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void catchlabel()
{
    if(vecs.empty())
        return;
    else
    {
    cout << "The Sizeof the Vector is: " << vecs.size() << endl; 
    cout << "Currently Stored Labels: " << endl;
    /* Error 1 */
for ( int i = 1, vector<string>::iterator it = vecs.begin(); it != vecs.end(); ++it , i++) 
             cout << i << ". "<< *it << endl;
            cout << endl;
    }
}

I get the following error for:

1> error C2146: syntax error : missing ',' before identifier 'it'

How to fix this?

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2  
@Downvoter: Why are the answers all -1'd? They're all correct. –  GManNickG Mar 23 '11 at 15:37
    
Duplicate-sh: stackoverflow.com/questions/3440066/… –  GManNickG Mar 23 '11 at 15:39
    

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can't declare items of multiple types in the initial statement of a for loop, just like you can't say int i = 1, vector<string>::iterator it = vecs.begin(); as a standalone statement. You'll have to declare one of them outside the loop.

Since the C language you have never been able to declare multiple variables of different types in one statement (although pointers are a rather odd exception):

int i, double d;  /* Invalid */

int i, j; /* Valid */

This behavior is inherited by C++, and applies to each statement within a for loop as well as standalone statements.

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Why is this so? –  nightcracker Mar 23 '11 at 15:38
    
@night: See this. –  GManNickG Mar 23 '11 at 15:44
    
@GMan: I'm sorry, that wasn't useful. That just explains that it's not possible and explains workarounds. The edit of the OP explains it though. –  nightcracker Mar 23 '11 at 15:48
    
@night: That's exactly what the linked answer says...perhaps your question was "why can't I define multiple types in a declaration?", which isn't what you asked. –  GManNickG Mar 23 '11 at 15:57

You can't declare variables of two different types in the "init" part of the for loop. Move the declaration of "i" (or of "it") to outside the loop.

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You can use nice trick to not let your iterator out of scope:

void catchlabel()
{
    if(vecs.empty())
        return;
    else
    {
    cout << "The Sizeof the Vector is: " << vecs.size() << endl; 
    cout << "Currently Stored Labels: " << endl;
    /* Error 1 */
    {
    vector<string>::iterator it = vecs.begin()
    for ( int i = 1; it != vecs.end(); ++it , i++) 
             cout << i << ". "<< *it << endl;
            cout << endl;
    }
    }
}

And I would say that if you need to manipulate both elements and their indexes it is simpler to use indexes in 'for' loop, not iterators.

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Your for loop is wrong. You cannot declare variables of different type in the initialization part of for!

Do this:

int i = 1; 
for (vector<string>::iterator it = vecs.begin(); it != vecs.end(); ++it , i++) 
{
      cout << i << ". "<< *it << endl;
}

Or maybe, you would love just this:

for (size_t i = 0 ;  i < vecs.size(); ++i ) 
{
      cout << (i+1) << ". "<< vecs[i] << endl;
}
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4  
@Downvoter: Please specify the reason! –  Nawaz Mar 23 '11 at 15:37

You don't need to count the element specifically, you can just calculate the distance from vecs.begin() as you go along:

void catchlabel()
{
    if(!vecs.empty())
    {
        cout << "The Sizeof the Vector is: " << vecs.size() << endl; 
        cout << "Currently Stored Labels: " << endl;
        for (vector<string>::iterator it = vecs.begin(); it != vecs.end(); ++it)
            cout << (it - vecs.begin() + 1) << ". "<< *it << endl; 
        cout << endl;
    }
}
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