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I have 6 sounds on one view.

However I want it so that I can play more than one at once, So you tap sound 1 (sound 1 is playing) then sound 2 plays. while sound 1 is still playing.

But at the moment I press sound 1 (sound 1 plays), press sound 2 (sound 2 plays, but sound 1 stops)

Here is the code for the audio part.

- (IBAction)oneSound:(id)sender; {
    NSString *path = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"1" ofType:@"wav"];
    if (theAudio) [theAudio release];
    theAudio = [[AVAudioPlayer alloc] initWithContentsOfURL:[NSURL fileURLWithPath:path] error:NULL];
    theAudio.delegate = self;
    [theAudio play];   
    volumeTimer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:0.05 target:self selector:@selector(updateVolume) userInfo:nil repeats:YES];
}

- (IBAction)twoSound:(id)sender; {
    NSString *path = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"2" ofType:@"wav"];
    if (theAudio) [theAudio release];
    theAudio = [[AVAudioPlayer alloc] initWithContentsOfURL:[NSURL fileURLWithPath:path] error:NULL];
    theAudio.delegate = self;
    [theAudio play];   
    volumeTimer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:0.05 target:self selector:@selector(updateVolume) userInfo:nil repeats:YES];
}
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3 Answers 3

There is some important code missing, but it looks as if theAudio is a global you are using to manage the playing of your sounds. Since you destroy it whenever a sound is played whatever is currently playing will stop in preparation for the next sound.

There are several ways to fix this, one being that each sound gets its own unique AVAudioPlayer instance.

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How would i do this? Thanks –  LAA Mar 23 '11 at 23:40
    
Just put a "AVAudioPlayer" in front on the first declaration of "theAudio" (in each function) to make it a local variable, and not a global one. This will make sure both of your AVAudioPlayer's are not the same, so that one doesn't stop the other. –  dudeofea Jul 19 '12 at 21:51

don't release the player just because it exists. release when finished playing

You should implement this in the app delegate or a property of the app delegate so that the delegate reference remains valid if you pop the view.

You should not need to do this for each voice. Each voice will initial the player with a different filename or URL. You gain this by making sure that you will release when finished playing. The other thing to take care of is releasing players if the player doesn't finish because of an interruption.

#pragma mark -
#pragma mark Audio methods

-(void)playNote:(NSInteger)noteNumber {

    NSString *soundFilePath =
    [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i", noteNumber ]
                                    ofType: @"caf"];

    NSURL *fileURL = [[NSURL alloc] initFileURLWithPath: soundFilePath];

    AVAudioPlayer *playerToPrepare = [[AVAudioPlayer alloc] initWithContentsOfURL:fileURL
                                                                            error:nil];

    [fileURL release];

    [playerToPrepare prepareToPlay];
    [playerToPrepare setDelegate: self];

    [playerToPrepare play];

}

#pragma mark -
#pragma mark AVAudioPlayer delegate methods

- (void) audioPlayerDidFinishPlaying: (AVAudioPlayer *) playerThatFinished
                        successfully: (BOOL) completed {
    if (completed) {
        [playerThatFinished release];
    }
}
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What do you mean, each is separate ib actions? –  LAA Mar 23 '11 at 23:41
    
you caught me before my edit. my first answer was incorrect –  griotspeak Mar 23 '11 at 23:42
    
Would that be written written for each 6 sounds? E.g. 1.wav,2.wav,3.wav etc And what would need in the .h? –  LAA Mar 23 '11 at 23:55
    
I Updated the answer, but no. You should not...provided you create a means to release under odd circumstances. –  griotspeak Mar 24 '11 at 0:19

You can declare and use:

AVAudioPlayer *theAudio1;    // for file 1.wav
AVAudioPlayer *theAudio2;    // for file 2.wav
...
AVAudioPlayer *theAudio6;    // etc.

instead of releasing and reusing just one AVAudioPlayer.

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That still limits to 6 voices without a change to how you release –  griotspeak Mar 24 '11 at 2:22

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