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I can currently populate and display a Drop Down using the following model annotations, viewmodel, and custom Editor template - but am having problems persisting the submission (more on that below):

//Domain
Public class Person
{
  public string FirstName {get;set;}
  public string LastName {get;set;}
  public string ClassName {get;set;}
  public int ClassId {get;set;}
  ...
}

//ViewModel
Public class PersonViewModel
{
  public Person Person {get;set;}
  [UIHint("SelectList")]
  public IEnumerable<SelectListItems> Classes {get;set;}

  public PersonViewModel
  {
    Person = new Person();
  }
}

//Controller
public ActionResult Create()
{
  var PersonViewModel = new PersonViewModel();
  _PersonService.PopulateClassList(PersonViewModel);
  return View("Create", PersonViewModel);
} 

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create(PersonViewModel PersonViewModel)
{
try
  {
  if (!ModelState.IsValid)
  {
    _PersonService.PopulateClassList(PersonViewModel);
    return View("Create", PersonViewModel);
  }

  var Person = new Person();
  Person.InjectFrom(PersonViewModel.Person);    
  _PersonService.Save(Person);

  return RedirectToAction("Index");
}
catch
{
  return View();
}
}

//View (just the pertinent part)
@Html.EditorFor(m => m.Classes)<br />
@Html.EditorFor(m => m.Person)

Which automatically uses the below templates - due to the viewmodel annotation

// Views/Shared/EditorTemplates/SelectList.cshtml
@model IEnumerable<SelectListItem>
@Html.DropDownListFor(m => m, Model)

Like I mentioned, the above works fine - as in the drop down is displayed properly, but obviously in its current state it's not saving the classID (or name) to the Person entity, I understand the problem but not sure how to fix it.

My questions:

  1. How can I save the selected value from the drop down to the Person entity

  2. How can I save both the ID and the Name into the Person entity - I'm guessing only way is a hidden field that gets populated with an onchange event (this sounds weird, I'm sure, but it's being stored in a document DB, so it's not normalized - I may just store Name in the end)

Thanks in advance! Mike

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think that in your viewmodel, you need to change your code so that Classes is an

IEnumerable<SelectListItem>

not <SelectListItems> and you'll need to add a field for the selected item.

Public class PersonViewModel
{
  public Person Person {get;set;}
  public IEnumerable<SelectListItem> Classes {get;set;}
  public string SelectedClassId {get; set;}
}

Then you can use code like this in your view to populate the dropdown.

@Html.DropDownListFor(x => x.SelectedClassId, Model.Classes, new { id = "classSelect" })

[EDIT]

I looked a little closer at what you're actually doing and it looks like you're creating a form to enter info for a new Person and then select a class for that person, which will then create the new Person and persist them.

Firstly, you shouldn't be passing your PersonViewModel to your service. A view model isn't part of your Domain. It should be used to facilitate communication between your View and your Controller.

Second, since you don't yet have a Person, your _PersonService.PopulateClassList() method should look more like this.

public IQueryable<Class> GetClasses()
{
     //Data access logic
     //return classes .AsQueryable()
}

This way you can get a list of classes whenever you need it. Your controller would then look like this.

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create(PersonViewModel model)
{
    try
    {
        if (!ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            model.Classes = _PersonService.GetClasses().Select(c => new SelectListItem
                                                               {
                                                                   Text = c.Name,
                                                                   Value = "" + c.Id
                                                               };
            return View("Create", PersonViewModel);
        }
            model.Person.ClassId = model.SelectedClassId;
            //You can ditch ClassName since you'll just look it up by ID
            _PersonService.Save(model.Person);
            return RedirectToAction("Index");
}

[In response to your questions]

If you want to get the SelectList logic out of the controller, you could modify the property in the model to look something like this.

Public class PersonViewModel
{
  public Person Person {get;set;}
  public string SelectedClassId {get; set;}
  public IEnumerable<SelectListItem> Classes 
  {
      get
      { return _PersonService.GetClasses().Select(c => new SelectListItem
                                                           {
                                                               Text = c.Name,
                                                               Value = "" + c.Id
                                                           };
      }
  }
}

This will access the service when that property is read. I can't remember for sure, but you may need to call .AsEnumerable() at the end.

I'm currently playing around with dropdown boxes to see if I can bind to a complex object within the model. More to come.

[Continuing]

Yes you can bind the dropdown value directly to the ClassId property of the Person within the model. I was able to do it using the following code in my model/view. My Person and Class objects might not be quite identical to yours, but you'll get the idea.

