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I'm using the JavaScript regular expression:

val.match(/\d*$/)

It works as expected for all numbers expect when the string is "0". A single zero value does not match. How do I include that?

Test case:

<html>
<head>
<script src="scripts/jquery-1.5.1.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
</head>
<body>

<input type="text" id="txtRange" />
<div id="result" />

<script type="text/javascript">


    var rangeValidate = function (val, min, max) {
        if (val == "") {
            return "You must specify a number between " + min + " and " + max;
        } else if (val.match(/\d*$/) == false) {
            return "You must specify a number between " + min + " and " + max;
        } else if ((val < min) || (val > max)) {
            return "You must specify a number between " + min + " and " + max;
        } else {
            return "";
        }

        return "You must specify a number between " + min + " and " + max;
    }

    $('#txtRange').bind('change', function(){
            var value = $('#txtRange').val();
            var resultText = rangeValidate(value, 0, 8);
            $('#result').html(resultText);
    });

</script>
</body>
</html>
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It matches, "0".match(/\d*$/) returns the array ["0"] which when used in comparison is converted to its string representation "0".

But in JavaScript, the string `"0"` is "falsy", meaning it evaluates to `false` in a boolean context.

Edit: Ok, the string is not "falsy". Still, there is some conversion going on which eventually has the effect that "0" == false evaluates to true.

You should use .test()[docs] (which always returns a boolean value) instead and/or strict equality ===:

} else if (/\d*$/.test(val) === false) {

If the whole string should be a number, you should also anchor the expression at the beginning of the string:

/^\d*$/

Or don't use regex at all and use + to convert the value to a number. If it cannot be converted (because it contains something else than digits) it will return the special value NaN (not a number). You're code would become:

var rangeValidate = function (val, min, max) {
    val = +val;
    if (isNaN(val) || (val < min) || (val > max)) {
        return "You must specify a number between " + min + " and " + max;
    } else {
        return "";
    }
}

See a DEMO.

share|improve this answer
    
@Felix King - the string "0" is definitely not "falsy" in JavaScript. It's a non-empty string, and it is therefore true. –  Pointy Mar 23 '11 at 19:01
    
@Pointy: At least in the Chrome console, typing "0" == false gives me true. How should I interpret that? Ah I see.... there is some more conversion going on. –  Felix Kling Mar 23 '11 at 19:02
    
try !!"0" instead, or if ("0") alert('falsy'); –  Pointy Mar 23 '11 at 19:03
    
@Pointy: Yep, I tried it and you are right. My apologies. Fixed my answer regarding this. –  Felix Kling Mar 23 '11 at 19:06
1  
@Felix King - I found it in the ES5 standard. When the types around an "==" comparison are not the same, and one is a boolean, then the boolean is promoted to a number first. That, in turn, causes the string to be converted to a number, and so the actual comparison is between the numeric 0 obtained from the boolean conversion and the numeric 0 obtained from parsing the string. –  Pointy Mar 23 '11 at 19:17

0 == false returns true in javascript. 0 === false will return false in javascript.

Change your val.match(/\d*$/) == false in val.match(/\d*$/) === false. I don't know if this will fix your problem, but it's always good to keep this in mind.

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1  
It actually doesn't, FYI. === false will ALWAYS be false since the result of .match is an array. and [] === false will never match. Apparently, however, == has an implicit .toString() –  zyklus Mar 23 '11 at 19:00
    
nice one, forgot about the array thanks –  rsplak Mar 23 '11 at 20:48

Okay, wow... just weird. What's actually going on:

The result from a .match is an array. Since you have a single match, your result is ['0'], and ['0'].toString() === '0' == false.

In ANY other case (if you matched a paren set in the regex, etc), this would be NOT equal false regardless of whether or not it was zero.

Now for the weird bit:

> ['0'] == false
true
> !!['0']
true

So the == operator forces an implicit .toString() where as the ! operator doesn't!

share|improve this answer

Try this:-

var rangeValidate = function (val, min, max) {
    if ( /^\d+$/.test(val) && val>=min && val<=max ) {
        return "";
    } else {
        return "You must specify a number between " + min + " and " + max;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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