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I have an other problem with Xcode 4. I really like the new IDE but there are a few things I didn't get to work yet. One thing is to register Document Types with Xcode 4. I tried it with the old way through the plist file, but it didn't work. (Means I couldn't open a file with my app) But I don't now how to set it up with the interface of Xcode 4.

My latest try looks like this: (Copied the entry made from Xcode in the info.plist)

<key>UTExportedTypeDeclarations</key>
<array>
    <dict>
        <key>UTTypeConformsTo</key>
        <array>
            <string>public.plain-text</string>
        </array>
        <key>UTTypeDescription</key>
        <string>Configuration File</string>
        <key>UTTypeIdentifier</key>
        <string>com.myname.projec.iws</string>
    </dict>
</array>

and:

<key>CFBundleDocumentTypes</key>
<array>
    <dict>
        <key>CFBundleTypeIconFiles</key>
        <array>
            <string>AnIcon-320</string>
        </array>
        <key>CFBundleTypeName</key>
        <string>Config File</string>
        <key>LSItemContentTypes</key>
        <array>
            <string>com.myname.projec.iws</string>
        </array>
    </dict>
</array>

This does not work. The file in Mail doesn't have the option to open with my app.

Does anyone have a working example with Xcode 4 or a tutorial how to do it. I don't have any further Idea how to get it work.

Sandro

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1  
Click the TARGET in the left tree, and then click INFO. You should be able to edit the entries via Xcode rather than manually tweaking the plist. It relieves you of the need to edit the plist directly (as text or XML). –  jww Apr 2 '11 at 9:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think the role and the file extension are missing.

If you want to specify a file extension, you need to add UTTypeTagSpecification:

    <key>UTExportedTypeDeclarations</key>

<array>

    <dict>
        <key>UTTypeConformsTo</key>
        <array>
            <string>public.text</string>
        </array>
        <key>UTTypeDescription</key>
        <string>my document type</string>
        <key>UTTypeIdentifier</key>
        <string>com.mycompany.myfiletypename</string>
        <key>UTTypeTagSpecification</key>
        <dict>
            <key>public.filename-extension</key>
            <array>
                <string>iws</string>
            </array>
        </dict>
    </dict>

For the role, you need to add CFBundleTypeRole:

<key>CFBundleDocumentTypes</key>
<array>
    <dict>
        <key>CFBundleTypeName</key>
        <string>My file</string>
        <key>CFBundleTypeIconFiles</key>
        <array>
            <string>document-320.png</string>
            <string>document-64.png</string>
        </array>
        <key>LSHandlerRank</key>
        <string>Alternate</string>
        <key>CFBundleTypeRole</key>
        <string>Viewer</string>
        <key>LSItemContentTypes</key>
        <array>
            <string>com.mycompany.myfiletypename</string>

        </array>
    </dict>
</array>
share|improve this answer
    
Than kyou for your answer. It works with your description. But do you also know, how I can do this via the new GUI of Xcode4 to create this? –  Sandro Meier Mar 23 '11 at 17:44
    
No. I suppose there is a plist editor in xcode 4. But for that kind of modifications, I prefer to edit the plist as a text file. In xcode 3, you can right click on plist file and choose to edit it as a text file (or source file maybe). If you mean a specific editor for UTI, I don't know if it exists, has existed or will. But I would use it so rarely that I would forget about it anyway. Maybe I already did :) –  FKDev Mar 24 '11 at 9:29
2  
Yes sure there is a plist editor. I did it with that one and it works. But in Xcode4 there's a graphical Interface. That's why I asked. ;-) Thank you for your reply. :-D –  Sandro Meier Mar 25 '11 at 16:19

You can edit the equivalent of your 'com.mycompany.myfiletypename' by setting "Document Types" => "Item 0" => "Document OS Types" => "Item 0".

The default value is "????" which you can change to "com.mycompany.myfiletypename".

I think the other properties speak for themselves.

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I just looked at my old .plist file and cut and pasted the keys and values into the new one in Xcode 4 project that had been imported from an Xcode3 version. It apparently "loses" some of the info in the .plist for UTI's when it comes over. However, when I pasted the missing keys/values back in from .plist made with Xcode3, the new values worked AND they appear in the GUI so you can now "browse" the GUI and see what goes where. Kind of reverse engineering the GUI but it works.

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