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My question is very simple, but i dint found an answer googling long time.
How to set REG_KEY_DONT_VIRTUALIZE flag to registry key created by me (i.e. HKLM\Software\MyApp)? I want my program to be user-independent. Every user starting my app should have access to the same configuration options located in that location). Changing application manifest I can disable registry virtualization by running program as administrator, but I want normal user be able to run the program and read registry values.

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2 Answers 2

If you don't want your app to be virtualized then you use a manifest to indicate that. If you use REG_KEY_DONT_VIRTUALIZE on your key then all that will happen is that all the writes will fail because your users won't have write access to HKLM.

If you want all your users to share configuration then you'll have to store the configuration in a file rather than the registry. There's nowhere appropriate in the registry that is shared by all users and allows standard users write access.

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This is pretty unclear, virtualization is only enabled for legacy non-UAC compatible programs and reading is always permitted. I have to assume that writing is the problem. Change the permissions on the key with, say, your installer or Regedit.exe so that Everybody has write access.

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Are you really advocating putting an ACL on a registry key in HKLM to all everyone write access to that key? Doesn't sound like good practice to me. –  David Heffernan Mar 23 '11 at 19:00
    
@David - allowing all users to modify a shared resource isn't a good practice, whatever it looks like. That ship already sailed. –  Hans Passant Mar 23 '11 at 19:13

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