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I am a little confused over the two terminologies and would be glad to get some doubts clarified.

As I understand function overloading means having multiple methods in the same class with same name but either with different number of arguments, different types of arguments or sequence of arguments irrespective of the return type which has no effect in mangled name of the functions.

Does the above definition also include "....in the same class or across related classes(related through inheritance)....."

And Function Overriding is related to virtual functions, same method signature(declared virtual in Base class) and overridden for implementation in Sub Classes.

I was wondering at a scenario, following is the code:

#include <iostream>

class A
{
    public:
    void doSomething(int i, int j)
    {
        cout<<"\nInside A::doSomething\n";
    }
};

class B: public A
{
    public:
    void doSomething(int i, int j)
    {
        cout<<"\nInside B::doSomething\n";

    }
};

int main()
{
    B obj;
    obj.doSomething(1,2);
    return 0;

} 

In the above scenario, What can be said:
The method in derived class overrides method in Base class OR
The method in derived class overloads method in Base Class

Does Overloading apply across class scopes and does overriding term doesn't necessarily apply to virtual functions?

I think it should be overides, but just need the clarification because i happen to remember the term overidding being used specifically with virtual functions.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In this case neither. The derived-class method hides the base-class method.

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3  
Sometimes hiding a function is called overloading - in effect you're overloading on the static type of this as well as the types of the "other" parameters. But unless you replace all of the overloads in the base class, you're subtracting as well as adding, so its not quite the same as just overloading a free function. Possibly the use of "overload" is therefore incorrect, but certainly I've encountered it and used it myself. –  Steve Jessop Mar 23 '11 at 14:20
    
@Steve and @Space: Is this not overriding? This surely isn't function hiding, since if it is, then you can unhide it in the derived class, and then both function will be available. But that is not the case. Its overriding! –  Nawaz May 6 '11 at 12:03
1  
@Steve, @Nawaz, @Space: Actually, this is called overriding. "Overloading" is strictly when you have several functions with a different argument list (or member functions with different cv-qualifications). –  sbi May 6 '11 at 12:48
    
@sbi: I see you edit formatted @AProgrammers answer which says it is case of hiding and the comment above from you says its overridding, its contradictory.... –  Alok Save May 6 '11 at 12:56
1  
@Als: I didn't judge @AProgrammer's answer, I only corrected obvious typos. I have meanwhile provided my own answer. –  sbi May 6 '11 at 13:00
  • hiding is when a definition in a scope is not accessible due to a declaration in a nested scope or a derived class (3.3.7/1).

A name can be hidden by an explicit declaration of that same name in a nested declarative region or derived class.

  • overriding is when a virtual member is replaced in a derived class (see 10.3/2)

If a virtual member function vf is declared in a class Base and in a class Derived, derived directly or indirectly from Base, a member function vf with the same name and same parameter list as Base::vf is declared, then Derived::vf is also virtual an it overrides Base::vf.

  • overloading is when several declarations coexist for the same name in the same scope (13/1)

When two or more different declarations are specified for a single name in the same scope, that name is said to be overloaded.

  • related, there is also the possibility of replacing operator new and delete from the standard library by one's own implementation (18.4.1.1/2, 18.4.1.1/6, 18.4.1.1/11, 18.4.1.2)

So this is clearly a case of hiding.

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Overloading is the process of defining multiple methods with identical names but different signatures; Overriding is when a function in a child class has an identical signature to a virtual function in a parent class.

class Test {
  // Test::func is overloaded
  virtual void func(int x);
  virtual void func(double y);
};

class Child : public Test {
  // Child::func overrides Test::func
  virtual void func(int x); 
};
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Your func(int x) is hiding, not overriding, need virtual keyword. –  James Michael Hare Mar 23 '11 at 14:16
    
Yep, much better :-) –  James Michael Hare Mar 23 '11 at 14:18
    
To be very frank I do understand the difference between overloading and overidding as you explained it. I am just confused about the particular example i quoted. As i understand now its neither its just derived class hiding the Base class method as there is no overload resolution between derived and Base class. And overidding specifically needs the virtual keyword. –  Alok Save Mar 23 '11 at 14:22
1  
This also demonstrates another feature >;-( of C++. When you call child.func(1.2)you actually call the int version even though you are passing a double. This is because name resolution will stop in the child because the method name matches and thus you don't get the overloaded choice of the base (unless you explicitly bring these declaration from the parent into the child with the using clause). –  Loki Astari Mar 23 '11 at 15:27
    
This is hiding, overloading, and overriding all in one! Child::func(int) overrides the overloaded Test::func(int) and hides the overloaded Test::func(double). Call child.test(3.141592653589793) and you will be calling Child::test(int), with pi converted to an int. –  David Hammen Jul 8 '11 at 8:15

Function overloading is when you have several functions which differ in their parameter list or, if they are member functions, in their const/volatile qualification. (In some other languages you can also overload based on the return type, but C++ doesn't allow that.)
Examples:

void f(int);
void f(char);

class some_class {
  void g();
  void g() const;
};

Function overriding is when you redefine a base class function with the same signature. Usually this only makes sense if the base class function is virtual, because otherwise the function to be called (base or derived class' version) is determined at compile-time using a reference's/pointer's static type.
Examples:

class base {
  void f();
  virtual void g();
};

class derived : public base {
  void f();
  void g();
};

Function hiding is when you define a function ina derived class (or an inner scope) that has a different parameter list than a function with the same name declared in a base class (or outer scope). In this case the derived class' function(s) hides the base class function(s). You can avoid that by explicitly bringing the base class function(s) into the derived class' scope with a using declaration.
Examples:

class base {
  void f(int);
  void f(char);
};

class derived1 : public base {
  void f(double);
};

void f()
{
  derived1 d;
  d.f(42); // calls derived1::f(double)!
}

class derived2 : public base {
  using base::f; // bring base class versions into derived2's scope
  void f(double);
};

void g()
{
  derived2 d;
  d.f(42); // calls base::f(int)!
}

Just in case it's unclear: Based on these definitions, I'd call the scenario in question here overriding.

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1  
Please provide a reference from the standard that redefining a non-virtual base class function in C++, using the same signature, is "overriding". I don't think that's correct. –  Steve Jessop May 6 '11 at 15:50
    
@Steve: I'm notoriously bad when it comes to reading the standard, I guess I just can't stand its meter. However, the official C++ FAQ seems to support my terminology: parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/strange-inheritance.html#faq-23.8 –  sbi May 6 '11 at 16:29
    
For what its worth, in C++0x, when dealing with explicit class definitions, the specifier override is only applicable to virtual functions. –  Dennis Zickefoose May 6 '11 at 17:09
    
@sbi: hmm. That FAQ-lite entry seems to me to be talking about non-virtual functions in classes that will be used for dynamic polymorphism (otherwise I think it's completely wrong). It's not clear to me whether "override" is in jargon-quotes or snigger-quotes, since the thrust of the entry is that it doesn't work as an override and therefore shouldn't be done. –  Steve Jessop May 6 '11 at 17:19
3  
Anyway, overrides is defined in the standard in 10.3/2, and nowhere else that I can find. That mention refers exclusively to virtual functions, and I can't find any use of the string "overrid" in C++03 that refers to non-virtual functions. Different people use different terminology, of course, but as far as I can tell C++ standard terminology is that override => virtual. –  Steve Jessop May 6 '11 at 17:28

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