Also, I'm not sure about your domain, but if a class can exist without a person, it might make more sense to separate their data access logic into a PersonRepository and a ClassRepository (or PersonService, etc...), but I'll leave the domain-type thinking to you.

Model

    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Web;
    using DropDownTest.Classes;
    using System.Web.Mvc;

    namespace DropDownTest.Models
    {
        public class PersonViewModel
        {
            private ClassRepository _classRepository = new ClassRepository();

            public Person Person { get; set; }
            public IEnumerable<SelectListItem> Classes
            {
                get
                {
                    return _classRepository.GetClasses().Select(c => new SelectListItem
                                                               {
                                                                   Text = c.Name,
                                                                   Value = "" + c.ClassId
                                                               });
                }
            }
        }
    }

View

@model DropDownTest.Models.PersonViewModel

@{
    ViewBag.Title = "Create";
}

<h2>Create</h2>

@using (Html.BeginForm("Create", "Person", FormMethod.Post))
{
    <fieldset>
        <legend>New Person</legend>
        @Html.LabelFor(c => c.Person.FirstName)
        @Html.TextBoxFor(c => c.Person.FirstName)
        <br />

        @Html.LabelFor(c => c.Person.LastName)
        @Html.TextBoxFor(c => c.Person.LastName)
        <br />

        @Html.LabelFor(c => c.Person.ClassId)
        @Html.DropDownListFor(c => c.Person.ClassId, Model.Classes, new { id = "classSelect" })
        <input type="submit" value="submit" />
    </fieldset>
}

Class Repository (think of it as a service in this case) This is obviously faked, but if you were using abstract repositories, you could use something like this in unit testing and use your real repository for production use as long as both implemented IClassRepository and you used some sort of Dependency Injection (DI) - like Ninject - but this is a whole different topic :).

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web;

namespace DropDownTest.Classes
{
    public class ClassRepository
    {
        private static IQueryable<Class> _classes = new List<Class>
        {
            new Class { ClassId = 0, Name = "Class 0" },
            new Class { ClassId = 1, Name = "Class 1" },
            new Class { ClassId = 2, Name = "Class 2" }
        }.AsQueryable();

        public IQueryable<Class> GetClasses()
        {
            return _classes;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@GregB thanks for the advice, I wasn't too sure if I was doing the right thing. That said, I have quite a few drop downs - and other logic - and if I were to populate them all on the controller, it would become bulky, which I'd like to avoid. That's why I was thinking it was a good idea to do all that in the Service layer, but your saying it's not? Would you suggest creating a 'builder' class that I can instantiate and pass a viewmodel to from the controller to do all that? – Mikalee Mar 25 '11 at 16:22
    
@GregB also, regarding the dropdown code you gave "@Html.DropDownListFor(x => x.SelectedClassId, Model.Classes, new { id = "classSelect" })", I'd like to insert the value into the Person.ClassId of the embedded Person in the viewModel, as opposed to creating a ClassId in the viewmodel, is this possible? Thanks again. – Mikalee Mar 25 '11 at 16:25
    
@Mikalee I don't think it makes sense to create a dropdown list in the service layer because a dropdown list only makes sense in the context of a view. If you implemented a method in the service layer that returned a bunch of SelectListItems, but wanted to simply list out all the Classes in another view, you'd have to write a whole new method to do that. Better to keep the service layer focused on data access and worry about formatting in the controller. If you really want to get the logic out of the controller, you could put it in the model. I'll edit my answer to show you how. – GregB Mar 25 '11 at 20:49
    
@GregB thanks again for all the tips. Just one clarification, when I refer to my service layer it's not my data access layer. I also have a repository for the actual data access, the reason I created the service layer, to be used between the controller and repository, was for sort of a 'builder' object that can be used for the business logic, populating lists, etc, that might normally be in the controller. In case that wasn't clear earlier, what do you think about that? Would you still suggest populating lists in the viewModel? If so, is there any benefit to having a service layer? Thank you. – Mikalee Mar 28 '11 at 22:40
    
@Mikalee It's hard to give you a good answer without knowing more about your domain. Regardless of where you build these objects, in your service layer, in a factory or in a repository, I still think your model or controller should construct the dropdownlist. It's easy to spin your wheels on the stuff, but the most import thing to remember is that you have features to implement and code to write! Don't let BUFD get in the way of that; you can always refactor later. – GregB Mar 29 '11 at 14:57

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