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can you use streamreader to read a normal textfile and then in the middle of reading close the streamreader after saving the current position and then open streamreader again and start reading from that poision ?

if not what else can i use to accomplish the same case without locking the file ?

something like this:

 var fs = File.Open(@"C:\testfile.txt", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read);
        var sr = new StreamReader(fs);
        Debug.WriteLine(sr.ReadLine());//Prints:firstline
        var pos = fs.Position;
        while (!sr.EndOfStream)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(sr.ReadLine());
        }
        fs.Seek(pos, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        Debug.WriteLine(sr.ReadLine());//Prints Nothing, i expect it to print SecondLine.

@lasseespeholt

here is the code i tried

            var position = -1;
        StreamReaderSE sr = new StreamReaderSE(@"c:\testfile.txt");
        Debug.WriteLine(sr.ReadLine());
        position = sr.BytesRead;
        Debug.WriteLine(sr.ReadLine());
        Debug.WriteLine(sr.ReadLine());
        Debug.WriteLine(sr.ReadLine());
        Debug.WriteLine(sr.ReadLine());
        Debug.WriteLine("Wait");
        sr.BaseStream.Seek(position, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        Debug.WriteLine(sr.ReadLine());
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Yes you can, see this:

var sr = new StreamReader("test.txt");
sr.BaseStream.Seek(2, SeekOrigin.Begin); // Check sr.BaseStream.CanSeek first

Update: Be aware that you can't necessarily use sr.BaseStream.Position to anything useful because StreamReader uses buffers so it will not reflect what you actually have read. I guess you gonna have problems finding the true position. Because you can't just count characters (different encodings and therefore character lengths). I think the best way is to work with FileStream´s themselves.

Update: Use the TGREER.myStreamReader from here: http://www.daniweb.com/software-development/csharp/threads/35078 this class adds BytesRead etc. (works with ReadLine() but apparently not with other reads methods) and then you can do like this:

File.WriteAllText("test.txt", "1234\n56789");

long position = -1;

using (var sr = new myStreamReader("test.txt"))
{
    Console.WriteLine(sr.ReadLine());

    position = sr.BytesRead;
}

Console.WriteLine("Wait");

using (var sr = new myStreamReader("test.txt"))
{
    sr.BaseStream.Seek(position, SeekOrigin.Begin);
    Console.WriteLine(sr.ReadToEnd());
}
share|improve this answer
    
seems ok but does it lock the file ? –  Stacker Mar 23 '11 at 11:13
    
You can choose :) see the accepted answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/1606349/… –  Lasse Espeholt Mar 23 '11 at 11:16
    
that wouldnt help me save the position , please check the update in my question. –  Stacker Mar 23 '11 at 11:38
    
it doesnt work with me ! –  Stacker Mar 23 '11 at 12:42
    
@Stacker May I see your code? It works perfectly here and outputs "1234 wait 56789" –  Lasse Espeholt Mar 23 '11 at 12:45

I realize this is really belated, but I just stumbled onto this incredible flaw in StreamReader myself; the fact that you can't reliably seek when using StreamReader. Personally, my specific need is to have the ability to read characters, but then "back up" if a certain condition is met; it's a side effect of one of the file formats I'm parsing.

Using ReadLine() isn't an option because it's only useful in really trivial parsing jobs. I have to support configurable record/line delimiter sequences and support escape delimiter sequences. Also, I don't want to implement my own buffer so I can support "backing up" and escape sequences; that should be the StreamReader's job.

Originally, the direction I was going was to maintain my own position variable by using CurrentEncoding.GetByteCount() on the result of anything I got from Read(). But I like direction of solution #2 here better: http://stackoverflow.com/a/10190359/530545 Here's the method I use based on the code there.

    public long GetActualPosition(StreamReader reader)
    {
        // The current buffer of decoded characters
        char[] charBuffer = (char[]) reader.GetType().InvokeMember("charBuffer"
            , System.Reflection.BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.NonPublic | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Instance | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.GetField
            , null, reader, null); 

        // The current position in the buffer of decoded characters
        int charPos = (int) reader.GetType().InvokeMember("charPos"
            , System.Reflection.BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.NonPublic | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Instance | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.GetField
            , null, reader, null);

        // The number of bytes that the already-read characters need when encoded.
        int numReadBytes = reader.CurrentEncoding.GetByteCount(charBuffer, 0, charPos);

        // The number of encoded bytes that are in the current buffer
        int byteLen = (int) reader.GetType().InvokeMember("byteLen"
            , System.Reflection.BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.NonPublic | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Instance | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.GetField
            , null, reader, null); 

        return reader.BaseStream.Position - byteLen + numReadBytes;
    }

It's a lot faster because you only have to calculate the byte position if/when you need it, not at every read. Of course, you're exposed to everything that comes along for the ride when you use Reflection like this, but I think it's worth it.

When I need to seek to an arbitrary position in the underlying stream, I directly set BaseStream.Position and then call DiscardBufferedData() to get StreamReader back in sync for the next Read()/Peek() call.

And a friendly reminder: don't arbitrarily set BaseStream.Position. E.g. Consider what it would do if you called Read() when the StreamReader was pointed at the 3rd byte of a UTF-32 sequence.

UPDATE: I fixed the method, which originally used the broken code from that other answer. This version has been tested against data containing a characters requiring use of surrogate pairs. The data was put into 3 files, each with a different encoding; one UTF-8, one UTF-16LE, and one UTF-16BE.

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I love you for this. I have been running into all kinds of weird issues trying to reverse the position of a stream reader all day and this fixed it in one! –  Dean North Jun 26 at 14:50

From MSDN:

StreamReader is designed for character input in a particular encoding, whereas the Stream class is designed for byte input and output. Use StreamReader for reading lines of information from a standard text file.

In most of the examples involving StreamReader, you will see reading line by line using the ReadLine(). The Seek method comes from Stream class which is basically used to read or handle data in bytes.

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