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I'm new to Objective-C and I saw the "new type" BOOL (YES, NO).

I read that this type is almost like a char.

For testing I did :

NSLog(@"Size of BOOL %d", sizeof(BOOL));
NSLog(@"Size of bool %d", sizeof(bool));

Good to see that both logs display "1" (sometimes in C++ bool is an int and its sizeof is 4)

So I was just wondering if there were some issues with the bool type or something ?

Can I just use bool (that seems to work) without losing speed?

Thanks for your answers

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8 Answers 8

up vote 135 down vote accepted

From the definition in objc.h:

typedef signed char     BOOL; 
// BOOL is explicitly signed so @encode(BOOL) == "c" rather than "C" 
// even if -funsigned-char is used.
#define OBJC_BOOL_DEFINED


#define YES             (BOOL)1
#define NO              (BOOL)0

So, yes, you can assume that BOOL is a char. You can use the (C99) bool type, but all of Apple's Objective-C frameworks and most Objective-C/Cocoa code uses BOOL, so you'll save yourself headache if the typedef ever changes by just using BOOL.

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10  
"all of Apple's frameworks" - not true. Take a look at CGGeometry.h, specifically: CG_INLINE bool __CGPointEqualToPoint(CGPoint point1, CGPoint point2) { return point1.x == point2.x && point1.y == point2.y; } –  Elliot Nov 19 '09 at 8:32
40  
@Elliot You are correct. Many of the C frameworks (CoreFoundation, CoreGraphics, etc.) use C99 bool. All of the Objective-C frameworks use BOOL. –  Barry Wark Apr 5 '10 at 16:48
2  
all of apples objective-c frameworks –  Aran Mulholland Jun 2 '13 at 2:42

This code

bool myBool = 2;
if (myBool != true) printf("myBool != true\n");

BOOL myBOOL = 2;
if (myBOOL != YES) printf("myBOOL != YES\n");

NSMutableSet *set = [NSMutableSet new];
for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
{
    NSObject *obj = [NSObject new]; 
    [set addObject:obj]; // just making sure same pointers aren't reused
    BOOL objExists = obj;
    if(objExists)
    {
    }
    else
    {
        NSLog(@"Does NOT exist %@", obj);
    }
}

Outputs

myBOOL != YES
Does NOT exist 0x7f8548c08e00
Does NOT exist 0x7f8548c02b00
Does NOT exist 0x7f8548c06800
Does NOT exist 0x7f8548c03700

You can read about why the last if fails here http://blog.bignerdranch.com/564-bools-sharp-corners/

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The Big Nerd Ranch guys (literally wrote the book on Cocoa/iOS programming) have a good write-up on the subject: BOOL's sharp corners.

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Another difference between bool and BOOL is that they do not convert exactly to the same kind of objects, when you do key-value observing, or when you use methods like -[NSObject valueForKey:].

As everybody has said here, BOOL is char. As such, it is converted to an NSNumber holding a char. This object is indistinguishable from an NSNumber created from a regular char like 'A' or '\0'. You have totally lost the information that you originally had a BOOL.

However, bool is converted to an CFBoolean, which behaves the same as NSNumber, but which retains the boolean origin of the object.

I do not think that this is an argument in a BOOL vs. bool debate, but this may bite you one day.

Generally speaking, you should go with BOOL, since this is the type used everywhere in the Cocoa/iOS APIs (designed before C99 and its native bool type).

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As mentioned above, BOOL is a signed char. bool - type from C99 standard (int).

BOOL - YES/NO. bool - true/false.

See examples:

bool b1 = 2;
if (b1) printf("REAL b1 \n");
if (b1 != true) printf("NOT REAL b1 \n");

BOOL b2 = 2;
if (b2) printf("REAL b2 \n");
if (b2 != YES) printf("NOT REAL b2 \n");

And result is

REAL b1
REAL b2
NOT REAL b2

Note that bool != BOOL. Result below is only ONCE AGAIN - REAL b2

b2 = b1;
if (b2) printf("ONCE AGAIN - REAL b2 \n");
if (b2 != true) printf("ONCE AGAIN - NOT REAL b2 \n");

If you want to convert bool to BOOL you should use next code

BOOL b22 = b1 ? YES : NO; //and back - bool b11 = b2 ? true : false;

So, in our case:

BOOL b22 = b1 ? 2 : NO;
if (b22)    printf("ONCE AGAIN MORE - REAL b22 \n");
if (b22 != YES) printf("ONCE AGAIN MORE- NOT REAL b22 \n");

And so.. what we get now? :-)

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1  
You could, instead of using the ternary operator use !!b1. To convert between them –  Richard J. Ross III Mar 16 '12 at 18:34

I go against convention here. I don't like typedef's to base types. I think it's a useless indirection that removes value.

  1. When I see the base type in your source I will instantly understand it. If it's a typedef I have to look it up to see what I'm really dealing with.
  2. When porting to another compiler or adding another library their set of typedefs may conflict and cause issues that are difficult to debug. I just got done dealing with this in fact. In one library boolean was typedef'ed to int, and in mingw/gcc it's typedef'ed to a char.
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2  
Well... you can be expected to know the standard typedef's of your language (think size_t), and both bool (C99) and BOOL (ObjC) fall into that category. And if your code failed because of a change of typedef, it's your code to blame since you apparently did not handle the typedef as an opaque thing but relied on its implementation on one platform. (Nothing to be ashamed of, it happens, but it's not the typedef to blame.) –  DevSolar Jul 22 '10 at 7:41
    
The "standard" typedefs don't seem to be very standard (for example for a while MS didn't support posix standards, etc). If you don't use typedefs then the problem with typedefs changing or being different on different compilers is eliminated. –  Jay Jul 22 '10 at 20:08
1  
@Jay: Sorry, I should have explained why this "misdirection" is good. I will try to provide an example: if you use the typedef'd boolean instead of using an int or a char directly you're allowing a different type (that still works) to be used on each platform without breaking your code [reasons for this vary but we can imagine a platform where a char may be misaligned in memory and thus slower so an int may be used for a boolean instead]. –  João Portela May 26 '11 at 18:01
1  
@Jay: By "good semantics" I mean that when you declare your boolean BOOL varname instead of char varname it is more obvious that the two valid values for that variable are true/YES or false/NO. –  João Portela May 26 '11 at 18:04
1  
@Jay: BOOL is part of the Obj-C language specification (or rather, that of the Foundation classes), just like bool or uint32_t are defined by the C99 standard library. Yes, you can be expected to know that. –  DevSolar May 27 '11 at 9:10

The Objective-C type you should use is BOOL. There is nothing like a native boolean datatype, therefore to be sure that the code compiles on all compilers use BOOL. (It's defined in the Apple-Frameworks.

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This isn't strictly accurate. BOOL is defined by the Objective-C language (it's in one of the objc/*.h headers), not by the frameworks. Also, when compiling with C99 (which I think is the default), then there is a native Boolean type, _Bool (or bool if stdbool.h is included). –  dreamlax Nov 17 '11 at 0:43

Yup, BOOL is a typedef for a signed char according to objc.h.

I don't know about bool, though. That's a C++ thing, right? If it's defined as a signed char where 1 is YES/true and 0 is NO/false, then I imagine it doesn't matter which one you use.

Since BOOL is part of Objective-C, though, it probably makes more sense to use a BOOL for clarity (other Objective-C developers might be puzzled if they see a bool in use).

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5  
_Bool is defined in C99, and in the standard header stdbool.h, the macro bool is defined (which expands to _Bool) and true/false are defined here as well. –  Brian Mitchell Mar 27 '09 at 20:08

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