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This would appear to imply "no". Which is unfortunate.

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Interface | AttributeTargets.Class,
 AllowMultiple = true, Inherited = true)]
public class CustomDescriptionAttribute : Attribute
{
    public string Description { get; private set; }

    public CustomDescriptionAttribute(string description)
    {
        Description = description;
    }
}

[CustomDescription("IProjectController")]
public interface IProjectController
{
    void Create(string projectName);
}

internal class ProjectController : IProjectController
{
    public void Create(string projectName)
    {
    }
}

[TestFixture]
public class CustomDescriptionAttributeTests
{
    [Test]
    public void ProjectController_ShouldHaveCustomDescriptionAttribute()
    {
        Type type = typeof(ProjectController);
        object[] attributes = type.GetCustomAttributes(
            typeof(CustomDescriptionAttribute),
            true);

        // NUnit.Framework.AssertionException:   Expected: 1   But was:  0
        Assert.AreEqual(1, attributes.Length);
    }
}

Can a class inherit attributes from an interface? Or am I barking up the wrong tree here?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 36 down vote accepted

No. Whenever implementing an interface or overriding members in a derived class, you need to re-declare the attributes.

If you only care about ComponentModel (not direct reflection), there is a way ([AttributeProvider]) of suggesting attributes from an existing type (to avoid duplication), but it is only valid for property and indexer usage.

As an example:

using System;
using System.ComponentModel;
class Foo {
    [AttributeProvider(typeof(IListSource))]
    public object Bar { get; set; }

    static void Main() {
        var bar = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(typeof(Foo))["Bar"];
        foreach (Attribute attrib in bar.Attributes) {
            Console.WriteLine(attrib);
        }
    }
}

outputs:

System.SerializableAttribute
System.ComponentModel.AttributeProviderAttribute
System.ComponentModel.EditorAttribute
System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComVisibleAttribute
System.Runtime.InteropServices.ClassInterfaceAttribute
System.ComponentModel.TypeConverterAttribute
System.ComponentModel.MergablePropertyAttribute
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Are you sure about this? The MemberInfo.GetCustomAttributes method takes an argument that tells if the inheritance tree should be searched. –  Rune Grimstad Feb 12 '09 at 10:59
1  
Hmm. I just noticed that the question is about inheriting attributes from an interface not from a base class. –  Rune Grimstad Feb 12 '09 at 11:00
    
Is there any reason to put attributes on interfaces then? –  Ryan Penfold Jun 19 '13 at 19:36
3  
@Ryan - sure : for describing the interface. For example, service contracts. –  Marc Gravell Jun 19 '13 at 20:28
    
Marc (and @Rune): Yes, the OP was about interfaces. But the first sentence of your answer might be confusing: "...or overriding members in a derived class..." - this is not necessarily true. You can have your class inherit attributes from its base class. You only can't do that with interfaces. See also: stackoverflow.com/questions/12106566/… –  chiccodoro Jul 30 at 9:04

You can define a useful extension method ...

Type type = typeof(ProjectController);
var attributes = type.GetCustomAttributes<CustomDescriptionAttribute>( true );

Here is the extension method:

/// <summary>Searches and returns attributes. The inheritance chain is not used to find the attributes.</summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of attribute to search for.</typeparam>
/// <param name="type">The type which is searched for the attributes.</param>
/// <returns>Returns all attributes.</returns>
public static T[] GetCustomAttributes<T>( this Type type ) where T : Attribute
{
  return GetCustomAttributes( type, typeof( T ), false ).Select( arg => (T)arg ).ToArray();
}

/// <summary>Searches and returns attributes.</summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of attribute to search for.</typeparam>
/// <param name="type">The type which is searched for the attributes.</param>
/// <param name="inherit">Specifies whether to search this member's inheritance chain to find the attributes. Interfaces will be searched, too.</param>
/// <returns>Returns all attributes.</returns>
public static T[] GetCustomAttributes<T>( this Type type, bool inherit ) where T : Attribute
{
  return GetCustomAttributes( type, typeof( T ), inherit ).Select( arg => (T)arg ).ToArray();
}

/// <summary>Private helper for searching attributes.</summary>
/// <param name="type">The type which is searched for the attribute.</param>
/// <param name="attributeType">The type of attribute to search for.</param>
/// <param name="inherit">Specifies whether to search this member's inheritance chain to find the attribute. Interfaces will be searched, too.</param>
/// <returns>An array that contains all the custom attributes, or an array with zero elements if no attributes are defined.</returns>
private static object[] GetCustomAttributes( Type type, Type attributeType, bool inherit )
{
  if( !inherit )
  {
    return type.GetCustomAttributes( attributeType, false );
  }

  var attributeCollection = new Collection<object>();
  var baseType = type;

  do
  {
    baseType.GetCustomAttributes( attributeType, true ).Apply( attributeCollection.Add );
    baseType = baseType.BaseType;
  }
  while( baseType != null );

  foreach( var interfaceType in type.GetInterfaces() )
  {
    GetCustomAttributes( interfaceType, attributeType, true ).Apply( attributeCollection.Add );
  }

  var attributeArray = new object[attributeCollection.Count];
  attributeCollection.CopyTo( attributeArray, 0 );
  return attributeArray;
}

/// <summary>Applies a function to every element of the list.</summary>
private static void Apply<T>( this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, Action<T> function )
{
  foreach( var item in enumerable )
  {
    function.Invoke( item );
  }
}
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This only gets type-level attributes, not properties, fields or members, right? –  Maslow Jun 8 '11 at 18:52
    
This solution worked for me :D +1 –  acidzombie24 Apr 13 '12 at 13:55
    
very useful! thank you –  Pauli Østerø Mar 22 '13 at 15:17
4  
very nice, I personally use a shorter version of this, now: private static IEnumerable<T> GetCustomAttributesIncludingBaseInterfaces<T>(this Type type) { var attributeType = typeof(T); return type.GetCustomAttributes(attributeType, true).Union(type.GetInterfaces().SelectMany(interfaceType => interfaceType.GetCustomAttributes(attributeType, true))).Distinct().Cast<T>(); } –  Simon D. Apr 18 '13 at 13:11
1  
@SimonD.: And your refactored solution is faster. –  mynkow Dec 2 '13 at 14:50

An article by Brad Wilson about this: Interface Attributes != Class Attributes

To summarise: classes don't inherit from interfaces, they implement them. This means that the attributes are not automatically part of the implementation.

If you need to inherit attributes, use an abstract base class, rather than an interface.

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While a C# class does not inherit attributes from its interfaces, there is a useful alternative when binding models in ASP.NET MVC3.

If you declare the view's model to be the interface rather than the concrete type, then the view and the model binder will apply the attributes (e.g., [Required] or [DisplayName("Foo")] from the interface when rendering and validating the model:

public interface IModel {
    [Required]
    [DisplayName("Foo Bar")]
    string FooBar { get; set; }
} 

public class Model : IModel {
    public string FooBar { get; set; }
}

Then in the view:

@* Note use of interface type for the view model *@
@model IModel 

@* This control will receive the attributes from the interface *@
@Html.EditorFor(m => m.FooBar)
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