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I set up a WCF Web Service in Visual Web Developer 2010 Express using the 4.0 Framework and converted it to a RESTful service using this tutorial

I was able to modify it to my liking to accept url parameters like so:

namespace RestServicePublishing
{
[ServiceContract]
public interface IRestService
{
    [OperationContract(Name="GetXML")]
    [WebGet(UriTemplate = "/{param1}/{param2}")]
    XmlDocument GetXML(string param1, string param2);
}
}

The issue I am having is that I am getting a "Type 'System.Xml.XmlDocument' cannot be serialized" error when trying to return an XML document like this:

namespace RestServicePublishing
{
public class RestService : IRestService
    {

    public  XmlDocument GetXML(string param1, string param2)
    {

        //I am not using the parameters currently, I would just like to see if 
        //i can return XML first with this simple example:

        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        System.Xml.XmlWriter writer = XmlWriter.Create(sb);
        writer.WriteStartDocument(); 
        writer.WriteStartElement("People");
        writer.WriteStartElement("Person"); 
        writer.WriteAttributeString("Name", "Nick"); 
        writer.WriteEndElement(); 
        writer.WriteStartElement("Person"); 
        writer.WriteStartAttribute("Name"); 
        writer.WriteValue("Nick"); 
        writer.WriteEndAttribute(); 
        writer.WriteEndElement();
        writer.WriteEndElement(); 
        writer.WriteEndDocument(); 
        writer.Flush();

        XmlDocument xmlDocument = new Xml.XmlDocument(); 
        xmlDocument.LoadXml(sb.ToString());
        return xmlDocument; 
    }

}
}

I know there has to be a better way to set up an XML document and return it.. Any help is greatly appreciated!

Thank you in advance!!

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes - well.... the model for WCF says that you should not try to return an XmlDocument itself. Instead you return a custom type defined inside your programming environment. That type needs to be marked up to specify how it should be serialized into XML. Then when that method returns the custom type, WCF serializes it into an XML document implicitly.

I think what you want to return is something like this:

<People>
  <Person Name="Nick"/>
  <Person Name="Bonnie"/>
</People>

But the DataContractSerializer doesn't like to emit attributes. So using WCF in the normal way to produce XML web services, you will instead get something like this:

<People>
  <Person><Name>Nick</Name></Person>
  <Person><Name>Bonnie</Name></Person>
</People>

To do that, write your C# code like this:

namespace RestServicePublishing
{
    [ServiceContract]
    public interface IRestService
    {
        [OperationContract(Name="GetXML")]
        [WebGet(UriTemplate = "/{param1}/{param2}")]
        List<Person> GetXML(string param1, string param2);
    }
}

Then the type ought to look like this:

[DataContract]
public class Person
{
    [DataMember]
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

[CollectionDataContract(Name = "People")]
public class People : List<Person>
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry to sound like such a noob, but how do I handle the type example that you gave? I created a new class called 'Person' and dropped in that code, but from there I'm a little confused on what to do next.. Thanks again for your responce! – AngeloS Mar 23 '11 at 23:58
    
I figured it out .. create two classes: 1.Person and 2.People and drop in the above code. Then in the GetXML() method, have it return List<People> (also, change the return type in the service contract). Finally, instaniate a new People List 'List<People> ppl = new List<People>();', then instantiate a new Person like 'Person prsn = new Person();' and add a name to it, then add that Person to the people list by ppl.Add(new People {prsn}); ... finally return 'return new List<People>(ppl); – AngeloS Mar 24 '11 at 0:35
2  
I think the confusion is because you don't need a GetXML method. If your service just returns Person (or List<Person>), WCF does the XML stuff for you. :) – Tridus Mar 24 '11 at 1:44
    
@Tridus ahhh i understand now! thank you!! – AngeloS Mar 24 '11 at 16:31
    
Tridus is correct. The method name probably ought to be something more meaningful, like GetPeople(), instead of GetXML(). – Cheeso Mar 24 '11 at 23:57

Return it as a string and then load that string into an XmlDocument at the other end.

Is there an issue sending XML via WCF?

Or preferably, create a DataContract class that mimics the XML structure in code, and then WCF will turn it into XML for you.

share|improve this answer
    
I went with the 'sending it back as a string' method .. thanks! – AngeloS Mar 23 '11 at 23:39
    
Returning XML in a string is generally a bad idea. Better to return a custom type that gets serialized for you in the shape you prefer. – Cheeso Mar 23 '11 at 23:48
    
@Cheeso Are you the downvoter? Please re-read, I offered exactly your solution as an alternative. I don't think it's a "bad idea", you don't know what systems are connecting to this service or how easy it is to structure the response XML. The downvote is not warranted in this instance IMHO. – Adam Houldsworth Mar 24 '11 at 8:43
    
Yes, I voted down, I think it's a bad idea. I respect your right to disagree with my opinion. I read the alternative, but I believe characterizing it as an alternative is wrong. It is the primary option. The correct option. It's as if I would tell you, "well, you can become a heroin addict, live on the street, commit crimes to support your habit, and catch diseases. Alternatively, you could go to college, get a degree, and get a job, and live a sane life." Of course, it's not that extreme, but you get the point. The latter is the preferred option, and I recommend against the former, always. – Cheeso Mar 24 '11 at 23:57
1  
Fair enough, though the analogy is way off kilter, to the point it makes it sound like sending raw XML is the ultimate no-no, frankly, there is nothing wrong with it. Creating a wrapper type is not always possible and there is nothing wrong with raw XML as a solution. Perhaps this is the only affected method? Perhaps the XML comes directly from an actual XML file? Who knows - either way, sending raw XML isn't worth a downvote as the answer is not dangerous or misleading or incorrect... but each to their own. This is where my botheredness ends and I've amended my answer to be explicit :-) – Adam Houldsworth Mar 25 '11 at 8:52

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