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I am new in programming ,specially in web base programming. i want to learn best practices about state management techniques. I mean

when we have to create sessions?,

when to use sessions how to check null sessions? ,

when to use cookies ?

when to use hidden fields ?.

what are differences between all ?

which technique to use at certain time ?

how application may get crashes due to unsuccessful state management?. which things we need to keep in mind about state management when we are developing the web applications...???

there so many questions . perhaps you guys known . please help me out to sort my confusion .

Thanks in advance !

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Please separate your question into different ones. Depending on different scenarios, answers coul differ, so it is hard to give a logical explanation here. –  Caspar Kleijne Mar 23 '11 at 11:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

follow the links :-

Client - server difference in state management:

http://www.techbaba.com/q/858-difference+clint+side+management+server+side+management.aspx

http://www.dotnetfunda.com/articles/article61.aspx

Caching best practices :

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa478965.aspx

state management Best practices :

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/z1hkazw7.aspx

Use state management techniques in c# :

http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/UploadFile/freelance91/ASPNETstatemanagementtechniques01012007212655PM/ASPNETstatemanagementtechniques.aspx

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Thanks , these links must be helpful for me... –  Liladhar Mar 24 '11 at 6:42

Sounds like you should just need to do some reading.

Pro ASP.NET - This book has a chapter about state management, but I am betting the rest of the book would be helpful to you as well since you are a beginner.

Also, MSDN has some good information about state management and when to use what.

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http://www.thedevheaven.com/2012/05/state-management.html

State management is the process by which you maintain state and page information over multiple requests for the same or different pages.

Types of State Management

There are 2 types State Management:

  1. Client – Side State Management This stores information on the client's computer by embedding the information into a Web page, a uniform resource locator(url), or a cookie. The techniques available to store the state information at the client end are listed down below:

a. View State – Asp.Net uses View State to track the values in the Controls. You can add custom values to the view state. It is used by the Asp.net page framework to automatically save the values of the page and of each control just prior to rendering to the page. When the page is posted, one of the first tasks performed by page processing is to restore view state.

b. Control State – If you create a custom control that requires view state to work properly, you should use control state to ensure other developers don’t break your control by disabling view state.

c. Hidden fields – Like view state, hidden fields store data in an HTML form without displaying it in the user's browser. The data is available only when the form is processed.

d. Cookies – Cookies store a value in the user's browser that the browser sends with every page request to the same server. Cookies are the best way to store state data that must be available for multiple Web pages on a web site.

e. Query Strings - Query strings store values in the URL that are visible to the user. Use query strings when you want a user to be able to e-mail or instant message state data with a URL.

  1. Server – Side State Management

a. Application State - Application State information is available to all pages, regardless of which user requests a page.

b. Session State – Session State information is available to all pages opened by a user during a single visit.

Both application state and session state information is lost when the application restarts. To persist user data between application restarts, you can store it using profile properties.

Advantages

Advantages of Client – Side State Management:

  1. Better Scalability: With server-side state management, each client that connects to the Web server consumes memory on the Web server. If a Web site has hundreds or thousands of simultaneous users, the memory consumed by storing state management information can become a limiting factor. Pushing this burden to the clients removes that potential bottleneck.

  2. Supports multiple Web servers: With client-side state management, you can distribute incoming requests across multiple Web servers with no changes to your application because the client provides all the information the Web server needs to process the request. With server-side state management, if a client switches servers in the middle of the session, the new server does not necessarily have access to the client’s state information. You can use multiple servers with server-side state management, but you need either intelligent load-balancing (to always forward requests from a client to the same server) or centralized state management (where state is stored in a central database that all Web servers access).

Advantages of Server – Side State Management:

  1. Better security: Client-side state management information can be captured (either in transit or while it is stored on the client) or maliciously modified. Therefore, you should never use client-side state management to store confidential information, such as a password, authorization level, or authentication status.

  2. Reduced bandwidth: If you store large amounts of state management information, sending that information back and forth to the client can increase bandwidth utilization and page load times, potentially increasing your costs and reducing scalability. The increased bandwidth usage affects mobile clients most of all, because they often have very slow connections. Instead, you should store large amounts of state management data (say, more than 1 KB) on the server

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