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here is what I have:

I have a struct like this:

struct foo {

  int a,b,c;

  float d; 

  float *array1;

  float *array;



  }; 

And now I use this struct for a 8x8 2D-Vector like this:

vector< vector<foo> > bar(8);
for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++)
    bar[i].resize(8);

Within my program, "bar" is now filled with data for example

bar[1][5].array1 = new float[256];
bar[1][5].array2 = new float[256];

etc...

My question is:

How can i free the memory used by bar correctly?

I tried a for-loop for freeing every float array like this:

delete [] bar[i][j].array1;

but that will result in a heap exception on runtime.

Thanks in advance :)

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1  
If your arrays will always have 256 elements, you should consider declaring them in this way: float array1[256]; float[256] array2; –  Eduardo León Mar 23 '11 at 22:36
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6 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This easiest way to accomplish this would be to create a constructor and destructor:

struct foo {

  int a,b,c;
  float d; 
  float *array1;
  float *array;

  foo()
  {
    array1 = array = 0;
  }

  ~foo()
  {
    delete [] array1;
    delete [] array;
  }

};

Even better would be members to track the size of array1 & array so that a copy constructor and/or assignment operator could clone them as needed.

Note: by "easiest" I do not mean "best". :)

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Add a destructor to your struct to clean up those members.

Alternatively you could do as Eduardo León suggests and allocate them as part of the structure.

float array1[256];

instead of

float *array1;
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First of all, you ought to use vector<float> instead of float*, arrays are evil.

Second, the way you are freeing the memory is correct, the mistake must be at some other place.

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Can you post an actual code fragment? If you're deleting just the elements you're allocating, there shouldn't be a problem.

I'd suggest a couple things to help narrow it down:

  1. Assign NULL to all your pointers on initialization
  2. Use shared_ptr types instead of raw float pointers - these will be automatically cleaned up when no references remain.
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Thanks, you first suggestion did the trick –  JoCa Mar 23 '11 at 22:42
    
Cool - it's still worth reading up on shared_ptr usage and start using them. You'll swear off raw pointers forever :) –  holtavolt Mar 23 '11 at 22:45
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I suggest you use an vector or other stl-container, which fits your need.

If it has to be arrays - better use an destructor in your struct, so you need not to think about manually cleanup:

  struct foo
  {
    int a,b,c;
    float d; 
    float *array1;
    float *array2;

     foo ()
        : a(0),
        b(0),
        c(0),
        d(0.0),
        array1(NULL),
        array2(NULL)
     { }

     ~foo ()
     {
        delete [] array1;
        delete [] array2;
     }
  }; 

edit: removed check of NULL on delete []

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You don't need to check for null when calling delete. –  linuxuser27 Mar 23 '11 at 23:00
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You have to add this destructor to your struct foo:

~foo() { delete []array1; delete []array2; }

I suggest also to create a constructor for you foo that initializes those two pointers to 0:

foo() :a(0),b(0),c(0), d(0.0), array1(0), array2(0) {}

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That sounds useful cheers –  JoCa Mar 23 '11 at 22:43
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