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I need a regular expression where any number is allowed with spaces, parentheses and hyphens in any order. But there must be a "+" (plus sign) at the end.

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1  
What is a 'parent` in text, please? EDIT: Ah, "parentheses", now I get it :) –  Czechnology Mar 23 '11 at 17:21
    
What did you try? What didn't work? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 23 '11 at 17:22
    
What is a "number"? 123? 3.14159? +1.2E-4? –  ridgerunner Mar 24 '11 at 3:30

2 Answers 2

If the rules mean that the whole string must be according to them, then:

/^[\d\(\)\- ]+\+$/

This will match (i) 435 (345-325) + but not (ii) my phone is 435 (345-325)+, remember it.

If you want to just extract (i) from (ii) you could use my original RegExp:

/[\d\(\)\- ]+\+/
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1  
If + should be at the and, shouldn't there be a $ at the end? –  Czechnology Mar 23 '11 at 17:22
    
That kind of depends how you interpret the question - without the $ the + will be at the end of the match. But fair enough, I added it. –  Jakub Hampl Mar 23 '11 at 17:24
    
This will also match foo123+ –  codaddict Mar 23 '11 at 17:25
    
You're right, I take it back. The question is a bit vague. –  Czechnology Mar 23 '11 at 17:25
    
I edited it to make it clear. –  Jakub Hampl Mar 23 '11 at 17:26

You can use the regex:

^[\d() -]+\+$

Explanation:

^   : Start anchor
[   : Start of char class.
 \d : Any digit
 (  : A literal (. No need to escape it as it is non-special inside char class.
 )  : A literal )
    : A space
 -  : A hyphen. To list a literal hyphen in char class place it at the beginning
      or at the end without escaping it or escape it and place it anywhere.
]   : End of char class
+   : One or more of the char listed in the char class.
\+  : A literal +. Since a + is metacharacter we need to escape it.
$   : End anchor
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Excellent answer and explanation. If I could up-vote twice, I would. –  dty Mar 23 '11 at 17:46
    
Fantastic answer. I came for the quick fix and left with knowledge. –  caltrop Jan 4 '13 at 20:07
    
first time a regex makes sense. thank you! –  Tomen Jul 28 '13 at 7:27

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