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I'm pretty new to Ruby so apologies if this is an obvious question.

I'd like to use named parameters when instantiating a Struct, i.e. be able to specify which items in the Struct get what values, and default the rest to nil.

For example I want to do:

Movie = Struct.new :title, :length, :rating
m = Movie.new :title => 'Some Movie', :rating => 'R'

This doesn't work.

So I came up with the following:

class MyStruct < Struct
  # Override the initialize to handle hashes of named parameters
  def initialize *args
    if (args.length == 1 and args.first.instance_of? Hash) then
      args.first.each_pair do |k, v|
        if members.include? k then
          self[k] = v
        end
      end
    else
      super *args
    end
  end
end

Movie = MyStruct.new :title, :length, :rating
m = Movie.new :title => 'Some Movie', :rating => 'R'

This seems to work just fine, but I'm not sure if there's a better way of doing this, or if I'm doing something pretty insane. If anyone can validate/rip apart this approach, I'd be most grateful.

UPDATE

I ran this initially in 1.9.2 and it works fine; however having tried it in other versions of Ruby (thank you rvm), it works/doesn't work as follows:

  • 1.8.7: Not working
  • 1.9.1: Working
  • 1.9.2: Working
  • JRuby (set to run as 1.9.2): not working

JRuby is a problem for me, as I'd like to keep it compatible with that for deployment purposes.

YET ANOTHER UPDATE

In this ever-increasing rambling question, I experimented with the various versions of Ruby and discovered that Structs in 1.9.x store their members as symbols, but in 1.8.7 and JRuby, they are stored as strings, so I updated the code to be the following (taking in the suggestions already kindly given):

class MyStruct < Struct
  # Override the initialize to handle hashes of named parameters
  def initialize *args
    return super unless (args.length == 1 and args.first.instance_of? Hash)
    args.first.each_pair do |k, v|
      self[k] = v if members.map {|x| x.intern}.include? k
    end
  end
end

Movie = MyStruct.new :title, :length, :rating
m = Movie.new :title => 'Some Movie', :rating => 'R'

This now appears to work for all the flavours of Ruby that I've tried.

share|improve this question
    
Your code looks just fine, really. – Mladen Jablanović Mar 23 '11 at 21:19
    
I have been looking for this same thing - is there a standard gem that does this, along with specifying which arguments are required? – Jonathan Swartz Feb 22 '13 at 17:49
    
github.com/chemica/solid-struct does this, but doesn't enforce required arguments. – A Fader Darkly Jun 20 '15 at 12:47

10 Answers 10

The less you know, the better. No need to know whether the underlying data structure uses symbols or string, or even whether it can be addressed as a Hash. Just use the attribute setters:

class KwStruct < Struct.new(:qwer, :asdf, :zxcv)
  def initialize *args
    opts = args.last.is_a?(Hash) ? args.pop : Hash.new
    super *args
    opts.each_pair do |k, v|
      self.send "#{k}=", v
    end
  end
end

It takes both positional and keyword arguments:

> KwStruct.new "q", :zxcv => "z"
 => #<struct KwStruct qwer="q", asdf=nil, zxcv="z">
share|improve this answer

Have you considered OpenStruct?

require 'ostruct'

person = OpenStruct.new(:name => "John", :age => 20)
p person               # #<OpenStruct name="John", age=20>
p person.name          # "John"
p person.adress        # nil
share|improve this answer
3  
Caveat: OpenStruct instance will allow practically any attribute assigned: person.feather_color = :blue will work with your example. Struct doesn't allow this. – Mladen Jablanović Mar 23 '11 at 21:15
    
Thanks for the suggestion; I had a look at OpenStruct and seemed to be somewhere between a Struct and a hash. In the past I've uses hashes, but the primary reason I want to try out Structs is that they strictly define their members, as with data based on hashes and OpenStruct they're arbitrary and it can be difficult to maintain if the data structure isn't well documented. With Structs it is easy to tell what should be in there (though what can and cannot be nil is another matter entirely). – Matt S. Mar 24 '11 at 9:01
    
I suggest only using OpenStruct for config or similar but NOT for regular development. Getting nil for ANY missing message will hurt you – ecoologic Sep 8 '14 at 14:33
    
OpenStructs are also very slow in use: stackoverflow.com/questions/1177594/ruby-struct-vs-openstruct – A Fader Darkly Apr 29 '15 at 10:37

You could rearrange the ifs.

class MyStruct < Struct
  # Override the initialize to handle hashes of named parameters
  def initialize *args
    # I think this is called a guard clause
    # I suspect the *args is redundant but I'm not certain
    return super *args unless (args.length == 1 and args.first.instance_of? Hash)
    args.first.each_pair do |k, v|
      # I can't remember what having the conditional on the same line is called
      self[k] = v if members.include? k
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Your code looks far more Ruby-like and clean. I'll definitely adopt that style; thanks for that! – Matt S. Mar 24 '11 at 9:04

