Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In XSLT 1.0, a common question in forums was how to convert flat HTML into hierarchical XML, which many times boiled down to nesting text in between <br /> tags in <p> tags.

I have a similar problem, which I think I've partially solved using XSLT 2.0, but it's a new approach to me and I'd like to get a second opinion.

The XHTML source has <span class="pageStart"></span> scattered throughout. They can appear in several different parent nodes. I want to wrap all the nodes between one page start marker and the next in an <page> node. The solution I currently have is:

<xsl:template match="*[child::span[@class='pageStart']]">
  <xsl:copy>
    <xsl:copy-of select="@*" />
      <xsl:for-each-group select="node()" 
                          group-starting-with="span[@class='pageStart']">
        <page>
          <xsl:apply-templates select="current-group()"/>
        </page>
      </xsl:for-each-group>
  </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

There's at least one flaw with this -- the parent node of the marker gets a <page> as a child node when I don't want it. In other works, if there's a <div> that has a child page marker anywhere in it, an <page> node is created as an immediate child of <div> in addition to the locations I expect.

I had hoped that I could simply make the template rule be <xsl:template match="span[@class='pageStart']"> but current-group() seems to be empty no matter what I try. The common sense approach I tried was <xsl:for-each-group select="node()" group-starting-with="span[@class='pageStart']">.

Is there an easier way to solve this problem that I'm missing?

EDIT

Here's an example of the input:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<html>
<head></head>
<body>
    <span class="pageStart"/>
    <p>...</p>
    <div>...</div>
    <img />
    <p></p>
    <span class="pageStart"/>
    <div>...</div>
    <span class="pageStart"/>
    <p>...</p>
    <div>
        <span class="pageStart"/>
        <p>...</p>
        <p>...</p>
        <span class="pageStart"/>
        <div>...</div>
        <img/>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

I assume the last two nested pages make this problem more difficult, so I'd be perfectly happy getting this as the output, or something close:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<html>
<head></head>
<body>
    <page>
        <span class="pageStart"/>
        <p>...</p>
        <div>...</div>
        <img />
        <p></p>
    </page>
    <page>
        <span class="pageStart"/>
        <div>...</div>
    </page>
    <page>
        <span class="pageStart"/>
        <p>...</p>
        <div>
            <page>
                <span class="pageStart"/>
                <p>...</p>
                <p>...</p>
            </page>
            <page>
                <span class="pageStart"/>
                <div>...</div>
                <img/>
            </page>
        </div>
    </page>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
It would be A LOT easier to decipher what you're asking for if you included some sample input and output XML. –  Jim Garrison Mar 24 '11 at 2:34
    
That rule plus an identity rule will produce the exact output. What's the question? –  user357812 Mar 27 '11 at 16:49
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for a complete, short and easy solution. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Mar 27 '11 at 18:37
    
@Alejandro: I actually went back and forth whether or not to post this here or on codereview.stackexchange.com. I decided here because of the one flaw I mentioned. I'm trying out Dimitre's solution now. –  Mattio Mar 29 '11 at 20:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output method="xml" omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="*[span/@class='pageStart']">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:copy-of select="@*"/>
   <xsl:for-each-group select="node()"
       group-starting-with="span[@class='pageStart']">
     <page>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="current-group()"/>
     </page>
   </xsl:for-each-group>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the provided XML document:

<html>
<head></head>
<body>
    <span class="pageStart"/>
    <p>...</p>
    <div>...</div>
    <img />
    <p></p>
    <span class="pageStart"/>
    <div>...</div>
    <span class="pageStart"/>
    <p>...</p>
    <div>
        <span class="pageStart"/>
        <p>...</p>
        <p>...</p>
        <span class="pageStart"/>
        <div>...</div>
        <img/>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

produces the wanted, correct result:

<html>
   <head/>
   <body>
      <page>
         <span class="pageStart"/>
         <p>...</p>
         <div>...</div>
         <img/>
         <p/>
      </page>
      <page>
         <span class="pageStart"/>
         <div>...</div>
      </page>
      <page>
         <span class="pageStart"/>
         <p>...</p>
         <div>
            <page>
               <span class="pageStart"/>
               <p>...</p>
               <p>...</p>
            </page>
            <page>
               <span class="pageStart"/>
               <div>...</div>
               <img/>
            </page>
         </div>
      </page>
   </body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
My sample is too simple for the problem. The page start markers could appear at the end of something like a deeply nested div, really requiring all open tags to be closed, then re-opened to start a page to wrap the content. But it's no longer an issue because I was able to get different source XML that does not allow pages to start in arbitrary locations. Thanks for your help! –  Mattio Mar 29 '11 at 21:24
    
@Mattio: You are welcome. –  Dimitre Novatchev Mar 29 '11 at 22:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.