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I have two classes.

public class A {
    public Object method() {...}
}

public class B extends A {
    @Override
    public Object method() {...}
}

I have an instance of B. How do I call A.method() from b? Basically, the same effect as calling super.method() from B.

B b = new B();
Class<?> superclass = b.getClass().getSuperclass();
Method method = superclass.getMethod("method", ArrayUtils.EMPTY_CLASS_ARRAY);
Object value = method.invoke(obj, ArrayUtils.EMPTY_OBJECT_ARRAY);

But the above code will still invoke B.method()

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7 Answers 7

If you are using JDK7, you can use MethodHandle to achieve this:

public class Test extends Base {
  public static void main(String[] args) throws Throwable {
    MethodHandle h1 = MethodHandles.lookup().findSpecial(Base.class, "toString",
        MethodType.methodType(String.class),
        Test.class);
    MethodHandle h2 = MethodHandles.lookup().findSpecial(Object.class, "toString",
        MethodType.methodType(String.class),
        Test.class);
    System.out.println(h1.invoke(new Test()));   // outputs Base
    System.out.println(h2.invoke(new Test()));   // outputs Test@860d49
  }

  @Override
  public String toString() {
    return "Test";
  }

}

class Base {
  @Override
  public String toString() {
    return "Base";
  }
}
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Hm i get "Base" for both h1 and h2.. –  Nick Russler Jun 29 '13 at 15:28
    
You should. It is not possible to call a grandfather method. Even by byte code manipulation. –  Rafael Winterhalter Jan 22 at 16:56
    
This only works when the class extends another. Is there a way to do this in any class? –  zcaudate Feb 12 at 5:33
    
As noted, h2.invoke does not work (behaves like h1), but still a very useful hack. –  Jesse Glick Aug 8 at 20:15

It's not possible. Method dispatching in java always considers the run-time type of the object, even when using reflection. See the javadoc for Method.invoke; in particular, this section:

If the underlying method is an instance method, it is invoked using dynamic method lookup as documented in The Java Language Specification, Second Edition, section 15.12.4.4; in particular, overriding based on the runtime type of the target object will occur.

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1  
But how does super.method() work? I believe JVM holds both A.method and B.method bytecode, and it chooses to call A.method() if B.method calls super.method(). –  Ted Mar 24 '11 at 20:53

You can't do that. It would mean polymorphism is not working.

You need an instance of A. You can create one by superclass.newInstance() and then transfer all fields with something like BeanUtils.copyProperties(..) (from commons-beanutils). But that's a 'hack' - you should instead fix your design so that you don't need that.

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But how does super.method() work? I believe JVM holds both A.method and B.method bytecode, and it chooses to call A.method() if B.method calls super.method(). –  Ted Mar 24 '11 at 20:46
    
@Ted super works that way, but you can only use it from the subclass. –  Bozho Mar 24 '11 at 21:22

I don't know how to do it in the case when You want to do the trick for included libraries, because the reflection doesn't work, but for my own code I would do this simple workaround:

public class A {
    public Object method() {...}
}

public class B extends A {
    @Override
    public Object method() {...}

    public Object methodSuper() {
        return super.method();
    }
}

For simple cases this is OK, for some automatic invocation not so much. For instance, when You have a chain

A1 super A2 super A3 ... super An 

of inheriting classes, all overriding a method m. Then invoking m from A1 on an instance of An would require too much bad coding :-)

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1  
This doesn't help you, when you have to use reflection (e.g. because methodSuper() did not exist in an earlier version of the platform you run on.) –  Marcus Wolschon Nov 10 '11 at 11:18
    
For me, that was enough. –  saulobrito Oct 26 '12 at 18:06

You can't, you'll need an instance of the super class because of the way methods dispatching works in Java.

You could try something like this:

import java.lang.reflect.*;
class A {
    public void method() {
        System.out.println("In a");
    }
}
class B extends A {
    @Override
    public void method() {
        System.out.println("In b");
    }
}
class M {
    public static void main( String ... args ) throws Exception {
        A b = new B();
        b.method();

        b.getClass()
         .getSuperclass()
         .getMethod("method", new Class[]{} )
         .invoke(  b.getClass().getSuperclass().newInstance() ,new Object[]{}  );

    }
}

But most likely, it doesn't make sense, because you'll loose the data in b.

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But how does super.method() work? I believe JVM holds both A.method and B.method bytecode, and it chooses to call A.method() if B.method calls super.method(). –  Ted Mar 24 '11 at 21:52
2  
It is an "special" instruction at the bytecode level ( just like a constructor ) that seems to be unavailable with reflection. The instruction is "invokeSpecial" see: java.sun.com/docs/books/jvms/second_edition/html/… –  OscarRyz Mar 24 '11 at 23:07

Building on @java4script’s answer, I noticed that you get an IllegalAccessException if you try to do this trick from outside the subclass (i.e., where you would normally be calling super.toString() to begin with). The in method allows you to bypass this only in some cases (such as when you are calling from the same package as Base and Sub). The only workaround I found for the general case is an extreme (and clearly nonportable) hack:

package p;
public class Base {
    @Override public String toString() {
        return "Base";
    }
}

package p;
public class Sub extends Base {
    @Override public String toString() {
        return "Sub";
    }
}

import p.Base;
import p.Sub;
import java.lang.invoke.MethodHandle;
import java.lang.invoke.MethodHandles;
import java.lang.invoke.MethodType;
import java.lang.reflect.Field;
public class Demo {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Throwable {
        System.out.println(new Sub());
        Field IMPL_LOOKUP = MethodHandles.Lookup.class.getDeclaredField("IMPL_LOOKUP");
        IMPL_LOOKUP.setAccessible(true);
        MethodHandles.Lookup lkp = (MethodHandles.Lookup) IMPL_LOOKUP.get(null);
        MethodHandle h1 = lkp.findSpecial(Base.class, "toString", MethodType.methodType(String.class), Sub.class);
        System.out.println(h1.invoke(new Sub()));
    }
}

printing

Sub
Base
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It was not possible until lately Google came with the new Gradle tool. So it only works in Android but listen up:

To describe the problem in more detailed way I would say:

I have several scenarios where the super class may have or not have implemented a particular method and there for I would like to call the super class method with reflection.

You can solve this problem using gradle flavors. For each scenario create a different flavor of you your app and decide wether you want to call the super method or not.

For example, if the super class method been introduced only in api 13, create a flavor for api 13+ and only call the super class method there.

This solution eliminate the need of using reflection to call super class method by suggesting multi build representation of the app.

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