Based on @Andrew Grimm's answer, but using Ruby 2.0's keyword arguments:

class Struct

  # allow keyword arguments for Structs
  def initialize(*args, **kwargs)
    param_hash = kwargs.any? ? kwargs : Hash[ members.zip(args) ]
    param_hash.each { |k,v| self[k] = v }
  end

end

Note that this does not allow mixing of regular and keyword arguments-- you can only use one or the other.

share|improve this answer
    
a call to super(*args) allows the mixing of positional and keyword arguments, and affords considerable simplification of the remaining lines. – Wayne Conrad Dec 24 '14 at 15:16

If you do need to mix regular and keyword arguments, you can always construct the initializer by hand...

Movie = Struct.new(:title, :length, :rating) do
  def initialize(title, length: 0, rating: 'PG13')
    self.title = title
    self.length = length
    self.rating = rating
  end
end

m = Movie.new('Star Wars', length: 'too long')
=> #<struct Movie title="Star Wars", length="too long", rating="PG13">

This has the title as a mandatory first argument just for illustration. It also has the advantage that you can set defaults for each keyword argument (though that's unlikely to be helpful if dealing with Movies!).

share|improve this answer

A solution that only allows Ruby keyword arguments (Ruby >=2.0).

class KeywordStruct < Struct
  def initialize(**kwargs)
    super(kwargs.keys)
    kwargs.each { |k, v| self[k] = v }
  end
end

Usage:

class Foo < KeywordStruct.new(:bar, :baz, :qux)
end


foo = Foo.new(bar: 123, baz: true)
foo.bar  # --> 123
foo.baz  # --> true
foo.qux  # --> nil
foo.fake # --> NoMethodError

This kind of structure can be really useful as a value object especially if you like more strict method accessors which will actually error instead of returning nil (a la OpenStruct).

share|improve this answer

For a 1-to-1 equivalent with the Struct behavior (raise when the required argument is not given) I use this sometimes (Ruby 2+):

def Struct.keyed(*attribute_names)
  Struct.new(*attribute_names) do
    def initialize(**kwargs)
      attr_values = attribute_names.map{|a| kwargs.fetch(a) }
      super(*attr_values)
    end
  end
end

and from there on

class SimpleExecutor < Struct.keyed :foo, :bar
  ...
end

This will raise a KeyError if you missed an argument, so real nice for stricter constructors and constructors with lots of arguments, data transfer objects and the like.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is good if you want all args to be required. Two improvements to avoid unnecessary inheritance: 1) Class.new isn't needed; just use Struct.new(...) do ... end ; 2) Just assign instead of inheriting: SimpleExecutor = Struct.keyed ... – Kelvin Feb 4 at 22:48
    
Ah so Struct.new allows method definitions and drops you into the constructor body! very cool @Kelvin didn't know that, thanks – Julik 23 hours ago

this doesn't exactly answer the question but I found it to work well if you have say a hash of values you wish to structify. It has the benefit of offloading the need to remember the order of attributes while also not needing to subClass Struct.

MyStruct = Struct.new(:height, :width, :length)

hash = {height: 10, width: 111, length: 20}

MyStruct.new(*MyStruct.members.map {|key| hash[key] })

share|improve this answer

Ruby 2.x only (2.1 if you want required keyword args). Only tested in MRI.

def Struct.new_with_kwargs(lamb)
  members = lamb.parameters.map(&:last)
  Struct.new(*members) do
    define_method(:initialize) do |*args|
      super(* lamb.(*args))
    end
  end
end

Foo = Struct.new_with_kwargs(
  ->(a, b=1, *splat, c:, d: 2, **kwargs) do
    # must return an array with values in the same order as lambda args
    [a, b, splat, c, d, kwargs]
  end
)

Usage:

> Foo.new(-1, 3, 4, c: 5, other: 'foo')
=> #<struct Foo a=-1, b=3, splat=[4], c=5, d=2, kwargs={:other=>"foo"}>

The minor downside is that you have to ensure the lambda returns the values in the correct order; the big upside is that you have the full power of ruby 2's keyword args.

share|improve this answer

If your hash keys are in order you can call the splat operator to the rescue:

NavLink = Struct.new(:name, :url, :title)
link = { 
  name: 'Stack Overflow', 
  url: 'https://stackoverflow.com', 
  title: 'Sure whatever' 
}
actual_link = NavLink.new(*link.values) 
#<struct NavLink name="Stack Overflow", url="https://stackoverflow.com", title="Sure whatever"> 
share|improve this answer

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