.

Now I use the FuncModule described in this question (a la AutoFac). So I can do this:

class IoCModule : NinjectModule
{
    public override Load()
    {
        Bind<IRepository>().To<MyEf4Repository>();
        Bind<IRepositoryDependency1>().To<...>();
        Bind<IRepositoryDependency2>().To<...>();
    }
}

and let ninject figure the dependencies out for me. As you can see, it's both more readable than using the method described above, and having to bind the factories for each dependency. This is the way I made the transition from the mainstream solution to the delegate solution.

So to answer your question. The reason I used the mainstream solution was because I didn't know how to do it another way at first (this is partly caused by most blogs fully typing out the abstract factories, can you see the circle?).

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for delegates not beeing so easy/sutable for IoC-Container-Frameworks –  k3b Mar 23 '11 at 16:36

I find the use of factory interfaces much more intend revealing than the use of delegates. It is a bit more verbose, but much clearer what the meaning is of such a thing.

Take for instance the example of injecting a Func<DateTime> into a service. What does this actually mean and what value does it return? Is it intuitive that it returns an DateTime.Now, or does it in fact return something else? In that case it would be much clearer to define an ITimeProvider interface with a GetCurrentTime() method.

Others tend to use delegates, because it's less verbose. There is however a middle ground. You can define a generic interface for defining factories like this:

public interface IFactory<T>
{
    T CreateNew();
}

This interface makes it clear that a new instance will be created. This will prevent you from doing IFactory<DateTime>.CreateNew(), because what does that actually mean?

And you can define a implementation that takes a delegate:

private class DelegateFactory<T> : IFactory<T>
{
    private readonly Func<T> instanceCreator;

    DelegateFactory(Func<T> instanceCreator)
    {
        this.instanceCreator = instanceCreator;
    }

    public T CreateNew()
    {
        return this.instanceCreator();
    }
}

Instead of injecting the obscure Func<IRepository> you can now inject a IFactory<IRepository> into your MyService.

public class MyService 
{
    public MyService(IFactory<IRepository> repositoryFactory)
    {
        var repository = repositoryFactory.CreateNew();
    }
}

Configuring your factory in your container is now easy as this:

var factory = new DelegateFactory<IRepository>(() =>
{
    return container.GetInstance<MyRepository>();
});

container.RegisterSingle<IFactory<IRepository>>(factory);

You could even make a extension method for your IoC container, that allows you to make the registrations more easily. Your registration could than look something like this:

container.RegisterFactory<IRepository>(
    () => container.GetInstance<MyRepository>());

Of course the extension method would be trivial. Here is an example using the Simple Service Locator, but the idea is the same for all containers:

public static void RegisterFactory<T>(
    this Container container,
    Func<T> instanceCreator)
{
    var factory = new DelegateFactory<T>(instanceCreator);
    container.RegisterSingle<IFactory<T>>(factory);
}

This way you can still inject pretty intend revealing dependencies, without the overhead of having to define an interface for each factory.

Note that this only works well for factories that contain one parameterless create method. Also note that I would still prefer the ITimeProvider instead of a IFactory<DateTime> because that still doesn't say a thing.

share|improve this answer
    
Func<DateTime> is indeed cryptic. But I find Func<IUserRepository> to be rather unambiguous. Maybe for the first case you should still create full factories, but for the other cases just use Func<...>? –  dvdvorle Mar 23 '11 at 12:05
    
@Mr Happy: I just rather be a bit more verbose, but I think we will not agree about this :-) –  Steven Mar 23 '11 at 13:46
1  
Another point of happy middle ground - you can define custom delegate types (primarily for the benefit of a descriptive name) in many circumstances. –  Nicholas Blumhardt Mar 25 '11 at 10:17
    
@Nicholas: Custom delegates. That's a nice one. I didn't think of that. It has still one downside though, and that is that repositoryFactory() is still less clear than repositoryFactory.CreateNew(). –  Steven Mar 29 '11 at 9:53

I believe calling "factory" a delegate shouldn't be correct.

Factory has the responsability of instantiating some supported type, like some repository implementation.

Doing with delegates doesn't make sense because you're defining how your repository is instantiated whenever you want to create an instance of your service.

The question for me is why you should use a delegate if you can implement a generic parameter TRepository having "new" and "class" constraints, and, in construction time, instantiate the repository inside your service?

It's just an opinion, but it seems you want a shortcut instead of a better, well designed and optimal solution.

Summarizing:

  • Factory over a delegate allows inversion of control even for the factory itself.

  • Delegate over factory has zero advantage since you can even eliminate the need of a delegate itself - maybe, then, it's useless or redundant -.

  • Delegate "factory" won't be a factory because N ways of creating an instance of respository will be implemented, breaking the need and advantage of factory.

  • There's no need of manually create instances of some repository in the consumer's code. Just use a generic parameter so repository type can be provided in order to create an appropiate instance, thanks to inversion of control.

share|improve this answer

The whole point of using abstract factory over a simple factory is to group together individual factories.

In your case if you ever needed your delegate to produce anything other than an IRepository you would be in trouble..

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for group together individual factories. –  Johann Gerell Mar 23 '11 at 11:40
    
If you don't have a need to group together individual factories, but just want to supply runtime parameters to your dependencies, then group together individual factories is just not what you want, and thus not the whole point of using abstract factory. Maybe in this context we're using the term "Abstract Factory" wrong? –  dvdvorle Mar 23 '11 at 11:50
    
@MrHappy he said the point of using abstract factory over a simple factory. This is important as a simple factory doesn't necessarily have a relationship to other factories, whereas an abstract factory does, as it is a base for a classification of factories. –  rossipedia Aug 13 '12 at 22:20

I like and use the delegate solution as it is more concise. To avoid the readability problem with IoC containers that Mr. Happy mentioned, don't use Func. Instead create your own named delegate.

delegate IRepository RepositoryFactory(ContextInformation context);

Now you have the best of both worlds: the conciseness of delegates and the readability for IoC containers.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a simple compromise to get inted revealing back by becoming more verbose. what about naming the delegate RepositoryDelegate instead of IRepository. Otherwhise i would think it is an interface parameter. –  k3b Aug 14 '12 at 3:31
    
IRespository is the return value of the function, and it is an interface as you guessed. The delegate is named RespositoryFactory, as it is also a factory and more meaningful than RepositoryDelegate. –  enl8enmentnow Jun 26 '13 at 16:59

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