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I'm trying to run the following code but get a casting error. How can I rewrite my code to achive the same ?

boolResult= (bool?)dataReader["BOOL_FLAG"] ?? true;
intResult= (int?)dataReader["INT_VALUE"] ?? 0;

Thanks

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Do you know what the actual value contained in dataReader["BOOL_FLAG"] and dataReader["INT_VALUE"] are? –  Jonas Mar 23 '11 at 18:36

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use the "IsDbNull" method on the data reader... for example:

bool? result = dataReader.IsDbNull(dataReader["Bool_Flag"]) ? null : (bool)dataReader["Bool_Flag"]

Edit

You'd need to do something akin to: bool? nullBoolean = null;

you'd have

bool? result = dataReader.IsDbNull(dataReader["Bool_Flag"]) ? nullBoolean : (bool)dataReader["Bool_Flag"]
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This won't work. You need to cast null to bool? –  Winston Smith Mar 23 '11 at 18:40
    
You're right, I updated my answer... I forgot that it can't tell if null is a string, bool?, MyCustomObject or what –  taylonr Mar 23 '11 at 21:08
1  
you can simply do ? (bool?)null : (bool)dataReader["Bool_Flag"] –  Winston Smith Mar 24 '11 at 8:35

Consider doing it in a function.

Here's something I used in the past (you can make this an extension method in .net 4):

public static T GetValueOrDefault<T>(SqlDataReader dataReader, System.Enum columnIndex)
{
    int index = Convert.ToInt32(columnIndex);

    return !dataReader.IsDBNull(index) ? (T)dataReader.GetValue(index) : default(T);
}

Edit

As an extension (not tested, but you get the idea), and using column names instead of index:

public static T GetValueOrDefault<T>(this SqlDataReader dataReader, string columnName)
{

    return !dataReader.IsDBNull(dataReader[columnName]) ? (T)dataReader.GetValue(dataReader[columnName]) : default(T);
}

usage:

bool? flag = dataReader.GetValueOrDefault("BOOL_COLUMN");
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2  
I like the second extension method. However, since IsDBNull() only takes an int, you'll have to call something like: dataReader.IsDBNull(dataReader.GetOrdinal(columnName)) –  Ishmael Smyrnow Aug 18 '11 at 15:22
bool? boolResult = null;
int? intResult = null;

if (dataReader.IsDBNull(reader.GetOrdinal("BOOL_FLAG")) == false)
{
  boolResult  = dataReader.GetBoolean(reader.GetOrdinal("BOOL_FLAG"));
}
else
{
  boolResult = true;
}

if (dataReader.IsDBNull(reader.GetOrdinal("INT_VALUE")) == false)
{
   intResult= dataReader.GetInt32(reader.GetOrdinal("INT_VALUE"));
}
else
{
   intResult = 0;
}
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== false? What's wrong with if (! ... –  Winston Smith Mar 23 '11 at 18:40
    
Just my convention. –  Mike Cole Mar 23 '11 at 18:42

I'm sure I found the inspiration for this somewhere around the interweb but I can't seem to find the original source anymore. Anyway, below you find a utility class which allows to define an extension method on DataReader, like this:

public static class DataReaderExtensions
{
    public static TResult Get<TResult>(this IDataReader reader, string name)
    {
        return reader.Get<TResult>(reader.GetOrdinal(name));
    }

    public static TResult Get<TResult>(this IDataReader reader, int c)
    {
        return ConvertTo<TResult>.From(reader[c]);
    }
 }

Usage:

  reader.Get<bool?>("columnname")

or

 reader.Get<int?>(5)

Here's the enabling utility class:

public static class ConvertTo<T>
{
    // 'Factory method delegate', set in the static constructor
    public static readonly Func<object, T> From;

    static ConvertTo()
    {
        From = Create(typeof(T));
    }

    private static Func<object, T> Create(Type type)
    {
        if (!type.IsValueType) { return ConvertRefType; }
        if (type.IsNullableType())
        {
            return (Func<object, T>)Delegate.CreateDelegate(typeof(Func<object, T>), typeof(ConvertTo<T>).GetMethod("ConvertNullableValueType", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Static).MakeGenericMethod(new[] { type.GetGenericArguments()[0] }));
        }
        return ConvertValueType;
    }

    // ReSharper disable UnusedMember.Local
    // (used via reflection!)
    private static TElem? ConvertNullableValueType<TElem>(object value) where TElem : struct
    {
        if (DBNull.Value == value) { return null; }
        return (TElem)value;
    }
    // ReSharper restore UnusedMember.Local


    private static T ConvertRefType(object value)
    {
        if (DBNull.Value != value) { return (T)value; }
        return default(T);
    }

    private static T ConvertValueType(object value)
    {
        if (DBNull.Value == value)
        {
            throw new NullReferenceException("Value is DbNull");
        }
        return (T)value;
    }
}

EDIT: makes use of the IsNullableType() extension method defined like so:

    public static bool IsNullableType(this Type type)
    {
        return 
            (type.IsGenericType && !type.IsGenericTypeDefinition) && 
            (typeof (Nullable<>) == type.GetGenericTypeDefinition());
    }
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Brilliant. Thank you. –  Steven Wilber Mar 18 at 14:13

Remember that a DBNull is not the same thing as null, so you cannot cast from one to the other. As the other poster said, you can check for DBNull using the IsDBNull() method.

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There's an answer here that might be helpful: http://stackoverflow.com/a/3308515/1255900

You can use the "as" keyword. Note the caution mentioned in the comments.

nullableBoolResult = dataReader["BOOL_FLAG"] as bool?;

Or, if you are not using nullables, as in your original post:

boolResult = (dataReader["BOOL_FLAG"] as bool?) ?? 0;
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I tried the dataReader["long_col"] as long? for a nullable long, but it set the value to null in all cases. –  bpeikes Oct 1 at 13:28

Try this version. It performs some basic conversion and manages default values as well.

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1  
Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. –  Shawn Chin Aug 28 '12 at 9:47

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