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I have a collection of stuffs in a generic Dictionary<string, object>().

The key is a string, and I'm attempting to come up with a way to use a hierarchical data structure instead of a string as they key.

So instead of doing this: object value = myDictionary["App1.Account1.SomeSetting"]; I want to be able to do this:

object value = myDictionary[App1.Account1.SomeSetting]; (notice lack of quotes around the key.

This means the dictionary will become Dictionary<{something}, object>().

What's the best way to define that {something}? It would be strongly typed and would works like this:

App1 - could be any number of applications App1 could contain many accounts (App1.Account1) Accounts can contain many settings (App1.Account1.Setting1)

The {something} data-structure would be hard coded with all possible levels/settings, but I can't think of what it could be organized like to still work as a key.

EDIT: See my answer below for the solution. Hopefully it helps someone else.

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What do you mean by hierarchical? Making a Dictionary<EnumType, object> would make unique values for each value of the enum (and any other integer values for the enum). –  Tejs Mar 23 '11 at 19:21
1  
Maybe if you could explain what you're trying to do... –  hunter Mar 23 '11 at 19:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think I understand what you want: you want your "flat" Dictionary of keys and values to be made accessible via specifying a compiler-checked identifier set that evaluates to the string that is the key of the Dictionary.

Before going down this road, I must ask, why don't you simply store the values in this hierarchical structure that would produce your keys? If you're going to go to the trouble of setting this structure up, it seems rather superfluous to do it just to evaluate it into a string key.

Instead, you could have the relatively simple structure:

public class App
{
   public Account[] Accounts {}
}

public class Account
{
   public decimal ApprovedAmount {get;set;}
   public int ContractLength {get;set;}
}

... and then either define constant App1, App2, etc, or set these classes to be serializable to-from XML, or mapped to an ORM, so they can be saved in some relatively program-agnostic, human-consumable state.

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The dictionary will hold permissions based on the user, so the values need to be not strongly typed and their number will change based on the user logged in. It's possible to not have all the keys all the time in the dictionary. Forcing everything in to a strongly-typed model would not allow that flexibility. –  Leon Mar 23 '11 at 19:45
    
@Leon - But you said in your question: "The {something} data-structure would be hard coded with all possible levels/settings," so you would still have the problem of some of the values not being applicable for certain users no matter what solution you use, right? How does your user/permission code work; i.e., how do you know not to access non-permitted keys? –  Justin Mar 23 '11 at 19:49
    
The "dictionary" is wrapped in a class which takes care of situations when no key is found and degrades gracefully. Similar to how TryParse() framework methods are implemented. It's accepted by design that a key might not be in a dictionary at run-time. –  Leon Mar 23 '11 at 19:53

Trees are a natural fit for encoding hierarchical information. Use a tree.

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This was ultimately the solution I've implemented, with some generics and some pre-defined hierarchy of classes to replace the "settings" tree.

Usage:

    Settings secSettings = new Settings();

    secSettings.Add(new SettingNames.App1.Screen1.MaxBillAmountToConsolidate(), 50m);

    secSettings.Add(new SettingNames.App2.SingleSetting(), new DateTime(2010, 11, 25));

    secSettings.Add(new SettingNames.App1.Screen2.CanEditField2(), false);
    secSettings.Add(new SettingNames.App1.Screen2.CanEditField3(), true);

    int amount;
    if (secSettings.TryGetValue(new SettingNames.App1.Screen1.MaxBillAmountToConsolidate(), out amount))
    {
        Print(amount);
    }

    DateTime expiredDate;
    if (secSettings.TryGetValue(new SettingNames.App2.SingleSetting(), out expiredDate))
    {
        Print(expiredDate);
    }

    bool permission;
    if (secSettings.TryGetValue(new SettingNames.App1.Screen2.CanEditField2(), out permission))
    {
        Print(permission);
    }

    if (secSettings.TryGetValue(new SettingNames.App1.Screen2.CanEditField3(), out permission))
    {
        Print(permission);
    }

Settings classes (each class naturally in its own file, but all in the same namespace):

namespace Security
{

/// <summary>
/// Base class from which all Security Setting instances must inherit
/// </summary>
public abstract class SettingNameBase
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Returns fully qualified type name of the instance of this class as a string
    /// </summary>
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return this.GetType().FullName;
    }

}

[DataContract]
public class Settings
{
    [DataMember]
    private Dictionary<String, Object> settings = new Dictionary<String, Object>();

    public void Add<T>(SettingNameBase name, T value)
    {
        if (!settings.ContainsKey(name.ToString()))
        {
            settings.Add(name.ToString(), value);
        }
        else
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("A setting with the key '{0}' already exists.", name.ToString().Replace("+", ".")));
        }
    }

    public bool TryGetValue<T>(SettingNameBase name, out T value)
    {
        bool dictContainsKey = false;

        if (dictContainsKey = settings.ContainsKey(name.ToString()))
        {
            try
            {
                value = (T)Convert.ChangeType(settings[name.ToString()], typeof(T));
            }
            catch (InvalidCastException ex)
            {
                string errMsg = string.Format("Invalid cast of value '{0}' to type of {1} in Setting.Value<T>() method.",
                    settings[name.ToString()], typeof(T).FullName);

                throw new InvalidCastException(errMsg, ex);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            value = default(T);
        }

        return dictContainsKey;
    }

}

    public class SettingNames
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Setting for a user
        /// </summary>
        public class User
        {
            public class Name : SettingNameBase { }
            public class ID : SettingNameBase { }
            public class Password : SettingNameBase { }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Setting for App1
        /// </summary>
        public class App1
        {
            public class Screen1
            {
                public class CanEditField1 : SettingNameBase { }
                public class MaxBillAmountToConsolidate : SettingNameBase { }
            }
            public class Screen2
            {
                public class CanEditField2 : SettingNameBase { }
                public class CanEditField3 : SettingNameBase { }
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Setting for App2
        /// </summary>
        public class App2
        {
            public class SingleSetting : SettingNameBase { }
        }
    }
}
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