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I'm interested in creating a Javascript game engine (or rather, a JS game, but I might have to build my own game engine for what I have in mind). I have no prior game programming experience, nor do I know all that much about it to be honest.

What are some good online resources, tutorials, engines, open source projects, or anything related that I could start with?

My main interest for this lies in making an MMORPG. Yes, I do realize that an MMORPG is probably one of the most complex projects I could take on right from the start, but I need an ambitious end result to keep me engaged in learning all this.

And if there are any game engines built on top of node js, even better!

Thanks.

EDIT: I should also note that, this is more of a discovery phase for me, to find out if I have the bandwidth to take this on, or if I even have the determination to go through with it all. Technically speaking, I'm more interested in the creation phase of the game (world building, battle/leveling/stats systems, UI, etc.) rather than the actual programming or sprite designing. But given that I don't know any game developers, there's probably no other way of me realizing my game concepts and ideas unless I build it.

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@Alex as a side note, I'm trying to develop something similar. Feel free to use the SO chat to discuss javascript and node related concepts. –  Raynos Mar 23 '11 at 16:14
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Which kind of MMORPG are you trying to build? Be more specific. Are you trying to build a new WoW? Or just something like those browser based rpg games (archmage, fivepillars and stuff)? –  masylum Mar 23 '11 at 17:14
    
@alex you realise the "creation phase" your interested in is probably 5% of the programming/designing work if your writing all of it from scratch. (Excluding graphics/audio work) and with SSJS unless you wait 6 months / year that's the only option you have. –  Raynos Mar 23 '11 at 17:20
    
@masylum you assume he isn't trying to build a "new WoW" because that's not possible for a small unfinanced team. –  Raynos Mar 23 '11 at 17:21
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@raynos, what? I ask him which kind of MMORPG is trying to build as it would require different kind of engines. Does he need a 3D engine? isometric? it will be text-based? –  masylum Mar 23 '11 at 17:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I recommend you read articles on gamedev, like : good ebooks and why is an mmorpg hard to make.

There are a few libraries out there for clientside javascript game development like craftyjs and the render engine.

There are also tools like Game Closure that allow you to write game (I highly recommend and anticipate this one for its native mobile support).

In terms of libraries and tools for a server side game engine in node.js, there are none. I'm in the process of writing an engine myself and it's a slow struggle.

In terms of writing actual games, you're going to have to start low and work up. Many will tell you that writing classics such as pong, tetris, breakout and mario are a must for making mistakes and learning from them.

Writing a game engine is a challenge but do-able. Writing a re-useable game engine or a library that you intend others to use for writing games on node without any experience is a very steep learning curve.

There are many struggles to overcome and many articles to read. Your question is far too broad to get specific. I recommend you try using some client side libraries to get some ideas and concepts in. As a side-note if you don't know any javascript yet, learning javascript and game development at the same time is going to be a struggle.

As a bonus note here is an OS multiplayer js game build on node.js and HTML5 Canvas NodeGame Shooter. It's a nice example but I wouldn't call it good code to learn from.

Realistically making an MMORPG in node.js/browser which is a playable beta rather then a tech demo will probably take you 2 years. Add a year if you want the engine to be re-usable as a stand-alone library. Add 6 months if you know no javascript. Add another year if you've never done programming before. Not to mention that concepts such good game design, artwork and audio are completely ignored for simplicity.

Now a tetris clone can be written in 24 hours without any prior experience.

As a further disclaimer if you wanted a real time mmo in the browser and node.js you're going to have to write your own latency hiding mechanism. I've been hitting a brick wall with that for 4 months. You're going to have to somehow make the fact it takes messages 0.2s to go between a client and a server disappear and make feedback to user input instant. And you have to do all of that without having the clients get out of sync with the server. That's a really big problem and it gets a lot worse if two users are trying to interact with the same object.

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thanks, I'll look into all the links you posted. And I wasn't aware of the latency hiding aspect of games. Good luck on your game! –  alex heyd Mar 23 '11 at 17:10
    
@alex I'll let you know if I get around to releasing a node.js game library. Feel free to ask for more specific advice or collaborate, I might actually finish it then. –  Raynos Mar 23 '11 at 17:12
    
Ooh.. I'd be willing to cooperate although I'm not sure how helpful I will be. I know Javascript, I work in an digital ad agency. Primarily use jQuery, OOP, event based and pubsub patterns. I'm interested in node.js but haven't done much with it yet. –  alex heyd Mar 23 '11 at 17:20
    
@alex let me recommend the node.js SO chat room –  Raynos Mar 23 '11 at 17:23
    
This answer is discouraging and inaccurate. It doesn't always take 2+ years to release a playable beta. With today's technology, engines, and open-source options, ONE PERSON could easily produce an online game within a few months. Maybe the "game library" you're building requires 2 years of development to make a game, but there is an extraordinary amount of options these days. It seems like every question about making games is answered by "GAMES R HARD DONT DO IT". I used to work at a social gaming startup, and am currently creating a WebGL game -- don't listen to this answer! Just start. –  benny Nov 4 '13 at 15:41

This thread is 1 year old, but just for reference:

There is an opensource html5 and node.js based MMORPG game, BrowserQuest (opensource mozilla project, MPL license).

You can try out the game here: http://browserquest.mozilla.org/

You can find the sourcecode here: https://github.com/mozilla/BrowserQuest

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This is the best answer, thank you Norbert. Also check out what WebGL is capable of in the browser + JavaScript: unrealengine.com/html5 (Unreal Engine in Firefox) –  benny Nov 4 '13 at 15:54
    
A list of html5 game engines: html5gameengine.com –  Andrew_1510 Nov 26 '13 at 14:22

Both @Raynos and @emragins said it well, I would just add link to sprite.js framework and jsgamebench which is a Facebook project oriented to explore HTML5’s game performance limits. There are also few articles and video related to this topic.

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Sprite.js is very specific. It's like mentioning socket.IO for communication abstraction. I do like jsgamebench though, thanks for showing me that –  Raynos Mar 23 '11 at 17:07

Just thought I would share this resource on github, it's a game I wrote based on NodeJS/Socket IO and written with jQuery/js/html/css.

Should be a good starting place for you..

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There is a new and strong player in town: cocos2d bindings for Javascript. It enables developers to write the game for different platforms: HTML5/mobile/desktop with the same code base but it takes advantage of the platform because on mobile the Javascript engine is using native controls and GPU acceleration while on HTML5 it depends on the browser's implementation.

You can run the test directly from the browser here.

The project is part of Cocos2D the most used 2D engine for iPhone with a big community, and supported by Zynga.

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