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To start with, I'm not new to actionscript (AS2.0) neither am I an experienced programmer in this language and I barely use any of it's object oriented features (frankly, I've never even written a class). Anyway, This is my code


var instName;
var num=0;
setInterval(createSym,100);
function createSym(){
    instName="sym"+num++;
    this.attachMovie("sym",instName,this.getNextHighestDepth());
    eval(instName)._x=100;
    eval(instName)._y=100;  
    var t1=setInterval(moveSym,8,instName);
    function moveSym(instName){
        eval(instName)._x+=1;
    }
    var t2=setInterval(checkSym,1,instName);
    function checkSym(instName){
        if(eval(instName)._x>=600){
            clearInterval(t1);
            clearInterval(t2);
            eval(instName).removeMovieClip();
        }
    }
}

At first I thought I'm having some kind of scope problem with nested functions but I've accidentally used the same logic in another program and it works perfectly (I would also appreciate some help in understanding how runtime memory is managed in languages like this). But then I realized that this code works if I change this in this.attachMovie to _root or if I change calling technique (without changing this to _root) to


setInterval(mycaller,100);
function caller(){
     createSym();
}

I can't make out how these two ways differ from each other. Thanks for any help with this :)

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The scope changes in AS2 with setInterval. Just to make sure, do trace(this) inside the callback and you'll see it's not the _root, as expected, but you can pass a container movieclip as an extra argument to the callback function so you can add the library items into.

Also, the code looks complicated for no reason:

var instName;//keep track of the new instance for each clip
var num=0;//number of symbols
setInterval(createSym,100);//create a symbol every 100 milliseconds
function createSym(){
    instName="sym"+num++;//update instance name
    this.attachMovie("sym",instName,this.getNextHighestDepth());//attach a new clip
    eval(instName)._x=100;//set initial position
    eval(instName)._y=100;  
    var t1=setInterval(moveSym,8,instName);//add another interval to move the symbol
    function moveSym(instName){
        eval(instName)._x+=1;
    }
    var t2=setInterval(checkSym,1,instName);//and another inverval to check if the clip is 'outside' limits, clear intervals and remove clip
    function checkSym(instName){
        if(eval(instName)._x>=600){
            clearInterval(t1);
            clearInterval(t2);
            eval(instName).removeMovieClip();
        }
    }
}

Each person has a coding style, so there isn't a right/wrong at this point, as long as it work. Here's how I rewrote it so it would make sense for me:

var clips:Array = [];
var currentClips:Number = 0;
var totalClips:Number = 100;
setInterval(update,40,this);//interval is at 40 ms ~ 25 fps, also pass a target movie clip to attache library items into

function update(targetClip:MovieClip) {
    if(currentClips < totalClips){//still need clips ?
        var clip:MovieClip = targetClip.attachMovie('sym','sym'+currentClips,targetClip.getNextHighestDepth());//add a clip
        clip._x = 100;//initialize position
        clip._y = Math.random() * 100;
        clips.push(clip);//update array and clips counter
        currentClips++;
    }
    //update existing clips
    for(var i:Number = 0 ; i < currentClips; i++) {
        clips[i]._x+=10;
        if(clips[i]._x > Stage.width) {//if a clips is outsite, remove it, update the array and counter, and another should be created instead
            clips[i].removeClip();
            clips.splice(i,1);
            currentClips--;
        }
    }
}

Notice that clips are removed and added each time they exit the stage, which might take a few resources, that could be saved if we simply reuse the same symbol by repositioning it:

var clips:Array = [];
var currentClips:Number = 0;
var totalClips:Number = 100;
setInterval(update,40,this);//interval is at 40 ms ~ 25 fps, also pass a target movie clip to attache library items into

function update(targetClip:MovieClip) {
    if(currentClips < totalClips){//still need clips ?
        var clip:MovieClip = targetClip.attachMovie('sym','sym'+currentClips,targetClip.getNextHighestDepth());//add a clip
        clip._y = Math.random() * 100;//initialize position
        clips.push(clip);//update array and clips counter
        currentClips++;
    }
    //update existing clips
    for(var i:Number = 0 ; i < currentClips; i++) {
        clips[i]._x+=10;
        if(clips[i]._x > Stage.width) clips[i]._x = 0;//reuse same clips, simply update position
    }
}

Also, I noticed it doesn't look very fun as is, so I've added a variable for velocity (_vx), since MovieClip is a dynamic class and you can add properties to it at runtime. Note that this isn't a good practice. The goal was to get a bit of depth in the way the clips animate:

var clips:Array = [];
var currentClips:Number = 0;
var totalClips:Number = 100;
setInterval(update,40,this);//interval is at 40 ms ~ 25 fps, also pass a target movie clip to attache library items into

function update(targetClip:MovieClip) {
    if(currentClips < totalClips){//still need clips ?
        var clip:MovieClip = targetClip.attachMovie('sym','sym'+currentClips,targetClip.getNextHighestDepth());//add a clip
        clip._y = Math.random() * 100;//initialize position
        clip._vx = 5 + Math.random() * 5;//clips have different velocities - give a bit of depth
        clips.push(clip);//update array and clips counter
        currentClips++;
    }
    //update existing clips
    for(var i:Number = 0 ; i < currentClips; i++) {
        clips[i]._x += clips[i]._vx;
        if(clips[i]._x > Stage.width) clips[i]._x = 0;//reuse same clips, simply update position
    }
}

Speaking of depth, the clips aren't depth sorted, but I diverge... Regarding your problem with _root and scope, the issue with with setInterval because scope changes, but you can use an argument to the callback to get past the issue.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank u very much for all your suggestions :) I've to admit I've a poor style. But one thing is still unexplained (or may be I didn't get it right) - how does calling a different function (mycaller) which in turn calls the function I wanted to call (createSym) reset the scope? – toofast Mar 24 '11 at 16:28
    
@backslash It's not you, it's 'them' :P I am not 100% sure how AVM1(the actionscript virtual machine running AS2 bytecode) handles setInterval internally, but it's sufficient to know that the scope changes inside the function called by setInterval. For example: trace(this); var interval:Number = setInterval(update,100); function update() { trace(this); clearInterval(interval); } – George Profenza Mar 24 '11 at 17:35
    
Also, my checkSym function is more like a collision detector which checks for collision between the movie clip created here and another movie clip whose motion is controlled by user. This is why I needed second timer - or the user can still hit other clip once it's position has been updated. (I know my original post didn't specify this). I would like some advice on how I could implement it in a better way. – toofast Mar 24 '11 at 17:40
    
@backslash You will see _level0 and undefined traced in the Output Panel. Somewhat similarly, the scope changes with listeners: trace(this); var mouseListener:Object = new Object(); mouseListener.onMouseDown = function() { trace(this); } Mouse.addListener(mouseListener); ...this will trace out _level0 and [object Object] on click, since the scope will the listener object. Does this help ? – George Profenza Mar 24 '11 at 17:45
    
@backslash I've noticed your inner intervals (t1 and t2) and I don't think they're necessary. If you can keep track of your clips, you can do all the updating in one function. Notice that in my version of the code, I only use a single interval and manage clip creation and position updating in both. – George Profenza Mar 24 '11 at 17:47

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