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I was wondering whether or not it is necessary to use <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href=...> over <link rel="stylesheet" href=...>. The rel="stylesheet" marks the information that it is a stylesheet - so text/css doesn't actually add anything as far as I'm concerned.

The only stylesheet format used by HTML is CSS anyway, so what does text/css 'say' to the browser? Some websites seem to add the type="text/css" attribute (http://www.jquery.com/), whilst other ones don't (http://www.youtube.com/).

So, what is the use of type="text/css" in a <link rel="stylesheet"> element, and is it necessary to include it?

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It may have been implemented to act as a fallback for servers which don't return the correct MIME-type on .css files, but it seems it wasn't ever necessary. I use it just for consistency's sake. –  drudge Mar 23 '11 at 17:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 43 down vote accepted

It's not required with the HTML5 spec, but for older versions of HTML is it required.

Html 4 W3.org spec

http://www.w3.org/TR/html40/struct/links.html#edef-LINK http://www.w3.org/TR/html40/present/styles.html

Type stands for The MIME type of the style sheet. The only supported value I have ever seen is Text/CSS, which is why HTML5 has probably dropped it. I imagine they had it for earlier versions to allow future expansion possibilities which never happened.

Using HTML5 and not specifying the type, I have run so far into no problems with compatibility even when testing older versions of IE.

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it may be required in the HTML4 spec, but no browsers actually enforce it. –  Spudley Mar 23 '11 at 17:29
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well, there is a type for "image/ico" –  maxisam Jul 9 '13 at 14:29

It's not required, no.

The part of the HTML Living Standard you're interested in is The link element, which states:

A link element must have either a rel attribute, or an itemprop attribute, or both.

For external resource links, the type attribute is used as a hint to user agents...

User agents must not consider the type attribute authoritative

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My understanding is that it's to allow the specification of stylesheets in formats other than text/css.

While that has become the dominant (and standard) delivery format for stylesheets for (X)HTML documents, the specification is actually wide enough to allow a variety of different MIME types to be passed, it's just that standard browsers don't implement them.

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