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I'm trying to handle the Timer's exception. It would be nice if the class had something like HandlerExceptionEvent so that we could add some event to log something or stop the timer.

PS: I don't want to add a try/catch block inside ElapsedEventHandler().

class Program
{
static void Main(string[] args) {
  System.Timers.Timer t = new System.Timers.Timer(1000);
  t.Elapsed += new System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler(t_Elapsed);
  t.Start();     

  System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10000);
  t.Stop();
  Console.WriteLine("\nDone.");      
  Console.ReadLine();
}

 static void t_Elapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e) {
   Console.WriteLine("Ping!");
   throw new Exception("Error!");
 }
}
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3  
Why don't you want to add try-catch inside the event handler? –  Albin Sunnanbo Mar 23 '11 at 14:45
    
Because i know how to do the try/catch. :-) I want to know if i could use something that i don't know. –  Makah Mar 24 '11 at 14:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

PS: I don't want to add "try/catch Exception" inside ElapsedEventHandler()

Since the Timer class doesn't support such an event how would you otherwise catch an exception?

If you insist on using the Timer class then perhaps this is your only option:

var t = new System.Timers.Timer(1000);
t.Elapsed += (sender, e) => { 
    try 
    { 
        t_Elapsed(sender, e); 
    } 
    catch (Exception ex) 
    { 
        // Error handling here...
    } 
};

This way the actual handler t_Elapsed doesn't contain any error handling and you can create a wrapper class for the Timer class that hides this implementation detail and in turn provides an event for exception handling.

Here's one way to do that:

class ExceptionHandlingTimer
{
    public event Action<Exception> Error;

    System.Timers.Timer t;

    public ExceptionHandlingTimer(double interval)
    {
        t = new System.Timers.Timer(interval);
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        t.Start();
    }

    public void AddElapsedEventHandler(ElapsedEventHandler handler)
    {
        t.Elapsed += (sender, e) =>
        {
            try
            {
                handler(sender, e);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                if (Error != null)
                {
                    Error(ex);
                }
                else
                {
                    throw;
                }
            }
        };
    }
}
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1  
+1 - While the lambda conveniently gets around the scope issues of making your own specific callback, the elapsed callback does contain error handling =D –  Tejs Mar 23 '11 at 14:52
    
@Tejs I'm not following... There's no way to catch an error there using the Timer class if you don't have a try/catch block. –  John Leidegren Mar 23 '11 at 14:59
    
Correct. Not saying anything is wrong =D –  Tejs Mar 23 '11 at 15:02
    
Do you know any class that is similar with X but has HandlerException? –  Makah Mar 23 '11 at 15:55
2  
@Makah - Well, I've provided you with one, why don't use the one I've written for you? –  John Leidegren Mar 23 '11 at 19:55

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