Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a tutorial or code example of using Ajax.BeginForm within Asp.net MVC 3 where unobtrusive validation and Ajax exist?

This is an elusive topic for MVC 3, and I cannot seem to get my form to work properly. It will do an Ajax submit but ignores the validation errors.

share|improve this question
add comment

6 Answers 6

up vote 260 down vote accepted

Example:

Model:

public class MyViewModel
{
    [Required]
    public string Foo { get; set; }
}

Controller:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        return View(new MyViewModel());
    }

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Index(MyViewModel model)
    {
        return Content("Thanks", "text/html");
    }
}

View:

@model AppName.Models.MyViewModel

<script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.unobtrusive-ajax.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.unobtrusive.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>

<div id="result"></div>

@using (Ajax.BeginForm(new AjaxOptions { UpdateTargetId = "result" }))
{
    @Html.EditorFor(x => x.Foo)
    @Html.ValidationMessageFor(x => x.Foo)
    <input type="submit" value="OK" />
}

and here's a better (in my perspective example):

View:

@model AppName.Models.MyViewModel

<script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.unobtrusive.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/index.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>

<div id="result"></div>

@using (Html.BeginForm())
{
    @Html.EditorFor(x => x.Foo)
    @Html.ValidationMessageFor(x => x.Foo)
    <input type="submit" value="OK" />
}

index.js:

$(function () {
    $('form').submit(function () {
        if ($(this).valid()) {
            $.ajax({
                url: this.action,
                type: this.method,
                data: $(this).serialize(),
                success: function (result) {
                    $('#result').html(result);
                }
            });
        }
        return false;
    });
});

which can be further enhanced with the jQuery form plugin.

share|improve this answer
22  
I agree about using jQUery for Ajax. I think that vast majority of Asp.net MVC Ajax applications rather use jQuery than the built-in Ajax extensions. –  Robert Koritnik Mar 24 '11 at 17:47
4  
I am using something like the following and the result seems to be going to its own page and not just replacing a div result. Do you know why? –  David Apr 11 '11 at 0:33
3  
Yes, I agree too in using pure jQuery for ajax, using the MVC ajax extension means you need to unnecessary learn other rules and syntax to, in the end, use jQuery. So even I need to write more, but is better do it the right way, plus you get more control and flexibility. –  Nestor May 23 '11 at 1:06
3  
@darin-dimitrov: when I try your latter example, I must add data: $('form').serialize(),to the ajax() call. Otherwise, no form data are passed and my model is invalid on the server side. Wonder if there is something I've overlooked? –  Brett Oct 31 '11 at 16:14
    
@Brett, there is nothing you have overlooked. It's me that simply forgot this in my answer. I have updated it now. Thanks for pointing this out. –  Darin Dimitrov Oct 31 '11 at 16:57
show 11 more comments

I think that all the answers missed a crucial point:

If you use the Ajax form so that it needs to update itself (and NOT another div outside of the form) then you need to put the containing div OUTSIDE of the form. For example:

 <div id="target">
 @using (Ajax.BeginForm("MyAction", "MyController",
            new AjaxOptions
            {
                HttpMethod = "POST",
                InsertionMode = InsertionMode.Replace,
                UpdateTargetId = "target"
            }))
 {
      <!-- whatever -->
 }
 </div>

Otherwise you will end like @David where the result is displayed in a new page.

share|improve this answer
4  
David's issue is almost always caused from not including the jqueryval bundle which contains the unobtrusive ajax code. Be very careful with this approach you posted otherwise you'll get one post and then your form is hosed since you've just replaced it. You then require your "MyAction"s view to manage its form and re-specify all the ajax options in it. –  Adam Tuliper - MSFT Sep 18 '13 at 7:40
add comment

I got Darin's solution working eventually but made a few mistakes first which resulted in a problem similar to David (in the comments below Darin's solution) where the result was posting to a new page.

Because I had to do something with the form after the method returned, I stored it for later use:

var form = $(this);

However, this variable did not have the "action" or "method" properties which are used in the ajax call.

$(document).on("submit", "form", function (event) {
    var form = $(this);

    if (form.valid()) {
        $.ajax({
            url: form.action, // Not available to 'form' variable
            type: form.method,  // Not available to 'form' variable
            data: form.serialize(),
            success: function (html) {
                // Do something with the returned html.
            }
        });
    }

    event.preventDefault();
});

Instead you need to use the "this" variable:

$.ajax({
    url: this.action, 
    type: this.method,
    data: $(this).serialize(),
    success: function (html) {
        // Do something with the returned html.
    }
});
share|improve this answer
4  
That's because the form variable you have set it the jQuery object with form as the selector. form[0] would have the properties. It's also good practise to prefix any jQuery variables with $ to more easily identify them. –  James South May 29 '12 at 20:35
add comment

Example

//In Model

public class MyModel
{  
   [Required]
    public string Name{ get; set; }
}

//In PartailView //PartailView.cshtml

@model MyModel

<div>
    <div>
      @Html.LabelFor(model=>model.Name)
    </div>
    <div>
        @Html.EditorFor(model=>model.Name)
        @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Name)
    </div>
</div>

In Index.cshtml view

@model MyModel
<div id="targetId">
    @{Html.RenderPartial("PartialView",Model)}
</div>

@using(Ajax.BeginForm("AddName", new AjaxOptions { UpdateTargetId = "targetId", HttpMethod = "Post" }))
{
     <div>
        <input type="submit" value="Add Unit" />
    </div>
}

In Controller

public ActionResult Index()
{
  return View(new MyModel());
}


public string AddName(MyModel model)
{
   string HtmlString = RenderPartialViewToString("PartailView",model);
   return HtmlString;
}


protected string RenderPartialViewToString(string viewName, object model)
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(viewName))
                viewName = ControllerContext.RouteData.GetRequiredString("action");

            ViewData.Model = model;

            using (StringWriter sw = new StringWriter())
            {
                ViewEngineResult viewResult = ViewEngines.Engines.FindPartialView(ControllerContext, viewName);
                ViewContext viewContext = new ViewContext(ControllerContext, viewResult.View, ViewData, TempData, sw);
                viewResult.View.Render(viewContext, sw);
                return sw.GetStringBuilder().ToString();
            }
        }

you must be pass ViewName and Model to RenderPartialViewToString method. it will return you view with validation which are you applied in model and append the content in "targetId" div in Index.cshtml. I this way by catching RenderHtml of partial view you can apply validation.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Ajax forms work asynchronously using Javascript. So it is required, to load the script files for execution. Even though it's a small performance compromise, the execution happens without postback.

We need to understand the difference between the behaviours of both Html and Ajax forms.

Ajax:

  1. Won't redirect the form, even you do a RedirectAction().

  2. Will perform save, update and any modification operations asynchronously.

Html:

  1. Will redirect the form.

  2. Will perform operations both Synchronously and Asynchronously (With some extra code and care).

Demonstrated the differences with a POC in below link. Link

share|improve this answer
add comment

If no data validation excuted, or the content is always returned in a new window, make sure these 3 lines are at the top of the view:

<script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.unobtrusive.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.unobtrusive-ajax.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>
share|improve this answer
add comment

protected by Community Mar 14 '13 at 17:13

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.