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I encountered a strange error, which I believe is a bug. Here is a minimal case, please do not comment on the usefulness of the code :)

class Foo {

    static public <X> int bar() { return 42; }

    public int baz() {
        return true ? 42 : (
            Foo.<Void>bar() > 42 ? 41 : 43
        )
        ;
    }
}

Result:

err.java:7: illegal start of expression
        Foo.<Void>bar() > 42 ? 41 : 43
            ^

I have tried SUN SDK javac 1.6.0_13 and 1.6.0_21.
The error goes away, when I either

  • make bar() non-generic (just for curiosity, not really an option)
  • remove the parentheses around the ternary expression on line 7

So it looks like that if e is an expression, it is not always valid to write (e)?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The posted code compiles (and runs) just fine for me using Eclipse, but I can confirm that javac fails to compile this. I suspect you've found a compiler bug in javac.

It would probably be a good idea to report it.

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Thanks Joachim. That's what I feared (I am stuck with standard SDK javac 1.6. at the moment). Will have to search bug database at Sun/Oracle to find out if it is fixed. –  Ingo Mar 23 '11 at 12:01
1  
The bug is already some 3 years old, but won't be fixed in jdk 1.6 apparently. However, it is fixed in jdk 1.7 beta 14 (the developer preview is b189, so it is fixed there).) –  Ingo Mar 30 '11 at 16:37
    
@Ingo: care to add a link to the bug you found? –  Paŭlo Ebermann Apr 8 '11 at 14:18
    
@Paulo: To mo sorrow, yes, because at Oracle site the bug is not shown. However, thanks Google caching, if one is lucky one may find it there. The Bug ID was 6608961 and it tells it's a duplicate of bug 6481655 "which has been fixed in Java 7, beta 27." Hope this helps nevertheless. –  Ingo Apr 8 '11 at 16:37
3  

The bug is already some 3 years old, but won't be fixed in jdk 1.6 apparently. However, it is fixed in jdk 1.7 beta 14 (the developer preview is b185, so it is fixed there, I've tried it).

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I managed to compile it with a little change in the code.So,I guess that it is something to do with conditional operator specification(which is bit complex) or a bug.But this problem occurs only in conditional operator.

class Foo {

    static public <X> int bar() { return 42; }

    public int baz() {
        return true ? 42 : (
            ((int)Foo.<Void>bar()) > 42 ? 41 : 43
        );
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Cool! Looks like the compiler is confused and thinks that "(Foo" must start a cast? –  Ingo Mar 23 '11 at 12:26
    
@Ingo: You are right. but the general guideline is Don't use conditional operator with mixed data type(simply because spec is bit complex). but you are not using mixed type in this case. –  Prince John Wesley Mar 23 '11 at 12:28

is the return Value, you don't have to specify this by calling a static method:

class Foo {

    static public <X> int bar() { return 42; }

    public int baz() {
        return true ? 42 : (
            Foo.bar() > 42 ? 41 : 43     
        )
        ;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Declaring <Void> does not specify the return value, it specifies the type argument here! –  Joachim Sauer Mar 23 '11 at 11:56
    
As I tried to explain, this code is purely for demonstration. Believe me, in the real program, the type argument is indispensable. –  Ingo Mar 23 '11 at 12:03

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