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I was looking for some advice / help on my assignment. Since it is for a class I am not asking for anyone to literally write out the answers for me, but I do need help with my actual coding.

The Question:

Consider the following BNF grammar:

A -> I = E  
E -> T + E | T - E | T  
T -> F * T | F / T | F  
F -> P ^ F | P  
P -> I | L | (E)  
I -> a | b | ... | y | z  
L -> 0 | 1 | ... | 8 | 9  

Using the technique described in class implement a recursive descent parser that recognizes strings in this language. Input should be from a file called input.dat and output should be to the console. An example session might look like this:

String read from file: a=a+b-c*d The string "a=a+b-c*d" is in the language. String read from file: a=a**b++c The string "a=a**b++c" is not in the language.

You must implement the project in BOTH Java and C++! Implementations that do not include a solution in both languages will, at best, receive half credit. To simplify things you will not have to handle whitespace when parsing the string, i.e. "" and similiar are illegal characters in this language.

A correct related example with a different grammar:

// * <assign> => <id> = <expr>
// *     <id> => a | b | c
// *   <expr> => <lit> + <lit> | <lit> - <lit>
// *    <lit> => 0 | ... | 9 | (<expr>)

#include <iostream>

using std::cout;
using std::endl;

bool assign(void);
bool id(void);
bool expr(void);
bool lit(void);

char *c;

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

    c = argc == 2 ? argv[1] : (char *)"";

    if (assign() && *c == '\0') {
        cout << "The string \"" << argv[1] << "\" is in the language." << endl;
    }
    else {
        cout << "The string \"" << argv[1] << "\" is not in the language." << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

bool assign(void) {

    if (id()) {
        if (*c == '=') {
            ++c;
            if (expr()) {
                return true;
            }
        }
    }

    return false;
}

bool id(void) {

    if (*c >= 'a' && *c <= 'c') {
        ++c;
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

bool expr(void) {

    if (lit()) {
        if (*c == '+' || *c == '-') {
            ++c;
            if (lit()) {
                return true;
            }
        }
    }

    return false;
}

bool lit(void) {

    if (*c >= '0' && *c <= '9') {
        ++c;
        return true;
    }
    else {
        if (*c == '(') {
            ++c;
            if (expr()) {
                if (*c == ')') {
                    ++c;
                    return true;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return false;
}

My actual work so far: (I am leaving out the reading from the txt file for the moment, want to get the grammar working first) edit1: The problem is that none of the strings are showing up as valid strings that are in the language. Unfortunately even a simple string like a=b has to run through almost all the production rules so I can't pintpoint where I am going wrong

//A -> I = E 
//E -> T + E | T - E | T 
//T -> F * T | F / T | F 
//F -> P ^ F | P 
//P -> I | L | (E) 
//I -> a | b | ... | y | z 
//L -> 0 | 1 | ... | 8 | 9 

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

bool A(void);
bool E(void);
bool T(void);
bool F(void);
bool P(void);
bool I(void);
bool L(void);

char *c;

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){

     c = argc == 2 ? argv[1] : (char *)"";

    if (A() && *c == '\0') {
        cout << "The string \"" << argv[1] << "\" is in the language." << endl;
    }
    else {
        cout << "The string \"" << argv[1] << "\" is not in the language." << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

bool A(void){

    if( I() )
    {
        if ( *c == '=' ){
            ++c;
            if ( E() )
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}

bool E(void){

    if( T() ){
        if ( *c == '+' || *c == '-' ){
                ++c;
                if ( E() )
                return true;
        }
    }
    else
    if ( T() ){
        ++c;
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

bool F(void){

    if( P() ){
        if( *c == '^')
        ++c;
        if( F() )
        return true;
    }
    else
    if ( P() ){
        ++c;
        return true;
    }

    return false;

}

bool I(void){

    if ( *c >= 'a' && *c <= 'z'){
        ++c;
        return true;
    }

    return false;

}

bool L(void){

    if ( *c >= '0' && *c <= '9' ){
    ++c;
    return true;
    }

    return false;
}

bool P(void){

    if ( I() ){
        ++c;
        return true;
    }
    else
    if ( L() ){
        ++c;
        return true;
    }
    else
    if ( *c == '(' ){
            ++c;
            if ( E() ){
                    if ( *c == ')' ){
                        ++c;
                        return true;
                    }
            }
    }

    return false;
}

bool T(void){

    if( F() ){
        if ( *c == '*' || *c == '/' ){
                ++c;
                if ( T() )
                return true;
        }
    }
    else
    if ( F() ){
        ++c;
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}
share|improve this question
    
So... which bit are you having trouble with? Assume we don't have an opportunity to actually run your code. What inputs work? What inputs fail? How do they fail? –  Greg Hewgill Mar 23 '11 at 21:41
    
So what is the current problem? –  Argote Mar 23 '11 at 21:43
    
The problem is that none of the strings are showing up as valid strings that are in the language. Unfortunately even a simple string like a=b has to run through almost all the production rules so I can't pintpoint where I am going wrong. –  Bob Smith Mar 23 '11 at 21:43
    
That's all nice and good - but what is your actual problem? Does the program not do what you expect it to do, does it crash, does it not compile, ...? –  ChrisWue Mar 23 '11 at 21:44
    
You should ask a new question - as reading the input is a different problem and has nothing to do with your original problem. Have a look here stackoverflow.com/faq in regards of how to ask questions –  ChrisWue Mar 24 '11 at 1:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you have a generic problem with detecting things like

E = T + E | T - E | T

When you look for T() and it fails you try to look for T() again. You have made this mistake in most of the other functions as well.

The correct implementation for E() would be (updated after Chris comment):

if (T())
{
   if (c == '+' || c == '-')
   {  
      ++c;
      return E();
   }
   return true;
}
return false;

Lets exercise an example: "a=(3)"

A() -> I() returns true -> c == '=' -> E() -> T() returns true upon parsing 3 after calling into P() which ends up calling into E() again -> now c == ')' so we need to return true in E() otherwise if we return false here, parsing will stop in P()

I hope it's not too confusing but it's hard to express here. The best is if you write down the parse tree on a sheet of paper to visualize it.

Update again: You have a similar situation in T() and F()

share|improve this answer
1  
This will still fail for inputs like "a=(3)" -- you need to return true after a T for any lookahead in FOLLOW(E), not just EOF, and might as well return true for anything other than +/- –  Chris Dodd Mar 23 '11 at 22:19
    
I kind of see what both of you are saying..but I am still confused. I am under the impression that i really can't use the end of a string as validation for returning something is true only after it is confirmed that A() has returned true. How would i go about doing something like a lookahead and what is follow and eof ? I do see one of my problems for the double checking like you said, it doesn't make any sense to have if else if with both ifs having the same condition statement. –  Bob Smith Mar 23 '11 at 22:33
    
@Chris: good point, missed that one. I'll update my answer –  ChrisWue Mar 23 '11 at 22:46
    
@Bob: your lookahead is *c, and FOLLOW(E) is the set of characters that might come after a legal E. Since you check for EOF ('\0') at the top level after matching A(), you don't need to check for it anywhere else, but it doesn't hurt if you do. –  Chris Dodd Mar 23 '11 at 22:52
1  
@Bob: Also, in your P rule, you are incorrectly incrementing c after matching an I or L -- the I and L routine already do the increment, so the extra one in P is skipping a second character –  Chris Dodd Mar 23 '11 at 22:54

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