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I've the following json:

{
    "slate" : {
        "id" : {
            "type" : "integer"
        },
        "name" : {
            "type" : "string"
        },
        "code" : {
            "type" : "integer",
            "fk" : "banned.id"
        }
    },
    "banned" : {
        "id" : {
            "type" : "integer"
        },
        "domain" : {
            "type" : "string"
        }
    }
}

I'd like to figure out the best decoding way to have an easily browsable python object presentation of it.

I tried:

import json

jstr = #### my json code above #### 
obj = json.JSONDecoder().decode(jstr)

for o in obj:
  for t in o: 
    print (o)

But I get:

    f       
    s
    l
    a
    t
    e
    b
    a
    n
    n
    e
    d

And I don't understand what's the deal. The ideal would be a tree (even a list organized in a tree way) that I could browse somehow like:

for table in myList:
    for field in table:
         print (field("type"))
         print (field("fk"))  

Is the Python's built-in JSON API extent wide enough to reach this expectation?

share|improve this question
1  
There is an additional , on the second to last line of your JSON data. –  Sven Marnach Mar 23 '11 at 14:55
    
I fixed that one –  CoolStraw Mar 23 '11 at 14:57

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You seem to need help iterating over the returned object, as well as decoding the JSON.

import json

#jstr = "... that thing above ..."
# This line only decodes the JSON into a structure in memory:
obj = json.loads(jstr)
# obj, in this case, is a dictionary, a built-in Python type.

# These lines just iterate over that structure.
for ka, va in obj.iteritems():
    print ka
    for kb, vb in va.iteritems():
        print '  ' + kb
        for key, string in vb.iteritems():
            print '    ' + repr((key, string))
share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you man. That's the perfect answer :). –  CoolStraw Mar 23 '11 at 15:05

This worked well for me, and the printing is simpler than explicitly looping through the object like in Thanatos' answer:

import json
from pprint import pprint

jstr = #### my json code above #### 
obj = json.loads(jstr)

pprint(obj)

This uses the "Data Pretty Printer" (pprint) module, the documentation for which can be found here.

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The signature of JSONDecoder is

class json.JSONDecoder([encoding[, object_hook[, parse_float[, parse_int[, 
    parse_constant[, strict[, object_pairs_hook]]]]]]])

and does not accept the JSON string in the constructur. Look at its decode() method.

http://docs.python.org/library/json.html#json.JSONDecoder

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The String you provide in the example is not valid JSON.

The last comma between two closing curly braces is illegal.

Anyway you should follow Sven's suggestion and use loads instead.

share|improve this answer
    
I fixed it. But I still can't browse as I'm expecting. Am gonna update my question –  CoolStraw Mar 23 '11 at 14:57

The deal I guess is that you create a decoder, but never tell it to decode().

Use:

o = json.JSONDecoder().decode(jstr)
share|improve this answer
    
Good point. But: for o in obj: for t in o: print(t) s l a t e b a n n e d –  CoolStraw Mar 23 '11 at 14:57
1  
For your JSON, Python is going to return a dict (dictionary) object. By default, iterating over it gets the keys, which are strings. Iterating over a string gets you characters. You can use .iteritems() to get tuples of (key, value), or .itervalues() to get just values in your for loop on the dictionary. –  Thanatos Mar 23 '11 at 14:59
1  
@CoolStraw, the result of decode() is a python dictionary. You'll probably want to iterator over o.items(), as it is you are iterating over the keys and then over the letters in the keys –  Winston Ewert Mar 23 '11 at 14:59
    
Thank you very much guys ! I got the point :) it's working :) –  CoolStraw Mar 23 '11 at 15:02

Try

obj = json.loads(jstr)

instead of

obj = json.JSONDecoder(jstr)
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