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Solved! Solution on the bottom.

Hello!

I have an abstract class:

abstract class AbstractDataExport
{
        public string name;
        public abstract bool ExportData();
}

I have classes which are derived from AbstractDataExport:

class XmlExport : AbstractDataExport
{
    new public string name = "XmlExporter";
    public override bool ExportData()
    {
        ...
    }
}
class CsvExport : AbstractDataExport
{
    new public string name = "CsvExporter";
    public override bool ExportData()
    {
        ...
    }
}

Is it possible to do something like this? (Pseudocode:)

foreach (Implementation imp in Reflection.GetInheritedClasses(AbstractDataExport)
{
    AbstractDataExport derivedClass = Implementation.CallConstructor();
    Console.WriteLine(derivedClass.name)
}

with an output like

CsvExporter
XmlExporter

?

The idea behind this is to just create a new class which is derived from AbstractDataExport so i can iterate through all implementations automatically and add for example the names to a Dropdown-List. I just want to code the derived class without changing anything else in the project, recompile, bingo!

If you have alternative solutions: tell em.

Thanks

Solution:

Type[] types = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetTypes();
foreach (Type type in types)
{
    if (type.IsSubclassOf(typeof(AbstractDataExport)))
    {
        //Find all Constructors with no arguments (Type.EmptyTypes) and call them - with no arguments (null)
        AbstractDataExport abcde = (AbstractDataExport)type.GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes).Invoke(null);
        abcde.ExportData();
    }
}
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marked as duplicate by nawfal, rene, Karl Anderson, Jeremiah Willcock, Eric Brown Aug 26 '13 at 3:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 32 down vote accepted

This is such a common problem, especially in GUI applications, that I'm surprised there isn't a BCL class to do this out of the box. Here's how I do it.

public static class ReflectiveEnumerator
{
    static ReflectiveEnumerator() { }

    public static IEnumerable<T> GetEnumerableOfType<T>(params object[] constructorArgs) where T : class, IComparable<T>
    {
        List<T> objects = new List<T>();
        foreach (Type type in 
            Assembly.GetAssembly(typeof(T)).GetTypes()
            .Where(myType => myType.IsClass && !myType.IsAbstract && myType.IsSubclassOf(typeof(T))))
        {
            objects.Add((T)Activator.CreateInstance(type, constructorArgs));
        }
        objects.Sort();
        return objects;
    }
}

A few notes:

  • Don't worry about the "cost" of this operation - you're only going to be doing it once (hopefully) and even then it's not as slow as you'd think.
  • You need to use Assembly.GetAssembly(typeof(T)) because your base class might be in a different assembly.
  • You need to use the criteria type.IsClass and !type.IsAbstract because it'll throw an exception if you try to instantiate an interface or abstract class.
  • I like forcing the enumerated classes to implement IComparable so that they can be sorted.
  • Your child classes must have identical constructor signatures, otherwise it'll throw an exception. This typically isn't a problem for me.
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It may not be the elegant way but you can iterate all classes in the assembly and invoke Type.IsSubclassOf(AbstractDataExport) for each one.

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1  
+1: I believe that's pretty much the only solution. –  Steven Jeuris Mar 23 '11 at 21:20
    
Thank you very much! My solution is based on your suggestions. –  trampi Mar 23 '11 at 21:41
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Assuming they are all defined in the same assembly you can do:

IEnumerable<AbstractDataExport> exporters = typeof(AbstractDataExport).Assembly
    .GetTypes()
    .Where(t => t.IsSubclassOf(typeof(AbstractDataExport) && !t.IsAbstract))
    .Select(t => (AbstractDataExport)Activator.CreateInstance(t));
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Thanks, very interesting. Need to take a closer look on Activator.CreateInstance –  trampi Mar 23 '11 at 21:45
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typeof(AbstractDataExport).Assembly tells you an assembly your types are located in (assuming all are in the same).

assembly.GetTypes() gives you all types in that assembly or assembly.GetExportedTypes() gives you types that are public.

Iterating through the types and using type.IsAssignableFrom() gives you whether the type is derived.

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Thanks for your answer, assembly.gettypes() was something i needed for the solution. –  trampi Mar 23 '11 at 21:43
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Well, Reflection is your friend here. Before implementing that, you might want to consider the performance aspects of that - "Reflection is always costly" :-)

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1  
Thanks for your answer! Can you give me more informations about how slow the execution will be? Anything to compare to? :) –  trampi Mar 23 '11 at 21:54
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